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J. Montgomery (search for this): chapter 6
ain Jeter 20 miles west, at Hickory hill. They were under the command of Colonel Montgomery, once a lieutenant in United States army and appointed from private life they generally proved false. On this occasion, however, September 25th, Colonel Montgomery made a personal reconnoissance and found the report well founded. He hasNorwood, a prominent Unionist, as their captain, and reported for duty to Colonel Montgomery, full of ardor and brave endeavor. Two roads enter Marianna from the wdiverging from the Campbellton road, led around the town in the rear. As Colonel Montgomery had no pickets out he did not know from which direction the Federals woul of the town, from the Campbellton road. It was then too late to draw in Colonel Montgomery's straggling line, so fire was opened upon the pickets about 200 yards in of the half-grown boys were afterward found in the ruins of the church. Colonel Montgomery and his staff made a very precipitate retreat toward the Chipola river,
Joseph L. Dunham (search for this): chapter 6
victory at Natural Bridge was a signal one, and again were the invaders foiled in their long cherished design to get possession of Tallahassee. Many instances of individual gallantry could be recorded, but where all fought with such dauntless intrepidity, not once wavering in their steady advance upon the enemy, repulsing them at every charge, they are all entitled to the highest commendation. The Kilcrease artillery, Gamble's battery commanded by Capt. Patrick Houston, and a section of Dunham's battery under Captain Raube, acted in the most gallant manner, dealing death and destruction to the invaders and contributing largely to the result of the battle. This battle and the operations closely preceding it were officially reported by Gen. Sam Jones on March 20, 1865, from Tallahassee, as follows: Since I have been in command in this military district several raids have been made on it, and one demonstration of a more formidable nature, designed to get possession of St. Ma
number of the enemy equal to one-third of our effective strength, as borne on the last return. Have added materially to our field transportation and recaptured much stolen property. The enemy's squadron is still off St. Mark's, and I anticipate another and more formidable demonstration to get possession of that port and this city. Dazzled as we are by the transcendent brilliancy of the military achievements of our great leaders, Lee, Jackson, Johnston, Longstreet, Hill, Stuart, Ashby, Hampton, Gordon, Forrest, Morgan and a host of others whose names will shine through the ages with undiminished luster on the page of history, yet there were thousands of gallant men in our own proud little State whose brave hearts never faltered, even at the cannon's mouth, the grandeur of whose character and warlike deeds have proudly illustrated the age, renowned as it is with heroes and events unparalleled in the annals of the world. Such the heroic soldier whose valorous deeds have been recor
ut after the war commenced the young men volunteered freely in the Confederate army. A small detachment of Confederate cavalry was then stationed at and near Marianna, about 300 men all told, residents of Jackson and adjoining counties, and men of fine intelligence. At Marianna was a cavalry company, commanded by Captain Chisolm; two other companies detached from Colonel Scott's battalion of cavalry were stationed, one under Capt. W. H. Milton 25 miles south of Marianna, and one under Captain Jeter 20 miles west, at Hickory hill. They were under the command of Colonel Montgomery, once a lieutenant in United States army and appointed from private life. He was a martinet with little or no experience in the field. There was also a post hospital in charge of Assistant Surgeon H. Robinson, C. S. A. The scouts had often brought alarms that the Yankees were coming from St. Andrews bay, but they generally proved false. On this occasion, however, September 25th, Colonel Montgomery m
William Miller (search for this): chapter 6
the Chipola river and tore up the bridge. Captain Miller, quartermaster, and Dr. Robinson, post surlahassee, General Jackson had ordered Brigadier-General Miller to assume command of subdis-tricts, Com Colonel Turney's district, to report to General Miller. Jackson also reported: I think there is he rear of the enemy and harass them until General Miller could arrive with his brigade, which wouldery. A courier brought in a dispatch that General Miller was about 50 miles in our rear, on the roa to headquarters at Waldo they were met by General Miller and his command at Gainesville, also a detSecond cavalry to Newnansville, under Brigadier-General Miller, and directed Capt. J. J. Dickison win the night of the 5th, where I found Brigadier-General Miller, who had promptly gone there with a cthe St. Mark's at the Natural Bridge. Brigadier-General Miller, anticipating the movement, sent Colo and the force at Newport under command of General Miller, to the same point. They arrived at the N
John T. Morgan (search for this): chapter 6
to one-third of our effective strength, as borne on the last return. Have added materially to our field transportation and recaptured much stolen property. The enemy's squadron is still off St. Mark's, and I anticipate another and more formidable demonstration to get possession of that port and this city. Dazzled as we are by the transcendent brilliancy of the military achievements of our great leaders, Lee, Jackson, Johnston, Longstreet, Hill, Stuart, Ashby, Hampton, Gordon, Forrest, Morgan and a host of others whose names will shine through the ages with undiminished luster on the page of history, yet there were thousands of gallant men in our own proud little State whose brave hearts never faltered, even at the cannon's mouth, the grandeur of whose character and warlike deeds have proudly illustrated the age, renowned as it is with heroes and events unparalleled in the annals of the world. Such the heroic soldier whose valorous deeds have been recorded in these pages, and wh
my equal to one-third of our effective strength, as borne on the last return. Have added materially to our field transportation and recaptured much stolen property. The enemy's squadron is still off St. Mark's, and I anticipate another and more formidable demonstration to get possession of that port and this city. Dazzled as we are by the transcendent brilliancy of the military achievements of our great leaders, Lee, Jackson, Johnston, Longstreet, Hill, Stuart, Ashby, Hampton, Gordon, Forrest, Morgan and a host of others whose names will shine through the ages with undiminished luster on the page of history, yet there were thousands of gallant men in our own proud little State whose brave hearts never faltered, even at the cannon's mouth, the grandeur of whose character and warlike deeds have proudly illustrated the age, renowned as it is with heroes and events unparalleled in the annals of the world. Such the heroic soldier whose valorous deeds have been recorded in these page
time. The Hon. William Marvin was made provisional governor, and held the office, by appointment of the president of the United States, until the winter of 1865, when we were granted the privilege of an election by the people for our State officers. One of our supreme judges, David S. Walker, by the unanimous voice of a proud constituency, was made governor. Not long, a little over two years, were we permitted to enjoy the blessings of his wise and peaceful administration. The red planet Mars was still in the ascendant, and eclipsed the pure lambent light of the beauteous star of peace. Our courtly governor was deposed by order of a military satrap, and a new regime established, most destructive to our prosperity and inexpressibly galling to the proud spirit of our citizens to the manor born. The despot's heel was upon our beloved land. We were deprived of all civil and political rights. We had neither law nor order; there was no protection of life, liberty or property. As a
g his command he took 52 men with one lieutenant to follow in pursuit of Colonel Wilcoxson, leaving the remainder under Lieutenants Haile, Haynes and McCardell with the guard in charge of the prisoners, with orders to move on by the way of Haw's creek and meet him at or near Braddock's farm, about 6 miles east of the river. He then rapidly proceeded with his detachment. They had marched but a few miles when Lieutenant McEaddy, commanding the advance, met a detachment of cavalry under Captain Staples and captured 1 man and 2 horses, the others making their escape in the swamp near by. Upon reaching the main road, a bright moonlight smiling upon them, they continued to press forward until midnight, when a halt was ordered for an hour. They continued their march, every few miles meeting deserters on their way to St. Augustine. Gaining all the information desired from them they were sent to the rear as prisoners. On the evening of the third day they learned from two deserters who we
John B. Dell (search for this): chapter 6
ain Dickison put out a picket line on his right and, with 142 men, moved and encountered the fire of the Federal picket. Dismounting his men a volley was received and returned, and then the Confederates made a daring charge. The enemy in their stronghold gave way before such dauntless bravery and in a few minutes Dickison held the road. The fight then became general, our artillery shelling them at a furious rate. They would give way, but rally again and again and renew the attack. Lieutenant Dell brought word that the Federals had been reinforced and were crossing the railroad trestle to flank him on the right. Our left being well protected by Lieutenants Haile and Haynes, our center bravely holding their position, Lieutenant Bruton was ordered with his howitzer and 10 men to the trestle that crosses over to the island. They were soon at the place. Never was artillery better handled; never more effective service rendered. At every attempt of the enemy to cross, a distance of
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