hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 1,568 10 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 896 4 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 766 2 Browse Search
Warren Sheridan 712 0 Browse Search
Hood 687 5 Browse Search
P. H. Sheridan 606 2 Browse Search
Meade 460 16 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 411 9 Browse Search
John Sherman 356 0 Browse Search
G. K. Warren 347 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 618 total hits in 118 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
tional forces retreat of Early, whirling through Winchester pursuit by Sheridan battle of Fisher's Hill Second defeat of Early further retreat of rebels effect of success at the North Grant's orders to Sheridan Early abandons the Valley censures of Lee disappointment in Richmond. Atlanta had fallen, the Weldon road was carried, and Early's exit from the Valley had been barred, but the end was not yet. A long and tedious prospect still stretched out before the national commander. Hood's army was not destroyed, the rebels were in force in Sheridan's front, and Lee had not abandoned Richmond. Grant looked the situation full in the face, and lost no time in adapting his plans to the actual emergencies. On the 8th of September, Sherman had entered Atlanta in person, and on the 10th, he was instructed: As soon as your men are sufficiently rested, and preparations can be made, it is desirable that another campaign should be commenced. We want to keep the enemy constantly pre
J. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 1
break it up, while Sheridan made a left half wheel of the main line of battle to support him. Crook advanced with spirit, forcing the enemy rapidly from his position, and at the same moment Torbert's. cavalry came sweeping up the Martinsburg road, overlapping Early's left, and driving the rebel cavalry before them in a confused mass, through the broken infantry. Sheridan now rode rapidly along the line of the Sixth and Nineteenth corps, to order their advance, and at the same time directed Wilson to push to the left with a division of cavalry, and gain the roads leading south from Winchester. Then returning to the right, where the battle was still raging, he ordered Torbert to charge with the remainder of the cavalry. Torbert advanced simultaneously with the infantry. The country was entirely open, and the movement could be distinctly seen by the enemy. Unable to resist any longer, crowded on both flanks, and fearful of being surrounded, the rebels everywhere broke, and as Sherid
J. A. Early (search for this): chapter 1
h commanders battle of Winchester blunder of Early Sheridan's plan Sheridan's attack original dan battle of Fisher's Hill Second defeat of Early further retreat of rebels effect of success ing in the Valley; in fact he had retired, and Early had followed him; so that on the Potomac also,against the enemy. This was immediately after Early's movement against Washington, and the veterann to the enemy. Nevertheless, the invasion of Early had failed, for the very reason which Grant hahe was aiming because of such a distraction as Early's campaign, than he had of re-crossing the Raper, become essential to defeat the movement of Early. Disaster in the Valley would lay open to thee neighborhood of Culpeper, to co-operate with Early. Anderson's orders were to cross the Potomac east of the Blue Ridge, while Early entered Maryland higher up the stream, and the two commanders, shington. This statement of Lee's orders to Early and Anderson is taken from McCabe, who gives i[4 more...]
G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1
The near approach of the Presidential elections reminded this party that it had still another chance; and, when Lincoln was renominated by the Republicans, General McClellan became the candidate of the Democrats, who openly declared the war for the Union a failure, and demanded an immediate cessation of hostilities. See resoluby protracted resistance they could even temporarily exhaust the endurance of those who had persisted so long—they would exert an influence directly favorable to McClellan. We have already referred to the great consideration which attached to the Presidential contest in the North which was now to take place; we have stated that it, at this crisis, the victory of Atlanta revived the drooping spirits of the nation and gave stamina to the government; and coming, as it did, the very day after McClellan's nomination, was a disastrous blow to the Democrats. Volunteering at once revived, and troops again began pouring into the armies. Meanwhile, the country an
Franz Sigel (search for this): chapter 1
it did, the very day after McClellan's nomination, was a disastrous blow to the Democrats. Volunteering at once revived, and troops again began pouring into the armies. Meanwhile, the country and even the government still believed that Washington was in danger. It has, however, already been seen that from the outset all of Grant's orders and plans had contemplated the complete protection of the capital. The route from the Rapidan had been selected with this view, and the expedition of Sigel was especially intended to close the avenue which the Shenandoah Valley would otherwise offer to the enemy. The movements of the Wilderness campaign, the constant retreat of Lee and the advance of Grant after every battle, had accomplished this purpose and effectually covered Washington; and up to the time of the crossing of the James there had been no apprehension in any quarter of an invasion of the North. Nor was the movement against Petersburg at all in contravention of the original de
e fall of Richmond, in April, 1865, one hundred and seventy-five guns were captured, of which forty-one were either 6 or 12 pounders. This does not include the artillery found in the city, nor that taken in the field. In my account of the works around Richmond and Petersburg, I have made free use of papers by Major-General Wright, Chief of Engineers, United States Army, and Lieutenant-Colonel Michie, also of the Engineers, published in the Report on the Defences of Washington, by Major-General Barnard, of the same corps; as well as of a paper on the Fortifications of Petersburg, by Lieutenant Featherstonaugh, of the Royal (British) Engineers. I am also indebted for valuable assistance to Major-General Humphreys, late Chief of Engineers, United States Army. The people of the North entirely failed to appreciate the importance of the seizure of the Weldon road. The disaster of Burnside had left an impression that could not easily be effaced, and all the subsequent manoeuvres on the
ubtless believed that Grant might be compelled to weaken himself in front of Richmond, and perhaps to raise the siege. McCabe's Life and Campaigns of General Lee; a work containing more trustworthy information from rebel sources than any other I h were to make a second movement against Washington. This statement of Lee's orders to Early and Anderson is taken from McCabe, who gives it still more minutely. Early, however, says not a word to indicate that he was expected a second time to croer the eye of a superior, he sometimes displayed ability, but an independent command was beyond his powers. * This was McCabe's opinion, as well as the general one at the South; but Early himself entertained a very different one.—See his Memoir, put Early was not anxious for battle at all, although reinforced; This is Early's own statement, although, according to McCabe and Pollard, he had been ordered to cross the Potomac. while an advance of Sheridan, in the event of reverse, exposed the
ten that Grant had warned the country he might have to fight all summer on one line; it was not known that he had ordered a siege train when he started from Culpeper, and had arranged for the crossing of the James while he was still north of the Rapidan. Soldiers indeed saw the immense advantages that had been gained, the definite progress made towards the end; During the month of July, 1864, 1 was sent to the North, and had several interviews with the old commander of the army, Lieutenant-General Scott. He expressed the greatest admiration for Grant's achievements, and complete confidence that his operations would result in entire success. I was especially charged by him to congratulate General Grant upon the manoeuvres and tactics of the Wilderness campaign, and on the strategy which employed all the armies constantly against the enemy. This was immediately after Early's movement against Washington, and the veteran appeared delighted that his younger successor had not allowed
and fifty-three pieces in position on the national lines, of which twenty were field artillery; and at the fall of Richmond, in April, 1865, one hundred and seventy-five guns were captured, of which forty-one were either 6 or 12 pounders. This does not include the artillery found in the city, nor that taken in the field. In my account of the works around Richmond and Petersburg, I have made free use of papers by Major-General Wright, Chief of Engineers, United States Army, and Lieutenant-Colonel Michie, also of the Engineers, published in the Report on the Defences of Washington, by Major-General Barnard, of the same corps; as well as of a paper on the Fortifications of Petersburg, by Lieutenant Featherstonaugh, of the Royal (British) Engineers. I am also indebted for valuable assistance to Major-General Humphreys, late Chief of Engineers, United States Army. The people of the North entirely failed to appreciate the importance of the seizure of the Weldon road. The disaster of
Washington (search for this): chapter 1
nce were, after all, few in number; and, as usual, the men who talked the loudest were laggard in action. But above all, at this crisis, the victory of Atlanta revived the drooping spirits of the nation and gave stamina to the government; and coming, as it did, the very day after McClellan's nomination, was a disastrous blow to the Democrats. Volunteering at once revived, and troops again began pouring into the armies. Meanwhile, the country and even the government still believed that Washington was in danger. It has, however, already been seen that from the outset all of Grant's orders and plans had contemplated the complete protection of the capital. The route from the Rapidan had been selected with this view, and the expedition of Sigel was especially intended to close the avenue which the Shenandoah Valley would otherwise offer to the enemy. The movements of the Wilderness campaign, the constant retreat of Lee and the advance of Grant after every battle, had accomplished th
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...