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k when divided. On the 23d of October, 1864, Captain Dickinson received a dispatch from Lieutenant Haynes of the Fifth battalion of cavalry, on the outposts near Green Cove Springs, that the enemyrom Company H of the Fifth battalion of cavalry, under command of Lieutenants Mc-Leod, Haile and Haynes. His destination was not confided to his command. On the 2d of February, 1865, just at sunsetenant to follow in pursuit of Colonel Wilcoxson, leaving the remainder under Lieutenants Haile, Haynes and McCardell with the guard in charge of the prisoners, with orders to move on by the way of Ha McEaddy, and 20 from Company H, Fifth battalion of cavalry, in command of Lieutenants Haile and Haynes, with one 12-pound howitzer, commanded by Lieutenant Bruton. The prisoners were forwarded to Talroad trestle to flank him on the right. Our left being well protected by Lieutenants Haile and Haynes, our center bravely holding their position, Lieutenant Bruton was ordered with his howitzer and
Louisiana negroes, in all about 600, under the command of Brigadier-General Ashboth. About two o'clock in the day the advanced pickets of victory. But presently the main body made its appearance and General Ashboth detached a part of his command to flank the village, and advanund. The contest was fierce and deadly for half an hour, when General Ashboth ordered the church, boarding-house and a private residence opp Captain Adams and o men of the Second Maine cavalry, killed. General Ashboth and Maj. N. Cutler were seriously wounded, and about 25 enlists the river, the town was in full possession of the Federals. General Ashboth and Major Cutler were carried to a private house, where their with their prisoners, contraband and plunder. About midnight General Ashboth was carried off in a carriage. Major Cutler and the other wou, it in reality resulted in a victory. The objective point of General Ashboth's expedition was to capture Tallahassee, the capital of the St
G. W. Scott (search for this): chapter 6
ry was then stationed at and near Marianna, about 300 men all told, residents of Jackson and adjoining counties, and men of fine intelligence. At Marianna was a cavalry company, commanded by Captain Chisolm; two other companies detached from Colonel Scott's battalion of cavalry were stationed, one under Capt. W. H. Milton 25 miles south of Marianna, and one under Captain Jeter 20 miles west, at Hickory hill. They were under the command of Colonel Montgomery, once a lieutenant in United Statesee, General Jackson had ordered Brigadier-General Miller to assume command of subdis-tricts, Colonels Turney and Smith being sick; and ordered all the troops in Colonel Smith's district and four companies of Fifth Florida cavalry, with Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, from Colonel Turney's district, to report to General Miller. Jackson also reported: I think there is great danger of an attack from the west coast, of which this present raid is the precursor. My force is entirely inadequate to meet t
found in the ruins of the church. Colonel Montgomery and his staff made a very precipitate retreat toward the Chipola river, the eastern boundary of the village, leaving the men to fight it out the best they could. The colonel was unhorsed and captured, and the staff made their way across the river in safety. The Confederates scattered in every direction, every man for himself, pursued by the Maine cavalry who kept up a steady fire upon them. The casualties on the Federal side were Captain Adams and o men of the Second Maine cavalry, killed. General Ashboth and Maj. N. Cutler were seriously wounded, and about 25 enlisted men wounded. The loss on our side was about 60 killed, burned and wounded. About 50 of the Confederates succeeded in crossing the Chipola river and tore up the bridge. Captain Miller, quartermaster, and Dr. Robinson, post surgeon, made attempts to reform the scattered command, and held them together until late in the evening, when they were reinforced by the
Dickinson (search for this): chapter 6
; and ordered all the troops in Colonel Smith's district and four companies of Fifth Florida cavalry, with Lieutenant-Colonel Scott, from Colonel Turney's district, to report to General Miller. Jackson also reported: I think there is great danger of an attack from the west coast, of which this present raid is the precursor. My force is entirely inadequate to meet these different attacks; too small when concentrated, it is indeed too weak when divided. On the 23d of October, 1864, Captain Dickinson received a dispatch from Lieutenant Haynes of the Fifth battalion of cavalry, on the outposts near Green Cove Springs, that the enemy in considerable force had been met and driven back by his command about 3 miles. He immediately moved with all haste to the front, his command consisting of a detachment of Company C, Captain Chambers; a detachment of his own Company H, under Lieutenant McCardell, and one 12-pound howitzer in command of Sergt. J. C. Crews; in all about 90 men. Arriving o
J. A. Williams (search for this): chapter 6
nemy outnumbered him two to one, their regiment a fine and well disciplined one. Lieutenant McEaddy, the only commissioned officer with him except his surgeon, Dr. Williams, was directed to keep his men in good line, ready for the charge, the signal to be given to him from the head of the advance by a wave of his handkerchief. arms. This was all done before they had time to learn the strength of our force. As we passed the wagons in the charge Captain Dickison directed his surgeon, Dr. Williams, to remain with the wagons and stop our advance as they came up. At this juncture Lieutenant McEaddy, in making ready for a charge, struck a pond, around whichdid you throw your life away? The colonel with true manhood replied, Do not blame yourself. You are only doing your duty as a soldier. I alone am to blame. Dr. Williams, our noble surgeon, soon came up and greeted the unfortunate officer as a brother united by the mystic tie. He was faithfully ministered to by true and brave
Caraway Smith (search for this): chapter 6
ith a small body of cavalry to meet them there. I ordered the reserves, militia and two sections of artillery, and the force at Newport under command of General Miller, to the same point. They arrived at the Natural Bridge about 4 o'clock in the morning, just in time to meet and repel two attacks. The enemy then formed under cover of a thick hammock and kept up an obstinate fight at intervals for ten or twelve hours. Early in the afternoon a part of the Second Florida cavalry under Col. Caraway Smith arrived. Our artillery, four pieces, opened a brisk fire, which our men followed up by a charge, and the enemy fled to their boats leaving many of their dead on the field. Our numbers were scarcely a third that of the enemy. Their loss is estimated at not less than 300 in killed, wounded and captured. Prisoners captured represent the loss as particularly heavy in officers; General Newton reported wounded. Our loss 3 killed and 22 wounded. Among the killed was Capt. H. H. Simmons,
ious, as the enemy were in large force at Jacksonville, Green Cove Springs and St. Augustine, with their gunboats in the river. Dickison at once decided to cross the river and reconnoiter near the enemy's stronghold, and ordered preparations made for five days rations. His cavalry consisted of a detachment from Company H of 64 men under Lieutenants McCardell and McEaddy, 33 from Company B of the same regiment, and 28 from Company H of the Fifth battalion of cavalry, under command of Lieutenants Mc-Leod, Haile and Haynes. His destination was not confided to his command. On the 2d of February, 1865, just at sunset, they reached the deserted city of Palatka. He then formed his men and made known to them that he intended crossing over into the enemy's lines. Not one of the heroic little band faltered in his duty or desired to turn back. The distance across the river was one mile, their only transportation one flatboat that could carry but twelve men and horses. They were all nig
Chapter VI Further operations in the fall of 1864 Federal Incursion to Marianna Green Cove Springs raid to Milton fight near Braddock Farm near Cedar Keys Natural Bridge the closing scenes. on the morning of the 25th of September, 1864, the usually quiet little town of Marianna, in west Florida, of about 2,000 inhabitants, was in a state of great anxiety over the report that the Yankees were coming. The nearest railway station was Quincy, some 50 miles east, and the nearest point on the gulf coast, St. Andrews bay, about an equal distance, where a number of Federal gunboats blockaded the sound. Pensacola, the largest naval station in the South, 150 miles to the west, was held by the Federals. The inhabitants, aside from the slaves, consisted of well-to-do planters, mostly emigrants from North Carolina and Georgia. The politics of this county previous to the war was strongly Whig, and secession was bitterly opposed; but after the war commenced the young men vol
ell-to-do planters, mostly emigrants from North Carolina and Georgia. The politics of this county previous to the war was strongly Whig, and secession was bitterly opposed; but after the war commenced the young men volunteered freely in the Confederate army. A small detachment of Confederate cavalry was then stationed at and near Marianna, about 300 men all told, residents of Jackson and adjoining counties, and men of fine intelligence. At Marianna was a cavalry company, commanded by Captain Chisolm; two other companies detached from Colonel Scott's battalion of cavalry were stationed, one under Capt. W. H. Milton 25 miles south of Marianna, and one under Captain Jeter 20 miles west, at Hickory hill. They were under the command of Colonel Montgomery, once a lieutenant in United States army and appointed from private life. He was a martinet with little or no experience in the field. There was also a post hospital in charge of Assistant Surgeon H. Robinson, C. S. A. The scout
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