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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir.

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Palermo (Italy) (search for this): chapter 1
sing so well. Hope Vol. II. will soon be complete, and that the book will find large sale. No doubt but Governor Fish will take great pleasure in aiding you in your next book. He has all the data, so far as his own department was concerned. It was this habit to sum up the proceedings of each day before leaving his office, and to keep that information for his private perusal. To-day we ascend Mt. Vesuvius, to-morrow visit Pompeii and Herculaneum. About Saturday, the 22d, start for Palermo, thence to Malta, where we will probably spend the 25th. From there we go to Alexandria and up the Nile. That is about as far as I have definitely planned, but think on our return from the Nile we will go to Joppa, and visit Jerusalem from there; possibly Damascus and other points of interest also, and take the ship again at Beyrout. The next point will be Smyrna, then Constantinople. I am beginning to enjoy traveling, and if the money holds out, or if Consolidated Virginia mining stock
Herculaneum (Italy) (search for this): chapter 1
eak about me. I am glad to see you are progressing so well. Hope Vol. II. will soon be complete, and that the book will find large sale. No doubt but Governor Fish will take great pleasure in aiding you in your next book. He has all the data, so far as his own department was concerned. It was this habit to sum up the proceedings of each day before leaving his office, and to keep that information for his private perusal. To-day we ascend Mt. Vesuvius, to-morrow visit Pompeii and Herculaneum. About Saturday, the 22d, start for Palermo, thence to Malta, where we will probably spend the 25th. From there we go to Alexandria and up the Nile. That is about as far as I have definitely planned, but think on our return from the Nile we will go to Joppa, and visit Jerusalem from there; possibly Damascus and other points of interest also, and take the ship again at Beyrout. The next point will be Smyrna, then Constantinople. I am beginning to enjoy traveling, and if the money hold
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
iege of Richmond by his side, and was present at the fall of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee. During the next four years, those of the administration of Andrew Johnson, I was his confidential secretary and aide-de-camp. I opened all his letters, answered many that were seen by no other man, and necessarily knew his opinions on most subjects closely and intimately. Wherever he went at this time I accompanied him. In his tour through the South after the close of the war, in his visit to Canada, his journey over the entire North, which was one long triumphal procession; his stay at his little Galena home; during the stormy days of Reconstruction and the struggle between Congress and the President; at the time of the removal of Stanton; the impeachment of Johnson; the attempt to send General Grant out of the country; in the Presidential campaign of 1868; down to the preparations for his first administration, I was constantly in his society and confidence. Enjoying these opportuni
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
-general was then before Congress, and I had carried messages to him presaging its success. He discussed the subject freely, told me he felt no anxiety for the promotion, and would take no step to secure it; but, if it came, he would do his best to fulfill the higher duties it imposed. If otherwise, he would neither be disappointed nor in any way less devoted to the cause he served. On the 3d of March he was ordered to Washington, and on the 11th assumed command of the armies of the United States. He at once assigned me to duty as military secretary, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel on his staff. I remained with him in this capacity till the end of the war; went through the Wilderness campaign and the siege of Richmond by his side, and was present at the fall of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee. During the next four years, those of the administration of Andrew Johnson, I was his confidential secretary and aide-de-camp. I opened all his letters, answered many that were s
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he next four years, those of the administration of Andrew Johnson, I was his confidential secretary and aide-de-camp. I opened all his letters, answered many that were seen by no other man, and necessarily knew his opinions on most subjects closely and intimately. Wherever he went at this time I accompanied him. In his tour through the South after the close of the war, in his visit to Canada, his journey over the entire North, which was one long triumphal procession; his stay at his little Galena home; during the stormy days of Reconstruction and the struggle between Congress and the President; at the time of the removal of Stanton; the impeachment of Johnson; the attempt to send General Grant out of the country; in the Presidential campaign of 1868; down to the preparations for his first administration, I was constantly in his society and confidence. Enjoying these opportunities for knowing the man, and engaged at the time in writing his military history, I naturally took to stud
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
on his staff. He had never seen me at the time, and made the application on the recommendation of General James H. Wilson, his inspector-general. I was then a captain serving on the staff of General T. W. Sherman, in Banks's campaign against Port Hudson. My orders did not reach me till the 27th of May, just as the assault on Port Hudson was beginning. I was wounded in that assault, and unable to report to General Grant in person until the following February. I thus first saw him at NashvilPort Hudson was beginning. I was wounded in that assault, and unable to report to General Grant in person until the following February. I thus first saw him at Nashville, where he had established his headquarters, after the battle of Chattanooga. Our relations at once became more than cordial. I was still on crutches, and he gave me a desk in his own room at headquarters, threw open his entire official correspondence to me, and delighted from the first to tell me all the details of his battles and campaigns. The bill creating the grade of lieutenant-general was then before Congress, and I had carried messages to him presaging its success. He discussed
a skillful simulator, but he could dissimulate as well as any man that ever lived; that is, he could prevent all but those who were absolutely closest to him, and sometimes these, from penetrating further than he wished into his thoughts or purposes or desires. I had not seen him for several years when he visited Europe, and I was very much struck, at that time, with the growth and breadth of his intellect. I was with him at the tables of kings; I saw him in the company of the greatest European statesmen; at more than one brilliant court; and he rose to an equality that the foremost recognized. On his return to America, I was again very much with him, almost, if possible, in a closer intimacy than ever before, and I was convinced that he had learned profoundly by his experience of the Presidency and his wonderful journey around the world. I saw him almost to the last, in his grim struggle with the greatest of all foes, and then too I recognized that the massive qualities of th
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ty on his staff. He had never seen me at the time, and made the application on the recommendation of General James H. Wilson, his inspector-general. I was then a captain serving on the staff of General T. W. Sherman, in Banks's campaign against Port Hudson. My orders did not reach me till the 27th of May, just as the assault on Port Hudson was beginning. I was wounded in that assault, and unable to report to General Grant in person until the following February. I thus first saw him at Nashville, where he had established his headquarters, after the battle of Chattanooga. Our relations at once became more than cordial. I was still on crutches, and he gave me a desk in his own room at headquarters, threw open his entire official correspondence to me, and delighted from the first to tell me all the details of his battles and campaigns. The bill creating the grade of lieutenant-general was then before Congress, and I had carried messages to him presaging its success. He discusse
Chapter 2: The terms at Appomattox. The terms at Appomattox were neither dictated by the Government, nor suggested by Mr. Lincoln, nor inspired by any subordinate. Early in March, 1864, the Administration had positively prohibited General Grant from attempting to settle or even discuss the conditions of peace; and at the interview between Mr. Lincoln and the commissioners sent out from Richmond in February Grant was not permitted to be present. There was a determination on the part of Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Stanton to exclude the military authorities altogether from the final settlement, after submission should be secured. During Mr. Lincoln's stay at City Point, prior to the final movements of the war, he had many conversations with Grant, but said nothing to indicate definitely what steps he intended to take at the close. Those steps were probably uncertain in his own mind, for, like all sagacious statesmen, he left much to be determined by circumstances as they might arise.
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 2
e Administration had positively prohibited General Grant from attempting to settle or even discuss nts of the war, he had many conversations with Grant, but said nothing to indicate definitely what came up and conferred for an hour or two with Grant in the captured town, there was no definite lierence. They were the legitimate outgrowth of Grant's judgment and feeling; the consequence of ally for the embodiment had arrived. In this way Grant always did his greatest things. It may be strours, in sight of their soldiers. Lee assured Grant of the profound impression the stipulations ofs of the captured officers had already visited Grant, many of them his comrades at West Point, in tld hardly be the subject of official letters. Grant was accustomed to employ his staff officers onrning to Washington Lee requested me to ask of Grant whether the soldiers captured at Sailor's Cree child. I learned the fact and reported it to Grant, who at once directed me to enclose a formal e[5 more...]
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