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William C. Young (search for this): chapter 6
to the posts west of San Antonio and on to the Rio Grande at El Paso. Maj. H. A. Hamner was left to occupy posts on the route, and Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor went beyond the river into the Mesilla valley. He took a large number of prisoners and paroled them, and held possession of that part of New Mexico for a short time. He found the people opposed to the Confederates generally. His companies were merged into and became a part of Geo. W. Baylor's regiment in the Arizona campaign. Col. Wm. C. Young, under the appointment of Governor Clark, raised a cavalry regiment for the protection of our northern frontier on Red river. He crossed the river and captured Forts Arbuckle, Washita and Cobb, when the Federal forces under Maj. Wm. H. Emery retired into Kansas. This regiment was early next year (1862), with other Texas commands, in the battle of Elkhorn, Mo. The Confederate Congress adjourned the latter part of May, 1861, to meet at Richmond, Va., on the 20th of July, and Texas,
James Willie (search for this): chapter 6
checked everything like exultation over an unfortunate enemy whom a stern necessity had caused us to disarm. It was gratifying to me, as it is a pleasure to me to report to you, that the whole expedition passed off without one unpleasant incident. The gentlemen who were at headquarters with me to whom I am indebted for services cheerfully and promptly rendered, for which I owe them my thanks, were Col. P. N. Luckett, quartermaster-general of Texas; Maj. G. J. Howard, Mr. J. T. Ward, Gen. Jas. Willie, Dr. H. P. Howard, Mr. R. A. Howard, Mr. D. E. Tessier, Judges Fred Tate and T. J. Devine, Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number of companies and
John A. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 6
tenant-Colonel Baylor's command, viz., Captains Walker and Pyron, a battery of light artillery, Captain Edgar, a section of artillery, Captain Teel; two small detachments of horse under Lieutenants Paul and Dwyer, and an independent detachment of cavalry, Captain Goode. All these troops I placed under the command of Col. H. E. McCulloch. In addition to these there was a battalion of infantry raised for the occasion in San Antonio, under command of Lieut.-Col. James Duff, Captains Maverick, Wilcox, Kampmann, Navarro and Prescott, Maj. John Carolan, in all about 1,300 men. I have been actuated in this instance by the same motive which induced me to bring an overwhelming force against the United States troops at Indianola, viz., a desire to arrest and disarm them without bloodshed. All the arms and other public property are now being turned over to officers appointed to receive them, and the officers and men are in camp at the San Pedro springs, near this city. Having in considerat
J. W. Wilbarger (search for this): chapter 6
. C. Frost, and Maj. Ed Burleson. Governor Houston, while governor of Texas, had sent two companies to the northwestern frontier, one commanded by W. C. Dalrymple, aide-de-camp to the governor, and colonel commanding, and another under Capt. J. W. Wilbarger. Colonel Dalrymple, having received authority to act for the State, and being reinforced by a number of volunteer citizens, on the 18th of February demanded of Capt. S. D. Carpenter the surrender of Camp Cooper, garrisoned with 260 Federal soldiers, which was finally complied with on the 21st of the same month, the action being reported to the convention on the 23d. Captain Wilbarger's company, being taken into the Confederate service by Col. H. E. McCulloch, had several skirmishes and fights with the Indians, who made raids to steal horses and cattle, before he was ordered to Houston in the spring of 1862. He was sent back to Fort Belknap with a number of companies before the end of the war, and found, as he has stated in
J. T. Ward (search for this): chapter 6
soldiers, which checked everything like exultation over an unfortunate enemy whom a stern necessity had caused us to disarm. It was gratifying to me, as it is a pleasure to me to report to you, that the whole expedition passed off without one unpleasant incident. The gentlemen who were at headquarters with me to whom I am indebted for services cheerfully and promptly rendered, for which I owe them my thanks, were Col. P. N. Luckett, quartermaster-general of Texas; Maj. G. J. Howard, Mr. J. T. Ward, Gen. Jas. Willie, Dr. H. P. Howard, Mr. R. A. Howard, Mr. D. E. Tessier, Judges Fred Tate and T. J. Devine, Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number
Hiram Waller (search for this): chapter 6
ssion of, was under the command of Capt. B. H. Hill. On the 22d of February, Colonel Ford, LieutenantCol-onel McLeod, Commissioner Nichols and his secretary, Mr. Waller, proceeded to Brownsville; Col. F. W. Latham of that place furnishing the transportation for them. Commissioner Nichols addressed a communication to Captain Hill asking an interview, and sent it by Mr. Waller, who returned a verbal answer, stating that Captain Hill could be seen at his quarters. Another letter from Commissioner Nichols procured an answer and an interview on the 23d of February, in which he was informed that Captain Hill could not recognize him as commissioner of Texas;der the post or the property. A floating report having been heard that Captain Hill contemplated attacking Colonel Ford's forces, Lieutenant-Colonel McLeod and Mr. Waller had already gone to Brazos Santiago to fortify that place. Another letter was sent by Commissioner Nichols stating distinctly the object of his mission, and th
John G. Walker (search for this): chapter 6
, the commanding officer, being satisfied of my greatly superior force, surrendered unconditionally. There were 10 officers and 337 men, including 30 men who were captured some time since in San Antonio by Capt. James Duff, which I have heretofore neglected to report. My command consisted of Colonel McCulloch's cavalry, viz., six companies, Captains Pitts, Tobin, Ashby, Bogges, Fry, and Nelson; a squadron of Colonel Ford's State troops, under Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor's command, viz., Captains Walker and Pyron, a battery of light artillery, Captain Edgar, a section of artillery, Captain Teel; two small detachments of horse under Lieutenants Paul and Dwyer, and an independent detachment of cavalry, Captain Goode. All these troops I placed under the command of Col. H. E. McCulloch. In addition to these there was a battalion of infantry raised for the occasion in San Antonio, under command of Lieut.-Col. James Duff, Captains Maverick, Wilcox, Kampmann, Navarro and Prescott, Maj. Joh
to organize troops for the army, and on the 16th Colonel Van Dorn was ordered to station Capt. John C. Moore at Galveston in command of a battery. On the 23d, with an armed force of thirty soldiers, Colonel Van Dorn called at the quarters of Colonel Waite and requested him to go with him to the office of Major Mechling, which Waite refused to do until force was exhibited that he could not resist. Upon his arriving there Major Mechling demanded his surrender as a prisoner of war. After many woWaite refused to do until force was exhibited that he could not resist. Upon his arriving there Major Mechling demanded his surrender as a prisoner of war. After many words of controversy, he with his inferior officers, including Lieut.-Col. Chandler, surrendered, and were paroled and furnished transportation to the coast. On May 3d Lieutenant-Colonel Reeve, with his officers and 270 soldiers, arrived in camp near San Antonio from military posts in New Mexico, and a messenger with a white flag was sent to him with a demand for unconditional surrender. After the usual controversy about the right of Colonel Van Dorn to make such a demand, and the exhibition o
David E. Twiggs (search for this): chapter 6
lieutenant-colonel, and Terry, major, and a strength of over 1, 200 men. On the night of the 2d of March, Colonel Ford arrived at Brazos Santiago with a Federal officer from Fort Brown, who expected to meet the steamer Webster from New York that arrived the next day. The officer on board, Major Porter, assistant adjutant-general, being communicated with, it was found that he had come to superintend the embarkation of the Federal troops, by which the hope was inspired that the order of General Twiggs for the surrender of the post and departure of the troops would be complied with. Major Porter and Colonel Ford went to Brownsville the same morning. On March 4th it was reported on the island that there was shooting up at Fort Brown, and as it was supposed it was in honor of President Lincoln's inauguration, a furious excitement arose among the men at the indignity upon Texas soil, which was with difficulty allayed by the officers, and indeed not entirely until Colonel Ford sent a let
lumn of the United States troops in Texas yesterday, at noon, on the El Paso road, about 13 miles from this city, and that Colonel Reeve, the commanding officer, being satisfied of my greatly superior force, surrendered unconditionally. There were 10 officers and 337 men, including 30 men who were captured some time since in San Antonio by Capt. James Duff, which I have heretofore neglected to report. My command consisted of Colonel McCulloch's cavalry, viz., six companies, Captains Pitts, Tobin, Ashby, Bogges, Fry, and Nelson; a squadron of Colonel Ford's State troops, under Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor's command, viz., Captains Walker and Pyron, a battery of light artillery, Captain Edgar, a section of artillery, Captain Teel; two small detachments of horse under Lieutenants Paul and Dwyer, and an independent detachment of cavalry, Captain Goode. All these troops I placed under the command of Col. H. E. McCulloch. In addition to these there was a battalion of infantry raised for th
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