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hnston to obtain this authority. Immediately after the close of the interview Johnston telegraphed to Breckenridge, who had proceeded as far as Charlotte, with the fugitive government. Breckenridge came promptly at the summons, together with Reagan, the Postmaster-General of the rebel cabinet. A memorandum was then drawn up of the terms which Davis and his advisers considered desirable, and, on the 18th, Johnston and Breckenridge repaired together to the place of rendezvous. Sherman, howeed to the presence of a member of the Richmond cabinet, whereupon Johnston proposed that Breckenridge should be admitted to the interview in his capacity of major-general in the rebel army. To this Sherman consented, and the terms written out by Reagan were presented by Breckenridge and Johnston. Sherman, however, preferred to write his own, which were substantially the same as those proposed by the rebels. His paper differed from mine only in being fuller.—Johnston's Military Narrative, p.
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 11
on the morning of the 15th, at the moment of the triumph of that cause of which he had been the devoted servant as well as the indefatigable and beloved leader, and of which he now became the most exalted and lamented martyr. His successor, Andrew Johnson, was inaugurated on the same day. These astounding events imposed unforeseen and important duties on all connected with the government, and Grant, of course, remained at the capital. Meanwhile, the expected sequel to the surrender of Le sanction of the government to procure the indictment of Lee and others for the crime of treason. The former rebel chief at once appealed to Grant, who went in person to the President, and protested verbally and in writing against the measure. Johnson, however, was obstinate, and Grant finally declared that he would resign his commission in the army if the paroles which he had granted should be violated. This determination was conclusive. The proceedings were abandoned, and the communicatio
J. H. Wilson (search for this): chapter 11
o their designed development. The forces of Stoneman and Canby moved on the 20th, and those of Wilson on The 22nd of March. No formidable army opposed either of these commanders, for their expediti and four thousand prisoners; but the bulk of the garrison, nine thousand in number, escaped. Wilson's command, consisting of twelve thousand five hundred mounted men, marched south from the Tennesousand cavalry-men, and altogether his numbers amounted to seven thousand. On the 1st of April, Wilson encountered this enemy at Ebenezer Church, and drove him across the Cahawba river in confusion. cavalry career was checked by news of the armistice between Johnston and Sherman, which included Wilson's command. In twenty-eight days the cavalry had marched five hundred and twenty-five miles, andthat the lesser rebels yielded. Johnston was absolutely surrounded, for Stoneman and Thomas and Wilson were in his rear, while Sherman was in front, and Meade and Sheridan were approaching from the N
ners, and destroyed the arsenal, armory, machine-shops, and a vast quantity of stores. On the 4th, he captured and destroyed Tuscaloosa. On the 10th, he crossed the Alabama river, and, on the 14th, occupied Montgomery, which the enemy had abandoned. Here he divided his force, sending one portion upon West Point, and the other against Columbus, in Georgia. Both these places were assaulted and captured on the 16th of April, the latter by a gallant night attack, in which Generals Upton and Winslow particularly distinguished themselves. This was the last battle of the war. On the 21st, Macon was surrendered, with sixty field guns, twelve thousand militia-men, and five generals, including Howell Cobb, who had been a member of Buchanan's cabinet, and afterwards rebel governor of Georgia. At Macon, the cavalry career was checked by news of the armistice between Johnston and Sherman, which included Wilson's command. In twenty-eight days the cavalry had marched five hundred and twent
e Steele invested Blakely, above the town. Both these places were taken on the 9th of April, Blakely by assault, and after severe and gallant fighting on both sides; and on the 11th, Mobile was evacuated. In these operations two hundred guns were captured, and four thousand prisoners; but the bulk of the garrison, nine thousand in number, escaped. Wilson's command, consisting of twelve thousand five hundred mounted men, marched south from the Tennessee river into the heart of Alabama. Forrest was in front with a motley force, made up of conscripts and local militia: old men and boys, clergymen, physicians, editors, judges—the people usually left behind in time of war. To these the rebel commander added two or three thousand cavalry-men, and altogether his numbers amounted to seven thousand. On the 1st of April, Wilson encountered this enemy at Ebenezer Church, and drove him across the Cahawba river in confusion. On the 2nd, he attacked and captured the fortified city of Selma
E. R. S. Canby (search for this): chapter 11
rant excitement of country-grant's friendship for Sherman movements of Stoneman operations of Canby evacuation of Mobile operations of cavalry surrender of all the rebel armies capture of Jeffand to contrast this with what he calls Grant's, of 180,000 men; Sherman's, of 110,000 at least; Canby's, 60,000—odds of seventeen or eighteen to one. Over 70,000 rebels were surrendered by Johnstf the general-in-chief had proceeded to their designed development. The forces of Stoneman and Canby moved on the 20th, and those of Wilson on The 22nd of March. No formidable army opposed either as checked by the news of the surrender of both the great rebel armies. On the 27th of March, Canby's force arrived before Mobile; it was in three divisions, commanded by A. J. Smith, Gordon Grang and Sheridan were approaching from the North. The troops that escaped from Mobile were between Canby and the cavalry, and if they had tried could have done no better than their fellows. The rebell
Richard Taylor (search for this): chapter 11
, of 180,000 men; Sherman's, of 110,000 at least; Canby's, 60,000—odds of seventeen or eighteen to one. Over 70,000 rebels were surrendered by Johnston and Richard Taylor alone. During these negotiations Grant kept himself carefully in the background. He was not present at any interview with Johnston, remaining at Raleigh enumeration of successive surrenders. On the 14th of April, Johnston made his first overtures to Sherman; on the 21st, Cobb yielded Macon; on the 4th of May, Richard Taylor surrendered all the rebel forces east of the Mississippi. On the 11th of May, Jefferson Davis, disguised as a woman and in flight, was captured at Irwinsvillabsolute the execution of the scheme devised a year before. Lee surrendered because he had nothing else to do. He could not run away. Johnston and Maury and Richard Taylor and Kirby Smith surrendered for exactly the same reason. The various victories were not hap-hazard; it was not that each man chanced to come out right. All
Warren Sheridan (search for this): chapter 11
neral plan consummation completeness of combinations victory not the result of brute force faithful support of government Executive greatness of Sherman and Sheridan characteristics of Meade, Thomas, and Lee further traits of Lee fitting representative of the rebellion characteristics of national and rebel soldiers necesday, he telegraphed to Halleck, who had been placed in command at Richmond: The truce entered into by Sherman will be ended as soon as I can reach Raleigh. Move Sheridan with his cavalry toward Greensboro, North Carolina, as soon as possible. I think it will be well to send one corps of infantry also, the whole under Sheridan. Sheridan. Arriving at Raleigh on the 24th, he informed Sherman as delicately as possible of the disapproval of his memorandum, and directed him to impose upon Johnston the same terms which had already been laid down to Lee. Sherman was thoroughly subordinate, and at once notified Johnston that their arrangement had not been ratified. I hav
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 11
is collapse of the revolt-sagacity of Grant Gratitude of rebels acclamations of country review of Grant's career Educated by earlier events for chief command his view of situation Comprehensiveness of plan character and result of Wilderness campaign desperation of rebels development of general plan consummation completeness of combinations victory not the result of brute force faithful support of government Executive greatness of Sherman and Sheridan characteristics of Meade, Thomas, and Lee further traits of Lee fitting representative of the rebellion characteristics of national and rebel soldiers necessity of transcendent efforts characteristics of a commander—in—chief in civil war nations never saved without a leader Grant protects Lee from trial for treason. The surrender at Appomattox court-house ended the war. The interview with Lee occurred on the 9th of April, and on the 13th Grant arrived at Washington, and at once set about reducing the military expe
P. H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 11
ate effect, formidable at first to an adversary; but, when opposed by soldiers like Sherman and Sheridan and Grant, their strength was wasted, their struggles vain, their endurance failed. Next camthe continent and then marched northward, driving Johnston; Thomas destroyed or scattered Hood; Sheridan had beaten and battered Early's army, literally, into pieces. Only the command in front of Ric for Stoneman and Thomas and Wilson were in his rear, while Sherman was in front, and Meade and Sheridan were approaching from the North. The troops that escaped from Mobile were between Canby and th Stanton, the two great men in civil life whom the epoch produced, on one hand, and Sherman and Sheridan, with their eminent executive military genius, on the other. He participated in the authority th the people; his strategy was not inferior to that of Sherman, and he proved himself equal to Sheridan in that power of audacious and skillful combination in the presence of the enemy which, above a
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