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December, 1856 AD (search for this): chapter 19
, his gentle manliness and adhesion to right and justice won for him success in his undertakings and the love and admiration of those who knew him. He died in Guadalupe county, Texas, March 12, 1895. Brigadier-General James P. Major Brigadier-General James P. Major was born in Missouri in 1833. He entered the United States military academy in 1852, and was graduated in 1856 as brevet second lieutenant of cavalry. He served at the cavalry school for practice, Carlisle, Pa., and in December, 1856, was made full second lieutenant. He was on frontier duty next year, scouting and fighting, being engaged in a skirmish with the Comanche Indians near Fort Clarke, Tex., also in a combat with the Kiowas and Comanches near Grand Saline. On October 1, 1858, he was engaged in a skirmish against the Comanches near Wichita village, Tex., where he killed three Indians with his own hand. In 1859-61 he was at Indianola, Tex., a commissary depot. When the secession movement began, he resigne
October 1st, 1858 AD (search for this): chapter 19
James P. Major was born in Missouri in 1833. He entered the United States military academy in 1852, and was graduated in 1856 as brevet second lieutenant of cavalry. He served at the cavalry school for practice, Carlisle, Pa., and in December, 1856, was made full second lieutenant. He was on frontier duty next year, scouting and fighting, being engaged in a skirmish with the Comanche Indians near Fort Clarke, Tex., also in a combat with the Kiowas and Comanches near Grand Saline. On October 1, 1858, he was engaged in a skirmish against the Comanches near Wichita village, Tex., where he killed three Indians with his own hand. In 1859-61 he was at Indianola, Tex., a commissary depot. When the secession movement began, he resigned his commission in the United States army, March 21, 1861. He was first assigned to the staff of General Van Dorn, and received the thanks of that officer for the assistance which he rendered him in the capture of various Texas posts. At the battle of W
November 30th (search for this): chapter 19
s born in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduated in 1854 as brevet second lieutenant of infantry, and in the following year was promoted to second lieutenant, First dragoons. His service in the United States army was mainly on frontier duty, in the course of which he engaged in combats with the Indians; against the Apaches, near Fort Bliss, in 1855, and near the Almagre mountains, New Mexico, in April, 1856, and again near the Gila river, November 30th of the same year. He resigned February 27, 1861, and in the war between the North and South bore a conspicuous part as leader of Texas troops. In 1862 he had command of a brigade of Texas cavalry, McCulloch's division, and was on duty in the district of Arkansas. He proved himself a very efficient officer and, like many others, was in command of a brigade long before he received a commission as brigadier-general. At the battle of Milliken's Bend, during the siege of Vicksburg, Randal
November 28th (search for this): chapter 19
erved during the Atlanta campaign. Then, being promoted to brigadier-general, he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and General Wheeler, in reporting the Tennessee campaign under Hood, mentions Robertson among the officers to whom he gives special thanks for bravery and fidelity. As Sherman marched through Georgia, General Robertson was one of the ablest lieutenants of Wheeler in harassing the Federals and frequently defeating their raiding parties. He was reported as wounded in a fight, November 28th. In General Wheeler's last report, March, 1865, he mentioned General Robertson as one of his generals still disabled from wounds. After the close of the war General Robertson made his home at Austin, Tex. Brigadier-General Jerome B. Robertson Brigadier-General Jerome B. Robertson was born in Woodford county, Ky. At the age of twelve, being left an orphan without means, he was bound out for the period of his minority; but by industry and economy he purchased his liberty at eightee
December 26th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
e. He had his horse shot under him in the charge and fought on foot until he mounted another horse (whose rider had been killed), and continued the fight. In December, 1861, Col. James McIntosh was informed that the Creek chief, Ho-po-eith-le-yo-ho-la, had taken a position unfriendly to the Confederates, and gathered a large force of hostile Indians, mostly Creeks. Colonel McIntosh at once set out to break up their camp. He came upon the forces of the hostile chief at Chustenahlah, December 26, 1861, and, after a fierce battle, completely defeated, them. In his report he said: The South Kansas-Texas regiment, led by their gallant officers, Lieutenant-Colonel Lane and Major Chilton, breasted itself for the highest point of the hill, and rushed over its rugged side with the insatiable force of a tornado and swept everything before it. In the following March this regiment was again engaged in the fierce battle of Pea Ridge, in northern Arkansas. Colonel Greer, again commanding the
n with a loss of 1,776 in killed, wounded and missing, only a small part of the Confederates near Vicksburg were engaged, and Gregg's brigade had but a slight part in the battle. In January, 1863, he was transferred to Port Hudson, and in May ordered to Jackson. During the advance of Grant upon Vicksburg from the rear, in May, 1863, the Confederate forces in Mississippi were so managed that they were put into battle in detachments and beaten in detail. General Gregg, alone at Raymond, on May 12th, was allowed to be overwhelmed by a greatly superior force, but the fight he made was a memorable one. He retreated from that field in the direction of Jackson, where he was reinforced by other commands, forming the force that was being assembled under Gen. J. E. Johnston, with the design of raising the siege of Vicksburg. After the fall of Vicksburg and the evacuation of Jackson, when forces were being concentrated in Georgia to enable Bragg to defeat Rosecrans, Gregg's brigade was one o
May 8th, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 19
Pleasant Hill Major was again distinguished, and his services were invaluable during the Red river campaign. Through the whole campaign of 1864 in the TransMis-sissippi department General Major was untiring and vigilant, always prompt to march and to fight. He was in command of his brigade in Wharton's cavalry corps, in the district of Western Louisiana, when the war came to an end. From 1866 to 1877 he devoted his attention to planting in Louisiana and Texas. He died at Austin, Tex., May 8, 1877. Major-General Samuel Bell Maxey Major-General Samuel Bell Maxey was born at Tompkinsville, Monroe county, Ky., March 30, 1825. His family were of Huguenot descent, and came from Virginia to Kentucky. His father was Rice Maxey, who for years was clerk of both circuit and county courts in Clinton county, and later moved to Paris, Tex., where the son received the best educational advantages, preparatory to entering the West Point academy. He was there graduated in 1846, and was as
September 27th, 1838 AD (search for this): chapter 19
son was again wounded. He was, however, ready for the fray when General Longstreet went to Georgia, in September, and took part in the battle of Chickamauga. Later in the month General Robertson was sent to Texas to take command of a reserve corps. In 1865 he was commanding a brigade of Maxwell's division in Arkansas. After the war he settled in Waco, Tex., where he still lived in 1898. Brigadier-General Lawrence Sullivan Ross Brigadier-General Lawrence Sullivan Ross was born September 27, 1838, at Brentonsport, Iowa, whence, in the following spring, his father, Capt. Shapley P. Ross, moved to Texas. He was educated at the Wesleyan university, at Florence, Ala. While at home on a vacation, he organized his first company, composed of 135 men, and hastened to the support of Gen. Earl Van Dorn, then in command of the Second United States cavalry. Joining forces with that officer, he took part in the battle of Wichita, against the Comanche Indians, where 95 red men were slain
ch he was leading had never before been in action, but, under his guidance, behaved with such coolness and bravery as to win the approval of General Taylor in his reports. In the reports of this campaign, including the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, his name frequently appears, always in connection with honorable service. In the pursuit of Banks, Debray commanded a cavalry brigade under General Bee, and kept up the good work he had begun on his first encounter with the enemy. On May 18th the Federals ambuscaded him; but, said General Taylor, Debray opened, enfilading their line. Many were killed and wounded, and Wharton's charge captured a good many prisoners. After the termination of the Red river campaign, Colonel Debray was appointed a brigadier-general by Gen. Kirby Smith; he had worthily won this rank. After the peace he returned to Texas and made his home in Austin, where he died on January 9, 1895. Brigadier-General Matthew Duncan Ector Brigadier-General Mat
December 5th (search for this): chapter 19
body. Brigadier-General Xavier Blanchard Debray Brigadier-General Xavier Blanchard Debray rendered his military services, which were of great value and prominence, altogether in the Trans-Mississippi department, which was a large part of the time almost isolated from the rest of the Confederacy. During a part of 186he was aide-de-camp to the governor of Texas. In September of that year he entered the regular Confederate service as major of the Second regiment of Texas infantry. December 5th of the same year he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of a battalion of cavalry. With this command he was very active in scouting, reporting movements of the enemy, attacking their forces whenever it was advisable, and useful in every way to the commanding general. In the attack upon the Federals at Galveston on January 1, 1863, he was notably active, so that General Magruder in his official report gives special commendation to him in connection with other officers for efficiency and
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