hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Galveston (Texas, United States) 127 1 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 99 1 Browse Search
John S. Ford 94 8 Browse Search
Sam Houston 81 5 Browse Search
Thomas Green 74 8 Browse Search
John Gregg 71 5 Browse Search
John G. Walker 71 3 Browse Search
San Antonio (Texas, United States) 69 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 369 total hits in 129 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
jor Mechling demanded his surrender as a prisoner of war. After many words of controversy, he with his inferior officers, including Lieut.-Col. Chandler, surrendered, and were paroled and furnished transportation to the coast. On May 3d Lieutenant-Colonel Reeve, with his officers and 270 soldiers, arrived in camp near San Antonio from military posts in New Mexico, and a messenger with a white flag was sent to him with a demand for unconditional surrender. After the usual controversy about theTroops in Texas. San Antonio, Texas, May 10, 1861. General: I have the honor to report that I met the last column of the United States troops in Texas yesterday, at noon, on the El Paso road, about 13 miles from this city, and that Colonel Reeve, the commanding officer, being satisfied of my greatly superior force, surrendered unconditionally. There were 10 officers and 337 men, including 30 men who were captured some time since in San Antonio by Capt. James Duff, which I have heret
H. A. Hamner (search for this): chapter 6
Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number of companies and proceeded with them to the posts west of San Antonio and on to the Rio Grande at El Paso. Maj. H. A. Hamner was left to occupy posts on the route, and Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor went beyond the river into the Mesilla valley. He took a large number of prisoners and paroled them, and held possession of that part of New Mexico for a short time. He found the people opposed to the Confederates generally. His companies were merged into and became a part of Geo. W. Baylor's regiment in the Arizona campaign. Col. Wm. C. Young, under the appointment of Governor Clark, raised a cavalry regiment for
pendent State out of the Union. Above Ringgold barracks a number of Mexicans made a raid over the river and killed a Mexican settler, friendly to the Confederate cause. Captain Edwards and Captain Nolen both, at different times, attacked them successfully; and they still being on his side of the river, Capt. Santos Benavides, of Laredo, came down with his company and had a battle with them and succeeded in driving them over the river. They were supposed to be under the direction of General Cortinas, who had formerly made a raid into Texas, causing what was called the Cortinas war, in the defeat of whom Colonel Ford had acted as an officer with Captain Stoneman of the Federal forces. Captain Benavides was afterward appointed colonel and did good service. He and his relatives, being Mexicans, exercised strong influence over the Rio Grande frontier in favor of the Confederacy during the war. Col. Henry E. McCulloch, under appointment by the committee of safety, raised a sufficie
Thomas J. Devine (search for this): chapter 6
ed us to disarm. It was gratifying to me, as it is a pleasure to me to report to you, that the whole expedition passed off without one unpleasant incident. The gentlemen who were at headquarters with me to whom I am indebted for services cheerfully and promptly rendered, for which I owe them my thanks, were Col. P. N. Luckett, quartermaster-general of Texas; Maj. G. J. Howard, Mr. J. T. Ward, Gen. Jas. Willie, Dr. H. P. Howard, Mr. R. A. Howard, Mr. D. E. Tessier, Judges Fred Tate and T. J. Devine, Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number of companies and proceeded with them to the posts west of San Antonio and on to the Rio Grande at El Paso. M
J. W. Thompson (search for this): chapter 6
was authorized to borrow $90,000, pledging the railroad school bonds as security for the loan. Col. John S. Ford, in his expedition to the lower Rio Grande, was accompanied by E. B. Nichols, commissioner and disbursing agent, appointed by the committee of public safety. With the two vessels conveying the forces from Galveston, composed of six companies, 500 strong, they arrived off the bar of Brazos Santiago February 21st, 1861, and were boarded by a pilot, who informed them that Lieutenant Thompson, with twelve men, was prepared with loaded cannon to resist their entry upon Brazos island. Thereupon Colonel Ford and Commissioner Nichols visited the island and had a conference with the lieutenant, who withdrew with his men. Colonel Ford with his force took possession of the island; the United States flag was lowered, and the Lone Star flag of Texas was hoisted and saluted with fifteen guns. In Colonel Ford's instructions the district over which he was to have command was defined
Santos Benavides (search for this): chapter 6
f Mexicans made a raid over the river and killed a Mexican settler, friendly to the Confederate cause. Captain Edwards and Captain Nolen both, at different times, attacked them successfully; and they still being on his side of the river, Capt. Santos Benavides, of Laredo, came down with his company and had a battle with them and succeeded in driving them over the river. They were supposed to be under the direction of General Cortinas, who had formerly made a raid into Texas, causing what was called the Cortinas war, in the defeat of whom Colonel Ford had acted as an officer with Captain Stoneman of the Federal forces. Captain Benavides was afterward appointed colonel and did good service. He and his relatives, being Mexicans, exercised strong influence over the Rio Grande frontier in favor of the Confederacy during the war. Col. Henry E. McCulloch, under appointment by the committee of safety, raised a sufficient number of companies and proceeded to the frontier posts in the no
D. E. Tessier (search for this): chapter 6
enemy whom a stern necessity had caused us to disarm. It was gratifying to me, as it is a pleasure to me to report to you, that the whole expedition passed off without one unpleasant incident. The gentlemen who were at headquarters with me to whom I am indebted for services cheerfully and promptly rendered, for which I owe them my thanks, were Col. P. N. Luckett, quartermaster-general of Texas; Maj. G. J. Howard, Mr. J. T. Ward, Gen. Jas. Willie, Dr. H. P. Howard, Mr. R. A. Howard, Mr. D. E. Tessier, Judges Fred Tate and T. J. Devine, Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number of companies and proceeded with them to the posts west of San Antonio a
J. F. Minter (search for this): chapter 6
easure to me to report to you, that the whole expedition passed off without one unpleasant incident. The gentlemen who were at headquarters with me to whom I am indebted for services cheerfully and promptly rendered, for which I owe them my thanks, were Col. P. N. Luckett, quartermaster-general of Texas; Maj. G. J. Howard, Mr. J. T. Ward, Gen. Jas. Willie, Dr. H. P. Howard, Mr. R. A. Howard, Mr. D. E. Tessier, Judges Fred Tate and T. J. Devine, Capts. D. D. Shea and W. T. Mechling, and J. F. Minter and Lieut. J. P. Major, C. S. army. Very respectfully, sir, I am your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Colonel Commanding. Brig.-Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Montgomery, Ala. Lieut.-Col. John R. Baylor, though elected with Colonel Ford, did not go in his command to the Rio Grande, but raised a number of companies and proceeded with them to the posts west of San Antonio and on to the Rio Grande at El Paso. Maj. H. A. Hamner was left to occupy posts on the route,
Thomas C. Frost (search for this): chapter 6
och, who, after performing his duty at the frontier posts, returned to Austin and raised companies for his Confederate regiment. He was stationed with them at San Antonio and did service there in securing the surrender of Federal troops, and was the highest officer in command until Colonel Van Dorn arrived in Texas and took command on the 26th of March, 1861. The style of the regiment was First McCulloch's Regiment Mounted Rifles, and its field officers were Col. H. E. McCulloch, Lieut.-Col. Thos. C. Frost, and Maj. Ed Burleson. Governor Houston, while governor of Texas, had sent two companies to the northwestern frontier, one commanded by W. C. Dalrymple, aide-de-camp to the governor, and colonel commanding, and another under Capt. J. W. Wilbarger. Colonel Dalrymple, having received authority to act for the State, and being reinforced by a number of volunteer citizens, on the 18th of February demanded of Capt. S. D. Carpenter the surrender of Camp Cooper, garrisoned with 260 Fede
Henry Eustace McCulloch (search for this): chapter 6
g influence over the Rio Grande frontier in favor of the Confederacy during the war. Col. Henry E. McCulloch, under appointment by the committee of safety, raised a sufficient number of companies er in troops for the Confederate service. This commission he turned over to his brother, Henry E. McCulloch, who, after performing his duty at the frontier posts, returned to Austin and raised compaf the regiment was First McCulloch's Regiment Mounted Rifles, and its field officers were Col. H. E. McCulloch, Lieut.-Col. Thos. C. Frost, and Maj. Ed Burleson. Governor Houston, while governor ofn on the 23d. Captain Wilbarger's company, being taken into the Confederate service by Col. H. E. McCulloch, had several skirmishes and fights with the Indians, who made raids to steal horses and cent detachment of cavalry, Captain Goode. All these troops I placed under the command of Col. H. E. McCulloch. In addition to these there was a battalion of infantry raised for the occasion in San A
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...