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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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A. McCormick (search for this): chapter 6
irely recovered from their wounds. During the years that have gone by they have been often reminded of their heroic deeds on that memorable occasion by their sufferings and the scars left as a lasting memorial. All honor to our brave defenders! Give them the meed they have won in the past, Give them the laurels they won in the strife. On their return to headquarters at Waldo they were met by General Miller and his command at Gainesville, also a detachment of cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel McCormick. The noble matrons of the town gave them a kindly welcome, with a sumptuous dinner they had prepared in anticipation of their arrival. In his report of this engagement Captain Dickison said, after recounting the events already narrated: I desire to make especial mention of the good conduct and gallantry of Lieutenant Bruton, of the artillery, and the heroic men under his command. Their conduct upon the field, under the most trying circumstances, was all that could be desired.
n with great rapidity. A scout reported that the enemy had left Levyville in a hasty retreat. It was soon found to be impossible to cut them off. Just before sundown they reached No. 4, near Cedar Keys, about 4 miles in the rear of the enemy. When night came on a halt was ordered and a strong picket put out. At daylight the next morning the following troops reported to Captain Dickison: Captain Sutterloh, with 18 men from the outpost, and the militia numbering 37 men, under Captains King, Dudley, Price and Watterson, making our entire force 160 men, including the artillery. A courier brought in a dispatch that General Miller was about 50 miles in our rear, on the road leading from Lake City. Confident that the enemy would fall back to the island, under cover of their gunboats, it was decided to engage them at once. The enemy's force consisted of two regiments of white and negro troops, from 600 to 700 strong, occupying a strong position behind the high embankment of the railroa
Wilcoxson (search for this): chapter 6
18 horses and 1 ambulance. Dickison now learned that Colonel Wilcoxson, with the Seventeenth Connecticut and ten large six-mok 52 men with one lieutenant to follow in pursuit of Colonel Wilcoxson, leaving the remainder under Lieutenants Haile, Haynerd day they learned from two deserters who were just from Wilcoxson's headquarters at Braddock's farmhouse, only 2 miles distd which he with a few of his command made the charge, Colonel Wilcoxson with his staff and a detachment of 20 cavalry being ax with 10 men killing and capturing every one, except Colonel Wilcoxson. He fought fearlessly. After firing his last shot hfight ended, Captain Dickison on inquiry learned that Colonel Wilcoxson was not among the prisoners. He looked in the direct the young guard, who called to Captain Dickison that Colonel Wilcoxson desired to see him. He dismounted to meet him, with averal thousand pounds of cotton. The lieutenant-colonel (Wilcoxson) captured was mortally wounded, and has since died in hos
Nathan Cutler (search for this): chapter 6
ming his right at the boarding-house and his left resting at the Episcopal church. Here the gallant men and boys impatiently awaited the arrival of the enemy. The Federal command consisted of a battalion of the Second Maine cavalry under Maj. Nathan Cutler, of Augusta, Me., and several companies, of deserters, the so-called First regiment of Florida Union troops, and two full companies of ferocious Louisiana negroes, in all about 600, under the command of Brigadier-General Ashboth. About t scattered in every direction, every man for himself, pursued by the Maine cavalry who kept up a steady fire upon them. The casualties on the Federal side were Captain Adams and o men of the Second Maine cavalry, killed. General Ashboth and Maj. N. Cutler were seriously wounded, and about 25 enlisted men wounded. The loss on our side was about 60 killed, burned and wounded. About 50 of the Confederates succeeded in crossing the Chipola river and tore up the bridge. Captain Miller, quarterma
John Newton (search for this): chapter 6
they determined upon making another effort to capture Tallahassee, and for this purpose an expedition was planned by Gen. John Newton for a concentration of forces from Cedar Keys, Punta Rassa and Key West, to land in the neighborhood of St. Marks aners, made his home in the city of Tallahassee. Among the captured papers was an order from his commanding general, John Newton, promising the negro troops, that should the expedition prove successful and Tallahassee be taken, they would be at liberst of them transports, appeared off Saint Mark's lighthouse and landed a force estimated from 1,500 to 2,000 men, Brig.-Gen. John Newton commanding. On the 5th they moved inland, retarded in their march by a part of the Fifth battalion Florida cavals than 300 in killed, wounded and captured. Prisoners captured represent the loss as particularly heavy in officers; General Newton reported wounded. Our loss 3 killed and 22 wounded. Among the killed was Capt. H. H. Simmons, Second Florida cavalry
William Cox (search for this): chapter 6
o advance guard, as they had just left their headquarters. A branch being between the enemy and our men, he ordered our advance, consisting of 10 men under Sergt. William Cox, to dismount and take position at the branch and await orders. The enemy halted not over 150 yards distant, and our advance under the excitement fired intohad surrendered. Our command then fired into the colonel's escort which dashed off on the road toward the wagons, where a lively fight ensued, our surgeon and Sergeant Cox with 10 men killing and capturing every one, except Colonel Wilcoxson. He fought fearlessly. After firing his last shot he threw his pistol at one of our sol of the artillery, and the heroic men under his command. Their conduct upon the field, under the most trying circumstances, was all that could be desired. Sergt. William Cox of Company H, Second Florida cavalry, acting adjutant, was conspicuous for his gallantry and is entitled to the highest commendation for the efficient servi
reat rapidity. A scout reported that the enemy had left Levyville in a hasty retreat. It was soon found to be impossible to cut them off. Just before sundown they reached No. 4, near Cedar Keys, about 4 miles in the rear of the enemy. When night came on a halt was ordered and a strong picket put out. At daylight the next morning the following troops reported to Captain Dickison: Captain Sutterloh, with 18 men from the outpost, and the militia numbering 37 men, under Captains King, Dudley, Price and Watterson, making our entire force 160 men, including the artillery. A courier brought in a dispatch that General Miller was about 50 miles in our rear, on the road leading from Lake City. Confident that the enemy would fall back to the island, under cover of their gunboats, it was decided to engage them at once. The enemy's force consisted of two regiments of white and negro troops, from 600 to 700 strong, occupying a strong position behind the high embankment of the railroad. Cap
Edwin L'Engle (search for this): chapter 6
o their assistance, fearful indeed would the result have been. Thank God, who giveth the victory, the battle was not to the strong, and the horrors that had again threatened every home were averted by His overwhelming love. The slaves, horses and several hundred head of cattle, with other valuable property, were captured and returned to the owners. The enemy's loss was 70 killed and taken prisoner. We had 6 severely wounded. Three of these gallant young soldiers, Joseph C. Crews, Edwin L'Engle and John M. Johns, never entirely recovered from their wounds. During the years that have gone by they have been often reminded of their heroic deeds on that memorable occasion by their sufferings and the scars left as a lasting memorial. All honor to our brave defenders! Give them the meed they have won in the past, Give them the laurels they won in the strife. On their return to headquarters at Waldo they were met by General Miller and his command at Gainesville, also a detach
was a signal one, and again were the invaders foiled in their long cherished design to get possession of Tallahassee. Many instances of individual gallantry could be recorded, but where all fought with such dauntless intrepidity, not once wavering in their steady advance upon the enemy, repulsing them at every charge, they are all entitled to the highest commendation. The Kilcrease artillery, Gamble's battery commanded by Capt. Patrick Houston, and a section of Dunham's battery under Captain Raube, acted in the most gallant manner, dealing death and destruction to the invaders and contributing largely to the result of the battle. This battle and the operations closely preceding it were officially reported by Gen. Sam Jones on March 20, 1865, from Tallahassee, as follows: Since I have been in command in this military district several raids have been made on it, and one demonstration of a more formidable nature, designed to get possession of St. Marks and this city. All ha
Patrick Houston (search for this): chapter 6
berty to sack the city. But our victory at Natural Bridge was a signal one, and again were the invaders foiled in their long cherished design to get possession of Tallahassee. Many instances of individual gallantry could be recorded, but where all fought with such dauntless intrepidity, not once wavering in their steady advance upon the enemy, repulsing them at every charge, they are all entitled to the highest commendation. The Kilcrease artillery, Gamble's battery commanded by Capt. Patrick Houston, and a section of Dunham's battery under Captain Raube, acted in the most gallant manner, dealing death and destruction to the invaders and contributing largely to the result of the battle. This battle and the operations closely preceding it were officially reported by Gen. Sam Jones on March 20, 1865, from Tallahassee, as follows: Since I have been in command in this military district several raids have been made on it, and one demonstration of a more formidable nature, des
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