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onfederate Congress. He served in that capacity until the organization of the permanent Confederate government in February, 1862. Resigning his seat in Congress, he raised a fine body of troops, known in the Confederate army of the West as Waul's Texas legion. Of this he was commissioned colonel, May 17, 1862, and assigned to the department under Van Dorn, and afterward under Pemberton. Waul's Texans especially distinguished themselves during the siege of Vicksburg, in the recapture, on May 22d, of one of Gen. Stephen D. Lee's redoubts, where the enemy had planted two of their colors. After other commands had hesitated, 40 men of Waul's legion recovered the redoubt, capturing 100 men and the flags. Immediately 30 guns of the enemy were trained upon them; they were almost buried in the debris thrown up around them, but, though some were wounded, none were killed. The captured colors were presented to Colonel Waul as due to the valor of the Texans. During this assault General Le
February 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 19
te. Brigadier-General Joseph Lewis Hogg Brigadier-General Joseph Lewis Hogg, of Texas, as soon as his State seceded from the Union, with that fidelity to the principle of State sovereignty which characterized so many thousands of the men of the South, threw his whole soul into the effort to make good the claim to separate independence. He assisted in organizing bodies of troops for the service of Texas and the Southern Confederacy, was commissioned colonel in 1861, and on the 14th of February, 1862, was appointed brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate states. His brigade embraced some of the flower of the youth of Texas and Arkansas who, filled with enthusiastic devotion, hastened to arm themselves for the defense of their respective States. It was composed of Major McCray's battalion of Arkansas infantry; the Tenth regiment of Texas cavalry, Colonel Locke; the Eleventh Texas cavalry, Colonel Young; Lieutenant-Colonel Crump's battalion of Texas cavalry
May 20th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ufferings of his command with heroic fortitude, and on the retreat his command won the admiration of their victorious enemies. In the defeat of the Federal land and naval forces at Galveston, January 1, 1863, he distinguished himself in command of the line troops, the ships and artillery being under Maj. Leon Smith. In April following he was in Louisiana with Gen. Richard Taylor, gained renewed commendation for his conduct at Camp Bisland, and was put in command of Sibley's brigade. On May 20, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier-general. In command of his brigade he operated brilliantly against the Federals in Louisiana, on the Lafourche in July, 1863, on the Fordoche in September, and in the Teche country in October, winning a brilliant victory at Bayou Bourbeau November 3d. General Taylor in his report gave General Green high praise, declaring that he seized, in a masterly manner, the exact moment when a heavy blow could be given. Taylor had already frequently commended the gall
April 21st, 1836 AD (search for this): chapter 19
s Green was born in Amelia county, Virginia, June 8, 1814. His father was Nathan Green, one of the most eminent jurors of Tennessee, a Supreme court judge, and president of Lebanon law college, that illustrious institution where so many of America's most prominent men received their legal education. In the fall of 1835, at the age of twenty-one, Thomas Green left his home in Tennessee and entered the ranks of the revolutionary army in Texas. He fought his first battle at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836, and from then until the disbandment of the army in 1837, identified himself with the most eventful skirmishes and engagements. In 1839 and 1840 he was engaged in skirmishes and expeditions against the Indians, and served with great distinction in the Mexican invasion of the frontier in 1842. He was placed in command of a company in 1846, and was sent to the support of General Taylor, on the Rio Grande. He fought with distinction in the battle of Monterey in September, and his daring
April 21st, 1816 AD (search for this): chapter 19
Vicksburg surrendered, General Whitfield encountered a party of 500 Federals. He attacked and defeated them at Messinger's ferry. Through the whole of 1864 he commanded a brigade under Forrest, and was in Mississippi when the war closed in 1865. He then returned to Texas, where he subsequently made his home. Brigadier-General Louis Trezevant Wigfall Brigadier-General Louis Trezevant Wigfall was born on the plantation of his father, in Edgefield district, Harrison county, S. C., April 21, 1816. He attended the Columbian college in South Carolina, taking the regular course, until the outbreak of the Seminole war, when he enlisted, and received a commission as lieutenant of volunteers. After the close of the war, he began the study of law at the university of Virginia, and upon his admission to the bar, in 1846, he moved to Texas and settled at Marshall, where he began the practice. He was elected to the State legislature of 1856-57, and was re-elected to that body for 1859-
July 1st, 1845 AD (search for this): chapter 19
otection were of great value. He advocated liberal appropriations for the improvement of rivers and harbors, the enlargement of postal facilities, and was the author of a bill which was the first to assert the right of way to railroads through Indian Territory, to facilitate immigration and commerce. Brigadier-General John C. Moore Brigadier-General John C. Moore was born in Tennessee and was appointed from that State to the United States military academy, entering that institution July 1, 1845, and four years later graduating, with promotion to brevet second lieutenant of the Fourth artillery. He served in Florida against the Seminole Indians, 1849 and 1850; on frontier duty at Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in his native State as a schoolteacher. A short time before the beginning of the war he moved to Texas. He went into the
June 8th, 1814 AD (search for this): chapter 19
. During the ill-fated Tennessee campaign of General Hood, in the fearful charge at Franklin, fell Gen. Pat. Cleburne, commander of one of the most renowned divisions of the Confederate army, and General Granbury, the leader of one of its most celebrated brigades. Their loss could never be compensated, and to this day the survivors of the army of Tennessee mention their names with reverence. Major-General Thomas Green Major-General Thomas Green was born in Amelia county, Virginia, June 8, 1814. His father was Nathan Green, one of the most eminent jurors of Tennessee, a Supreme court judge, and president of Lebanon law college, that illustrious institution where so many of America's most prominent men received their legal education. In the fall of 1835, at the age of twenty-one, Thomas Green left his home in Tennessee and entered the ranks of the revolutionary army in Texas. He fought his first battle at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836, and from then until the disbandment of the
September 12th (search for this): chapter 19
4, when he was detailed to Kansas, Dakota and Nebraska, where he was engaged in various expeditions against the Indians. He resigned his commission in the United States army in May, 1861, to join the Confederate army, and was appointed colonel of the Seventh Texas cavalry. During the expedition to New Mexico, early in 1862, under Gen. H. H. Sibley, he was in command in the Mesilla region, sent on expedition to Tucson, and held his post to the last. He was promoted to brigadier-general September 12th, and in January, 1863, he was assigned to command of the Indian Territory, where his energy in organization and administration won this commendation from the President: His service was efficient and of inestimable value. In March, 1864, he was assigned to command of the defenses at Galveston, but soon afterward took part in the Red river campaign, and, after the death of Gen. Thomas Green, commanded a division of cavalry. In reporting the operations following the battle of Pleasant Hil
January 4th, 1898 AD (search for this): chapter 19
nts, and had five horses shot under him. At the close of the war he settled in Texas. In 1873 he was sheriff of his county, and in 1875 a member of the constitutional convention. In 1881 he was elected to the State senate, where he served as chairman of the finance committee. He was elected governor of Texas in 1886, and was re-elected in 1888, by a majority of 150,000. As president of the State Agricultural and Mechanical college he rendered valuable service. Ex-Governor Ross died January 4, 1898, at his home at College Station, Tex. Brigadier-General W. R. Scurry Brigadier-General W. R. Scurry entered the Confederate army in 1861 and was commissioned lieutenantcol-onel of the Fourth Texas mounted volunteers. Early in 1862 this regiment was in the brigade of Gen. Henry H. Sibley that set out for the conquest of New Mexico. This expedition was one of the most trying of any of the campaigns of the war. The hardships endured in marching through a rocky, sterile country, in
September 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in his native State as a schoolteacher. A short time before the beginning of the war he moved to Texas. He went into the Confederate army from that State, and was commissioned colonel of the Second Texas infantry, September 2, 1861. At the head of this regiment he participated in the battle of Shiloh, April 6 and 7, 1862. Gen. Jones M. Withers, in his report of the battle, speaking of the time when the enemy was driven from his first position, alluded to the great gallantry of Colonel Moore. His regiment formed part of the force that enveloped and captured the splendid division of Prentiss. During the operations around Corinth, Colonel Moore was promoted to brigadier-general, being commissioned on the 26th of May, 1862. In the assault on Corinth his brigade went further than any other, according to Ge
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