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William T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 11
ssassination of Lincoln negotiations between Sherman and Johnston manoeuvres of rebels Sherman'sepaired together to the place of rendezvous. Sherman, however, objected to the presence of a membearry out the above programme. The next day Sherman published an order to his troops, beginning: e unanimous in condemning the propositions of Sherman. Indeed, their language was so vehement thatommand at Richmond: The truce entered into by Sherman will be ended as soon as I can reach Raleigh. Arriving at Raleigh on the 24th, he informed Sherman as delicately as possible of the disapproval ton immediately communicated the substance of Sherman's dispatches to Davis, and asked for further y, and the persistency with which he defended Sherman, saved that illustrious soldier from insult, Rapidan, while at the West, Banks was to meet Sherman, both marching towards Mobile. All were combife whom the epoch produced, on one hand, and Sherman and Sheridan, with their eminent executive mi[44 more...]
Washington (search for this): chapter 11
fulfill these terms, we individually and officially pledge ourselves to promptly obtain the necessary authority, and to carry out the above programme. The next day Sherman published an order to his troops, beginning: The general commanding announces to the army a suspension of hostilities, and an agreement with General Johnston and high officials, which, when formally ratified, will make peace from the Potomac to the Rio Grande. A messenger was instantly sent to convey these terms to Washington, under cover to Grant. The dispatches were received by the general-in-chief on the night of April 21st. He at once perceived that the terms were such as could not possibly be approved, and accordingly wrote the following note to the Secretary of War: I have received and just completed reading the dispatches brought by the special messenger from General Sherman. They are of such importance that I think immediate action should be taken on them, and that it should be done by the President
me. He made all his plans and combinations with this in view. The scope of those plans included the entire republic. The army of the Potomac at the East and Sherman's forces at the West constituted the two great motive powers; but in Virginia, Butler on the James and Sigel in the Valley were to assist Meade on the Rapidan, while at the West, Banks was to meet Sherman, both marching towards Mobile. All were combined and directed with a common purpose and a central aim. These combinations were sometimes interrupted or thwarted in their development. Grant and Sherman each met many obstacles before either sat down in front of the strategical objective point of his army; Butler and Sigel both failed in their cooperation in Virginia, while Banks failed to cooperate at all before Mobile. Grant himself entered upon an encounter as terrible as that of Christian with Apollyon in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. The struggle was prolonged and bitter, and the national commander receive
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 11
tain this authority. Immediately after the close of the interview Johnston telegraphed to Breckenridge, who had proceeded as far as Charlotte, with the fugitive government. Breckenridge came promBreckenridge came promptly at the summons, together with Reagan, the Postmaster-General of the rebel cabinet. A memorandum was then drawn up of the terms which Davis and his advisers considered desirable, and, on the 18th, Johnston and Breckenridge repaired together to the place of rendezvous. Sherman, however, objected to the presence of a member of the Richmond cabinet, whereupon Johnston proposed that BreckenridgeBreckenridge should be admitted to the interview in his capacity of major-general in the rebel army. To this Sherman consented, and the terms written out by Reagan were presented by Breckenridge and Johnston. SBreckenridge and Johnston. Sherman, however, preferred to write his own, which were substantially the same as those proposed by the rebels. His paper differed from mine only in being fuller.—Johnston's Military Narrative, p.
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 11
e entire republic. The army of the Potomac at the East and Sherman's forces at the West constituted the two great motive powers; but in Virginia, Butler on the James and Sigel in the Valley were to assist Meade on the Rapidan, while at the West, Banks was to meet Sherman, both marching towards Mobile. All were combined and directed with a common purpose and a central aim. These combinations were sometimes interrupted or thwarted in their development. Grant and Sherman each met many obstacles before either sat down in front of the strategical objective point of his army; Butler and Sigel both failed in their cooperation in Virginia, while Banks failed to cooperate at all before Mobile. Grant himself entered upon an encounter as terrible as that of Christian with Apollyon in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. The struggle was prolonged and bitter, and the national commander received as well as inflicted appalling loss; but he persisted in his advance amid carnage and assaults w
ength was wasted, their struggles vain, their endurance failed. Next came Sherman's march and Thomas's defence; then the two attacks on Wilmington; and at last the consummation began to dawn. Out the horizon. Sherman strode across the continent and then marched northward, driving Johnston; Thomas destroyed or scattered Hood; Sheridan had beaten and battered Early's army, literally, into piecost heart, that the lesser rebels yielded. Johnston was absolutely surrounded, for Stoneman and Thomas and Wilson were in his rear, while Sherman was in front, and Meade and Sheridan were approachingtwo greatest subordinates, whose ability was conspicuous and whose aid was important. Meade and Thomas, especially, were excellent commanders; men of the calibre and with many of the characteristics ient service. Any one of the three was admirable in defensive situations. Meade at Gettysburg, Thomas at Chickamauga, Lee in the Wilderness, achieved a splendid fame; but no one of the three possess
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 11
of expenses of government rejoicing of country assassination of Lincoln negotiations between Sherman and Johnston manoeuvres of rebels rview, Sherman received a telegram announcing the assassination of Lincoln, and, as soon as the two commanders were alone, he showed the disp hostilities at the earliest possible moment. The instructions of Lincoln to Grant on the 3rd of March, communicated by Stanton, were to bency at Appomattox, and was aware of the charity which had animated Lincoln's great heart. Everything conspired to make him accede too readilt was indeed peculiarly and fortunately placed. He stood between Lincoln and Stanton, the two great men in civil life whom the epoch produces. He had, indeed, magnificent men on both sides to deal with: Lincoln, with his exceptional fitness for his place, his political sagacitsessed. He did not lack the energy of Stanton nor the sympathy of Lincoln with the people; his strategy was not inferior to that of Sherman,
Montgomery (search for this): chapter 11
together his numbers amounted to seven thousand. On the 1st of April, Wilson encountered this enemy at Ebenezer Church, and drove him across the Cahawba river in confusion. On the 2nd, he attacked and captured the fortified city of Selma, took thirty-two guns and three thousand prisoners, and destroyed the arsenal, armory, machine-shops, and a vast quantity of stores. On the 4th, he captured and destroyed Tuscaloosa. On the 10th, he crossed the Alabama river, and, on the 14th, occupied Montgomery, which the enemy had abandoned. Here he divided his force, sending one portion upon West Point, and the other against Columbus, in Georgia. Both these places were assaulted and captured on the 16th of April, the latter by a gallant night attack, in which Generals Upton and Winslow particularly distinguished themselves. This was the last battle of the war. On the 21st, Macon was surrendered, with sixty field guns, twelve thousand militia-men, and five generals, including Howell Cobb,
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 11
con; on the 4th of May, Richard Taylor surrendered all the rebel forces east of the Mississippi. On the 11th of May, Jefferson Davis, disguised as a woman and in flight, was captured at Irwinsville, Georgia; and on the 26th of the same month, Kirby Smith surrendered his entire command west of the Mississippi river. On that day the last organized rebel force disappeared from the territory of the United States. Every man who had borne arms against the government was a prisoner. One hundred anthe preparations and combinations which had preceded the end; how absolute the execution of the scheme devised a year before. Lee surrendered because he had nothing else to do. He could not run away. Johnston and Maury and Richard Taylor and Kirby Smith surrendered for exactly the same reason. The various victories were not hap-hazard; it was not that each man chanced to come out right. All the arrangements were made in advance. Army after army came up to surrender, like the pieces in ches
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 11
ies, Sherman advanced against Smithfield, and Johnston at once retreated rapidly through Raleigh, wh3th. On the 14th, he received a message from Johnston, dictated by Jefferson Davis, who was living so offered to order Stoneman, now in front of Johnston's army, to suspend any devastation or destrucply to this was received until the 16th, when Johnston agreed to meet Sherman on the following day a by Reagan were presented by Breckenridge and Johnston. Sherman, however, preferred to write his owGrant and Lee. All acts of war on the part of Johnston's army were to cease at once; all arms and puention, and referred only to the surrender of Johnston's command. The great civil questions of amnen of Johnston's army were paroled. Yet General Johnston, one of the most honorable of the rebel c was checked by news of the armistice between Johnston and Sherman, which included Wilson's command.d nothing else to do. He could not run away. Johnston and Maury and Richard Taylor and Kirby Smith [30 more...]
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