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San Juan River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
elapsed when a scout from the east side of the St. John's river, where a small party was kept on watch, reportays rations. Starting at night he reached the St. John's river early the next morning, but having only one fl at the same time of a similar movement on the St. John's river, two steam transports left Barrancas, having ats near Green Cove Springs, Palatka and up the St. John's river as far as Volusia county, were kept constantlyons and two ambulances, to be moved across the St. John's river by means of one flatboat, with capacity to cargon were safely landed on the west side of the St. John's river. While this was going on a courier reported tcklawaha bridge and were retreating toward the St. John's river. I then ordered my command to march back in tt my picket of two men on the east side of the St. John's river intercepted the courier line between St. Augusy after they had returned from the last on the St. John's river, where, without the loss of a man, they killed
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rrived, and the enemy secured several flatboats and destroyed the ferry across the river. In this ruthless invasion, what spoils could not be carried off were destroyed. The Federals being strongly intrenched at Pensacola, with gunboats and transports in the bay, the towns lying on the Gulf coast having but limited means of defense and of easy access were made objective points of frequent expeditions. Too much credit cannot be given to our gallant soldiers on the west side of the Chattahoochee river who were thus constantly exposed to assaults by overwhelming forces. In the east the enemy continued his demonstrations, and our outposts near Green Cove Springs, Palatka and up the St. John's river as far as Volusia county, were kept constantly engaged. Learning from his scouts on the east side of the river that the enemy's garrison at Picolata was about 400 strong and was becoming very troublesome and insulting to our loyal citizens in that neighborhood, Captain Dickison resolv
Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
er reinforcements that were looked for from Tallahassee should arrive, but to take possession of thGeneral Ashboth's expedition was to capture Tallahassee, the capital of the State, and as the resise Federal movement threatening Marianna and Tallahassee, General Jackson had ordered Brigadier-Genemiles, to be forwarded to the department at Tallahassee, also to his family at Quincy. The bearer . This was communicated to headquarters at Tallahassee, whence orders came to move forward, with ant Bruton. The prisoners were forwarded to Tallahassee under a strong guard. Though almost brokenarpet-baggers, made his home in the city of Tallahassee. Among the captured papers was an order fr should the expedition prove successful and Tallahassee be taken, they would be at liberty to sack long cherished design to get possession of Tallahassee. Many instances of individual gallantry cod by Gen. Sam Jones on March 20, 1865, from Tallahassee, as follows: Since I have been in com[2 more...]
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was in a state of great anxiety over the report that the Yankees were coming. The nearest railway station was Quincy, some 50 miles east, and the nearest point on the gulf coast, St. Andrews bay, about an equal distance, where a number of Federal gunboats blockaded the sound. Pensacola, the largest naval station in the South, 150 miles to the west, was held by the Federals. The inhabitants, aside from the slaves, consisted of well-to-do planters, mostly emigrants from North Carolina and Georgia. The politics of this county previous to the war was strongly Whig, and secession was bitterly opposed; but after the war commenced the young men volunteered freely in the Confederate army. A small detachment of Confederate cavalry was then stationed at and near Marianna, about 300 men all told, residents of Jackson and adjoining counties, and men of fine intelligence. At Marianna was a cavalry company, commanded by Captain Chisolm; two other companies detached from Colonel Scott's batta
Horse Landing (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
iled in regard to their safety, increased by the great difficulty to be met in making a successful crossing of the river. But he moved on for about 3 miles, when night coming on, a halt was ordered and a detachment of four men was sent on to Horse landing to order the flatboat brought over by the time he would reach the landing next morning. Before crossing the river, he had directed Captain Mc-Gahaghan, who was at Horse landing with an infantry company of reserves for the purpose of removinHorse landing with an infantry company of reserves for the purpose of removing the machinery of the gunboat Columbine, to be ready to assist him when he returned from his expedition. Early next morning on arriving at the landing the boat was found ready. The position was a very critical one. It was apprehended that the enemy would soon follow with a large force to cut them off—an almost impenetrable swamp to the right and the St. John's in front giving them the advantage. This called forth all the resources of the leader to plan the successful accomplishment of so d
Fort Myers (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Rassa and Key West, to land in the neighborhood of St. Marks and, in conjunction with a naval force, ascend the river. Landing their forces of cavalry, infantry and artillery at the lighthouse, they marched to Newport and, finding that the bridge had been burned, advanced about 8 miles further up to the Natural Bridge, where some of our troops had taken position and were ready to meet them. This was a surprise to the enemy, as the opinion prevailed that our forces were so scattered from Fort Myers to the extreme western border of the State that it would be an opportune time for a successful expedition. Our troops made a most gallant and determined charge, repulsing the Federals at every point until they were forced to fall back to their gunboats, sustaining a very heavy loss. In this engagement the negro troops were commanded by Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, who a few weeks previous had been completely defeated and routed by Dickison's command and the militia forces at No. 4, near Cedar
Black Creek, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nant McCardell, and one 12-pound howitzer in command of Sergt. J. C. Crews; in all about 90 men. Arriving on the morning of the 24th of October, and supposing that the enemy would again come out at or near the same place, he made immediate arrangements for an attack. They failed to come out. He then learned there was a crossing 5 .miles above at Finegan's ford, whither he sent a scout, who soon reported that a cavalry command had crossed at that place and taken the road to Middleburg, on Black creek. He immediately marched to meet them on their return. There being two roads to guard, he placed a detachment on each, at a distance convenient for rapid concentration should it become necessary. Presently the enemy were seen returning, driving in a large drove of fine cattle to enrich their commissary stores with what they called rebel beef. Dickison concentrated his force to meet the Federals, who were preparing for the charge. On they came with drawn sabers, the polished blades fla
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the South, 150 miles to the west, was held by the Federals. The inhabitants, aside from the slaves, consisted of well-to-do planters, mostly emigrants from North Carolina and Georgia. The politics of this county previous to the war was strongly Whig, and secession was bitterly opposed; but after the war commenced the young men volunteered freely in the Confederate army. A small detachment of Confederate cavalry was then stationed at and near Marianna, about 300 men all told, residents of Jackson and adjoining counties, and men of fine intelligence. At Marianna was a cavalry company, commanded by Captain Chisolm; two other companies detached from Colonel Scott's battalion of cavalry were stationed, one under Capt. W. H. Milton 25 miles south of Marianna, and one under Captain Jeter 20 miles west, at Hickory hill. They were under the command of Colonel Montgomery, once a lieutenant in United States army and appointed from private life. He was a martinet with little or no experie
Suwanee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
been in command in this military district several raids have been made on it, and one demonstration of a more formidable nature, designed to get possession of St. Marks and this city. All have been frustrated with little loss to us, and in a manner highly creditable to those of our troops engaged. The first was made from Cedar Keys by a party of from 600 to 700 men on the 9th of February. It was thought they intended to penetrate by way of Newnansville to the railroad bridge, over the Suwannee river. I sent a party of the reserves and Second cavalry to Newnansville, under Brigadier-General Miller, and directed Capt. J. J. Dickison with his command to endeavor to get in rear of the enemy. Finding, I suppose, that they would encounter more opposition than they expected, they did not advance as far as Newnansville, but fell back to a position, No. 4, on the Florida railroad, near Cedar Keys. Captain Dickison attacked them early on the morning of the 13th ult., and though his numer
Milton, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter VI Further operations in the fall of 1864 Federal Incursion to Marianna Green Cove Springs raid to Milton fight near Braddock Farm near Cedar Keys Natural Bridge the closing scenes. on the morning of the 25th of SeptembeBlackwater bay, whence the troops were to march to Pierce's mills to secure a supply of lumber, and thence advance toward Milton, about 12 miles distant. Nearing Milton they came upon a detachment of about 80 Confederate cavalry, and a brisk fight ene attack until reinforcements of cavalry and artillery came up and they were forced to retire. The enemy pursued through Milton and on the road to Pollard. But the Confederate force, though unequal to a conflict with such superior numbers, succeeded in escaping capture. The Federals returned to Milton, leaving their cavalry to hold the place, where on the following morning a transport arrived, and the enemy secured several flatboats and destroyed the ferry across the river. In this ruthless
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