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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir.

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litical vision and compelled political action. Both parties to the contest wanted to use the prestige of his name; both laid their arguments before him and sought to secure his support. The President was full of devices and schemes not always Zzz Zzz creditable. He began by trying to wheedle Grant. He sent him constant personal and familiar notes and cards—an unusual courtesy, almost a condescension, from a President. With these messages he often enclosed slips from the Southern newsZzz creditable. He began by trying to wheedle Grant. He sent him constant personal and familiar notes and cards—an unusual courtesy, almost a condescension, from a President. With these messages he often enclosed slips from the Southern newspapers, complimenting Grant on his magnanimity, and predicting that he was sure to support the President in upholding the rights of the South. Two of these notes I preserved. They show the intimate footing that Johnson desired to maintain. From the President. General U. S. Grant—Present. Will General Grant be kind enough to call as he passes on his way home, or such other time as may be most convenient. Sincerely, Andrew Johnson. I would be pleased to see General Grant th<
s, indeed, far more than tact, it was political and patriotic wisdom. And his course throughout all these proceedings was entirely his own. He listened to the advice, or opinions, or persuasions of those who felt they had a right to offer either, but every decision was the result of his own judgment, of his own instinct of what was right. He seemed to me at the time greater than in any emergency of the war, and when I look back upon both crises now, I remain of this opinion still. During these contentions Congress created, or rather revived, the grade of General in the Army for Grant. His nomination was announced to him by the Secretary of War in the following letter: War Department, Washington City, July 25, 1866. General,—The President has signed the bill reviving the grade of General. I have made out and laid your nomination before him, and it will be sent to the Senate this morning. Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton. Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant. Zzz
had been accomplished he might as well have remained at St. Louis. He declares in his memoirs: I am sure this whole movement was got up for the purpose of getting General Grant away from Washington. Grant always attributed the conception of the scheme to Seward. About this time Grant received the following letter, which I opened and handed to him. After reading it he threw it into the fire, but I snatched it from the flames and thus preserved it: October, 1866. General,—I feel it to be my duty to warn you to be on your guard against assassination, also to be very careful of what you eat, and where you eat, for the next sixty days. I believe that the Knights have spotted you, Sheridan, and Sherman. I have written them to be careful. My warning may not reach them. If you can warn them do so. As ever, yours, Tewandah, the Scout. Nothing more was ever heard on the subject, but the letter is curious, as showing the fears that some entertained at this time. Zzz
, appointing you Secretary of War ad interim, and informing me of your acceptance of the appointment, has been received. Under a sense of public duty I am compelled to deny the President's right, under the Constitution and laws of the United Zzz Zzz States, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or to authorize any other person to enter upon the discharge of the duties of that office, or to require me to transfer to you or any other person the records, books, papers, and otherZzz States, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or to authorize any other person to enter upon the discharge of the duties of that office, or to require me to transfer to you or any other person the records, books, papers, and other property in my official custody and charge as Secretary of War. But inasmuch as the President has assumed to suspend me from the office as Secretary of War, and you have notified me of your acceptance of the appointment of Secretary of War ad interim, I have no alternative but to submit, under protest, to the superior force of the President. You will please accept my acknowledgment of the kind terms in which you have notified me of your acceptance of the President's appointment, and my c
e words to express my attachment to General Grant and his family. I have not gone to see him, as I could only bring additional distress to them, and I want to remember him as I knew him in good health. Grant always regarded the French attempt to establish an empire in Mexico as a part of the effort to subvert our own Republic. At the close of the war, on the very day of the grand review at Washington, he dispatched Sheridan with secret orders to the Rio Grande, to watch the frontier. Zzz He hoped to be able to bring the Administration up to his own views, if the Emperor delayed; and Sheridan was directed to be ready for any emergency. He performed his part, and when the question was settled, and the French were withdrawn, Grant left him in command at New Orleans. Here he was found when the President's policy was rejected by the people; and when the measures which Johnson opposed became law, Sheridan, like Grant, set himself to obeying the law. Johnson, of course, was pro
uisite breeding imaginable. Shortly before these occurrences Mrs. Stanton had visited City Point, and I chanced to ask her some question about the President's wife. I do not visit Mrs. Lincoln, was the reply. But I thought I must have been mistaken; the wife of the Secretary of War must visit the wife of the President; and I renewed my inquiry. Understand me, sir? she repeated; I do not go to the White House; I do not visit Mrs. Lincoln. I was not at all intimate with Mrs. Stanton, Zzz and this remark was so extraordinary that I never forgot it; but I understood it afterward. Mrs. Lincoln continued her conduct toward Mrs. Grant, who strove to placate her, and then Mrs. Lincoln became more outrageous still. She once rebuked Mrs. Grant for sitting in her presence. How dare you be seated, she said, until I invite you. Altogether it was a hateful experience at that tremendous crisis in the nation's history, for all this was just before the army started on its last campai
or the publishers. It was submitted for a similar review also to Generals Porter and Babcock, two of the staff colleagues of the author. In addition to this, all those chapters treating of events in which Generals Sherman and Sheridan held detached commands were submitted to those officers. The author had access to the Government and captured and purchased archives. He also read and consulted all that was published on both sides, before and during the time he was writing this book, with the view of getting the truth. So far as I am capable of judging, this is a true history of the events of which it treats. The opinions expressed of men are the author's own, and for which no one else is responsible. Very Truly, U. S. Grant. P. S. General Geo. H. Thomas was dead before the events in which he held detached commands took place, otherwise, those chapters relative to events after March, 1864, in which he took a leading part would have been submitted to him. U. S. G. Zzz
Russell Young (search for this): chapter 36
f his conduct at this time. After a stay of a few days in Chicago, I returned to the East, and shortly afterward Mr. Russell Young, who had accompanied Grant during the greater part of his European and Asiatic tour, went out to visit him at Galenn which he represented the views of those of Grant's friends who were averse to his standing again. Mrs. Grant suspected Young's purpose, and tried to thwart it; and the discussions between Young and the General were usually carried on in her abseailure embittered his feeling toward all who contributed to it. This remark has no reference to Young. Grant followed Young's counsel, and in the end perhaps wished that others had done so too. It was at his urgent advice that Mr. Young was afteMr. Young was afterward appointed by President Arthur, Minister to China. But though Grant's disappointment was acute it was not manifested with any loss of dignity. The world knows how soon he accepted defeat and fell into line as a follower in that party of whi
Russell Young (search for this): chapter 50
ner; Mr. Smalley, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, invited him to breakfast, and Mr. Russell Young, of the New York Herald, to dinner; the Reform Club and the United Service Club gave him do one else so constantly and familiarly on subjects of general importance and interest. Mr. Russell Young, the European correspondent of the New York Herald, accompanied General Grant during the winter of 1877-8. Mr. Young, although a warm political adherent and a personal admirer, had hardly before this been intimate with Grant; but during this winter he became one of his closest companions e criticised, but criticism will do no harm so long as your facts are right. My opinion is that Young's publication of table talks will add many thousands to the number of readers of your book. PeoNew York. Yours, U. S. Grant. Letter no. Sixty-five. General Grant recommended Mr. Russell Young to the new Administration, either for the mission to Mexico or to China or Japan.
J. H. Work (search for this): chapter 51
ris to thank him; but the Countess de Paris having given birth to a daughter four days ago only, I cannot leave her presently. Believe me, my dear General, Yours Truly, L. P. D. Orleans, Comte de Paris. No. Fifteen. General Grant to J. H. Work, Esq. Mr. Work had a copy of my Military History of Grant especially bound for his library, and asked General Grant to write something in it to attest his opinion of its merits; and this letter is the inscription it contains. New YorkMr. Work had a copy of my Military History of Grant especially bound for his library, and asked General Grant to write something in it to attest his opinion of its merits; and this letter is the inscription it contains. New York City, Dec. 22, 1881. J. H. work, Esq.,—This book was revised by me, chapter by chapter, as it was being prepared for the publishers. It was submitted for a similar review also to Generals Porter and Babcock, two of the staff colleagues of the author. In addition to this, all those chapters treating of events in which Generals Sherman and Sheridan held detached commands were submitted to those officers. The author had access to the Government and captured and purchased archives. He also r
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