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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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George Crook (search for this): chapter 1
with the Sixth and Nineteenth corps, and send Crook to meet Breckenridge. But Sheridan replied ons with the Sixth and Nineteenth corps, holding Crook's division in reserve, to be used as a turningight, where the Martinsburg road comes in, and Crook was now directed to find the left of the rebeleel of the main line of battle to support him. Crook advanced with spirit, forcing the enemy rapidts of Strasburg, and at once determined to use Crook as a turning column again, and strike the enem of national troops by day could be observed. Crook was therefore concealed in the forest on the 2 Early's rear. Before daylight on the 22nd, Crook marched to Little North mountain, the western ttracted, and when a general firing had begun, Crook suddenly burst from the woods on the hillside,vement, first Ricketts swinging in and joining Crook, and then the remainder of the Sixth and Ninessing, but this does not include the losses in Crook's command or the cavalry. Early wrote to Lee
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1
shed him in the confidence of the President and the Secretary of War, as a commander to be trusted with the fullest discretion in the management of all the troops under him. Before that, while they highly appreciated him as a commander to execute, they felt a little nervous about giving him too much discretion.—General Grant to Author, June, 1878. As for his soldiers, they declared, referring to the Democratic desire for compromise, that Sheridan was the bearer of Peace propositions to Jefferson Davis from the North. Grant had returned to City Point on the 19th of September, and on the 20th, at two P. M., he telegraphed to Sheridan: I have just received the news of your great victory, and ordered each of the armies here to fire a salute of one hundred guns in honor of it. . . If practicable, push your success and make all you can of it. He was anxious that the full effect of the victory should be reaped at the West as well as the East, and inquired of Halleck: Has the news of Gen
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 1
y's force had been sent west of the Alleghanies, and Grant meant to lose no opportunity. On the 29th, he ordered Sheridan: If it is ascertained certainly that Breckenridge has been detached to go into Western Virginia, attack the remaining forces vigorously with every man you have; and if successful in routing them, follow up your success with the Sixth and Nineteenth corps, and send Crook to meet Breckenridge. But Sheridan replied on the same day: There is not one word of truth in the report of Breckenridge being in West Virginia; and then, with his usual spirit, he added: I believe no troops have yet left the Valley, but I believe they will, and that iBreckenridge being in West Virginia; and then, with his usual spirit, he added: I believe no troops have yet left the Valley, but I believe they will, and that it will be their last campaign in the Shenandoah. They came to invade, and have failed. They must leave, or cross the Potomac. The next day he said: If Early has detached troops for Richmond, I will attack him vigorously. It was with words like these that the chief and the subaltern inspired each other: they were evidently made
William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 1
ce, and lost no time in adapting his plans to the actual emergencies. On the 8th of September, Sherman had entered Atlanta in person, and on the 10th, he was instructed: As soon as your men are suffetired, and Early had followed him; so that on the Potomac also, the prospect was gloomy. Even Sherman's success, gratifying as it was, seemed isolated; the country had no idea that it had been facirsonal one, as close and as unselfish on both sides, as that already existing between Grant and Sherman. The rebel government was not long in learning that a new commander had superseded the crowds the East, and inquired of Halleck: Has the news of General Sheridan's battle been sent to General Sherman? If not, please telegraph him. Neither did he forget that his forces on the Shenandoah wee to Staunton was abundantly supplied with forage and grain. On the 26th, Grant telegraphed to Sherman: I have evidence that Sheridan's victory has created the greatest consternation and alarm for t
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 1
Butler, on Bermuda Hundred, the rebel line was extremely strong, and like that north of the James, was intended to be held with a comparatively small force, until in an emergency reinforcements could arrive; but south and east of Petersburg, Lee kept his main army, and here he relied for defence on men rather than works, though here also the fortifications were elaborate and formidable. When the national forces crossed the James, in June, and Smith advanced against Petersburg, although Beauregard came up in time to save the town, the defences on the south and east were captured. Breastworks were thrown up in the night, in rear of the former position, and these were held until Lee's army arrived; but the original works were never regained. For about a mile and a half the new rebel line followed a ridge a quarter of a mile outside the town, and was made exceedingly strong. At intervals of two or three hundred yards, or more, according to the nature of the ground, were batteries, t
Washington. This statement of Lee's orders to Early and Anderson is taken from McCabe, who gives it still more minutely. Early, however, says not a word to indicate that he was expected a second time to cross the Potomac, for if he admitted this, he would have to admit that he was foiled. This plan, however, had been frustrated by Sheridan's prompt advance into the Valley, and Grant's operations north of the James. The intention, so far as I can learn, was to send a column direct from Culpeper to the Potomac, and Early to advance at the same time from Martinsburg. This was frustrated by Early being compelled to fall back, and your operations on the north side of the James.—Sheridan to Grant, August, 20. Sheridan had moved from Halltown on the 10th of August, and Early at once fell back as far as Strasburg, to which point he was followed by the national army, both forces arriving at Cedar creek on the 12th. On the 13th, Early retired a few miles further, to Fisher's Hill. A
A. J. Smith (search for this): chapter 1
mpleted the circuit of the town. In front of Butler, on Bermuda Hundred, the rebel line was extremely strong, and like that north of the James, was intended to be held with a comparatively small force, until in an emergency reinforcements could arrive; but south and east of Petersburg, Lee kept his main army, and here he relied for defence on men rather than works, though here also the fortifications were elaborate and formidable. When the national forces crossed the James, in June, and Smith advanced against Petersburg, although Beauregard came up in time to save the town, the defences on the south and east were captured. Breastworks were thrown up in the night, in rear of the former position, and these were held until Lee's army arrived; but the original works were never regained. For about a mile and a half the new rebel line followed a ridge a quarter of a mile outside the town, and was made exceedingly strong. At intervals of two or three hundred yards, or more, according
A. T. A. Torbert (search for this): chapter 1
lan Sheridan's attack original success of rebels Sheridan restores the day Torbert's cavalry charge victory of national forces retreat of Early, whirling throuth spirit, forcing the enemy rapidly from his position, and at the same moment Torbert's. cavalry came sweeping up the Martinsburg road, overlapping Early's left, anr. Then returning to the right, where the battle was still raging, he ordered Torbert to charge with the remainder of the cavalry. Torbert advanced simultaneously Torbert advanced simultaneously with the infantry. The country was entirely open, and the movement could be distinctly seen by the enemy. Unable to resist any longer, crowded on both flanks, and main national line moved up in front of the rebel position. At the same time Torbert, with the greater part of the cavalry, was sent up the Luray valley on the lef but without being able to bring on an engagement. The rebels moved fast, and Torbert had not arrived with the cavalry in time to check them. He had been detained
nce of the seizure of the Weldon road. The disaster of Burnside had left an impression that could not easily be effaced, and all the subsequent manoeuvres on the right and left were, to the multitude, unintelligible. It was only perceived that Hancock had twice been moved to the north bank of the James, and twice withdrawn. Not only was the fact unnoticed that by these manoeuvres the extension on the left had been made practicable; but that extension itself was looked upon as of no especial consequence. Hancock's check at Ream's station more than balanced, in the public mind, all the advantages of Warren's advance. In the same way Sheridan as yet appeared to have accomplished nothing in the Valley; in fact he had retired, and Early had followed him; so that on the Potomac also, the prospect was gloomy. Even Sherman's success, gratifying as it was, seemed isolated; the country had no idea that it had been facilitated by the very movements at the East which were deemed so unfort
Emory Upton (search for this): chapter 1
on the right and left of the infantry. The approach to Winchester by the Berryville road is through a difficult gorge, and it was nine o'clock before an advance in line could be effected. The attack was then made in handsome style, without cover; but by this time Early's two divisions from Martinsburg had come upon the ground, and the rebels were not only able to hold their own, but made a countercharge, and the national centre was forced back for a while. Sheridan, however, threw forward Upton's brigade and struck the attacking column in flank, when the rebels in turn were driven back, and the national line was re-established. The enemy's principal strength was opposite Sheridan's right, where the Martinsburg road comes in, and Crook was now directed to find the left of the rebel line, strike it in flank or rear, and break it up, while Sheridan made a left half wheel of the main line of battle to support him. Crook advanced with spirit, forcing the enemy rapidly from his posit
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