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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir.

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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rtain to be on his side. The next day he met Lee again at the picket lines between the armies, and the two generals sat on their horses and discussed the condition of the South for hours, in sight of their soldiers. Lee assured Grant of the profound impression the stipulations of the surrender had made upon his army, and declared that the entire South would respond to the clemency he had displayed. Scores of the captured officers had already visited Grant, many of them his comrades at West Point, in the Mexican war, or on the Indian frontier, and thanked him for their swords, their liberty, and the immunity from civil prosecution which he had secured them. Later on the same day he set out for Washington. General Ord accompanied him as far as City Point, and then was directed to take command in the captured capital. Ord shared the feeling I had expressed in regard to the treatment of the fallen enemy, and learning my views he asked that I might be ordered to accompany him to
difficulties than I did—no man is less responsible for the beginning or continuance of the strife, with all its horrors, than I am—and no man living can more earnestly desire a speedy restoration of peace, harmony, and prosperity, throughout the country than I do. All these things I think I can assert of myself. But of my views and feelings under a very different aspect of affairs from what now exists you are not altogether uninformed. You had them very fully expressed at City Point last February. You reported them very correctly in your telegram from that place to the Secretary of War—upon that telegram the conference at Hampton Roads was granted. When I parted with you on my return from that conference, I assured you, as you may recollect, that while nothing definite had been accomplished, yet I was in hopes that good would come of it. Such was my hope and earnest desire. No one could have been more disappointed, mortified, and chagrined, at the result of his labors, in any und<
prosecution or trial if it should be thought proper for any considerations to adopt such a course toward me. I wish a release from imprisonment on account both of my health and private affairs. I might add that I think I could render some service in restoring harmony to the country; that, however, I leave for others to consider. My case and request are briefly submitted to you. Act in the premises as your sense of duty may direct. Yours most respectfully, Alexander H. Stephens. In December of the same year Mrs. Jefferson Davis applied to Grant by letter, and in May, 1866, she went in person to Washington to ask his influence in procuring a remission of some of the penalties imposed upon her husband, and Grant did use his influence, not indeed to obtain the release of the prisoner, but to mitigate the hardships of his confinement. Mrs. Davis's letter and messages were conveyed through me; the letter was full of respect for the conqueror, acknowledgments of his clemency, and t
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 3
gal adviser of Lee; he came to see me to learn Grant's feeling. I ascertained that Grant was firm l letter opposing Grant's contention. Finally Grant declared that he would resign his commission iay, 1869, soon after the first inauguration of Grant. Lee was in Washington about some business con recently appointed Minister to England. General Grant and Motley both described the interview tohern general. The former enemies shook hands; Grant asked Lee to be seated, and presented Motley. to Mexico. But in a month or two he wrote to Grant, applying to be placed on the same footing witt of the Southern Confederacy, appealed to General Grant in the following letter from Fort Warren i the same year Mrs. Jefferson Davis applied to Grant by letter, and in May, 1866, she went in persoictions which Grant wished to retain. For General Grant believed that the feeling of the South afteven days after the assassination of Lincoln. Grant disapproved of Sherman's terms as absolutely a[24 more...]
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 3
y; that, however, I leave for others to consider. My case and request are briefly submitted to you. Act in the premises as your sense of duty may direct. Yours most respectfully, Alexander H. Stephens. In December of the same year Mrs. Jefferson Davis applied to Grant by letter, and in May, 1866, she went in person to Washington to ask his influence in procuring a remission of some of the penalties imposed upon her husband, and Grant did use his influence, not indeed to obtain the release of the prisoner, but to mitigate the hardships of his confinement. Mrs. Davis's letter and messages were conveyed through me; the letter was full of respect for the conqueror, acknowledgments of his clemency, and touching appeals for further mercy. All know you ever, she said, as good as well as great, merciful as well as brave. Make me, she concluded, your respectful friend. The vindictive feeling of President Johnson continued for months, and only Grant's interposition preserved the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 3
Chapter 3: Grant and the South after the War. the policy initiated at Appomattox was steadily maintained by Grant. He became no more vindictive after the murder of Lincoln, nor did he shrink from the application of his own principles because they were carried further by Sherman than he thought advisable. The new President was anxious to treat traitors harshly; he disliked the paroles that Grant had accorded to Lee and his soldiers, and steps were soon taken with his approval to procurred already or they are heartless and unfeeling and wish to stay at home out of danger while the punishment is being inflicted. Love and kisses for you and the children. Ulys. This letter was written eleven days after the assassination of Lincoln. Grant disapproved of Sherman's terms as absolutely as Stanton or the President; he had just revoked all negotiations for civil conditions, and insisted on the absolute military submission of the enemy; but he was full of pity for the people of
R. E. Lee (search for this): chapter 3
with his approval to procure the indictment of Lee for treason. General Lee at once appealed to GGeneral Lee at once appealed to General Grant. His first communication was verbal, and was made through Mr. Reverdy Johnson, who ac in order to indicate his complete submission. Lee, though entirely willing to make the applicatiocommand in Richmond, made known this feeling of Lee to Grant, through General Ingalls, and Grant didorse Lee's application favorably. Accordingly Lee forwarded two papers of the same date, one an ae issued to discontinue the proceedings against Lee. The great antagonists met only once after tof building railroads, and he said playfully to Lee: You and I, General, have had more to do wit, and no other reference was made to the past. Lee soon arose, and the soldiers parted, not to meeir arms. Scores of Southern officers besides Lee applied to Grant for protection, and literally ston on the same terms that had been allowed to Lee. While he waited for Johnston's reply, Grant wr[8 more...]
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 3
st in the South the next year, even with the war ending now, will be beyond conception. People who talk of further retaliation and punishment, except of the political leaders, either do not conceive of the suffering endured already or they are heartless and unfeeling and wish to stay at home out of danger while the punishment is being inflicted. Love and kisses for you and the children. Ulys. This letter was written eleven days after the assassination of Lincoln. Grant disapproved of Sherman's terms as absolutely as Stanton or the President; he had just revoked all negotiations for civil conditions, and insisted on the absolute military submission of the enemy; but he was full of pity for the people of the South, and had only harsh rebuke for the rancor that would inflict further suffering. He turned from war and its horrors to the spreading oaks of Raleigh for relief, and while waiting the answer to his inexorable summons sent love and kisses to his wife and the children.
Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): chapter 3
ld I attempt to avoid a prosecution or trial if it should be thought proper for any considerations to adopt such a course toward me. I wish a release from imprisonment on account both of my health and private affairs. I might add that I think I could render some service in restoring harmony to the country; that, however, I leave for others to consider. My case and request are briefly submitted to you. Act in the premises as your sense of duty may direct. Yours most respectfully, Alexander H. Stephens. In December of the same year Mrs. Jefferson Davis applied to Grant by letter, and in May, 1866, she went in person to Washington to ask his influence in procuring a remission of some of the penalties imposed upon her husband, and Grant did use his influence, not indeed to obtain the release of the prisoner, but to mitigate the hardships of his confinement. Mrs. Davis's letter and messages were conveyed through me; the letter was full of respect for the conqueror, acknowledgment
September, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 3
refused. General J. Kirby Smith, in command west of the Mississippi, did not surrender with the other armies in rebellion, and even when his forces yielded he fled to Mexico. But in a month or two he wrote to Grant, applying to be placed on the same footing with those who had surrendered earlier. Grant thereupon obtained the assurance of the President that if Smith would return and take the prescribed oath, he should be treated exactly as if he had surrendered and been paroled. In September, 1865, Alexander Stephens, the VicePres-ident of the Southern Confederacy, appealed to General Grant in the following letter from Fort Warren in Boston Harbor, where he was imprisoned, asking for his release on parole or bail. This was soon afterward granted. Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, mass., 16th Sept., 1865. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Washington, D. C,. dear Sir,—The apology for this letter, as well as its explanation, is to be found in the facts herein briefly presented.
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