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ped to be the nominee of the Democrats. He was at this moment acting in unison with them; his only friends were of their party; he was their representative, and though he did many things that many Democrats disapproved, they were forced as a party to uphold him. Thus when Grant was thrust into a position of personal and prominent hostility to Johnson, the Republicans claimed him and rallied around him. He knew himself that the die was cast. He was nominated by acclamation at Cincinnati in May, 1868. Stanton carried him the news. I was with Grant at his own headquarters when the Secretary of War entered the room. I had never seen Stanton there before, but this time he did not send for Grant. He came hurriedly up the stairs panting for breath lest some one should precede him. He had obtained the first information of the vote, even in advance of Grant, and as he rushed in he exclaimed: General! I have come to tell you that you have been nominated by the Republican party for Pre
t history of his life, to be used in the political canvass. He knew my occupation and approved it, so that he was not after all indifferent to success nor to the means to insure it. He simply did not wish to use these means himself in this campaign. He wanted to feel that he had not striven for his own elevation. When my work was complete, he wrote me the following letter: Galena, Ill., August 18, 1868. dear Badeau,—As I have concluded to remain here till about the close of September, I think you had better open the letters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The f
ot otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The family are all well. Yours truly, U. S. Grant. Accordingly, I opened the hundreds of letters that had been received since his departure, answered those that required answers, and took a dozen or more with me to Galena. There I remained until the election, for Grant did not return to Washington before November. In all this period only one or two of the political people of consequence ventured to write to him, but many letters were addressed to me the contents of which were evidently intended for my chief. Of course, I laid all these before him, and my answers were governed by his wishes; but he still refused to advise, much more to dictate any of the strategy of the campaign. E. B. Washburne and Russell Jones were the only politicians of note who saw him often during the canvass; but they wer
be the nominee of the Democrats. He was at this moment acting in unison with them; his only friends were of their party; he was their representative, and though he did many things that many Democrats disapproved, they were forced as a party to uphold him. Thus when Grant was thrust into a position of personal and prominent hostility to Johnson, the Republicans claimed him and rallied around him. He knew himself that the die was cast. He was nominated by acclamation at Cincinnati in May, 1868. Stanton carried him the news. I was with Grant at his own headquarters when the Secretary of War entered the room. I had never seen Stanton there before, but this time he did not send for Grant. He came hurriedly up the stairs panting for breath lest some one should precede him. He had obtained the first information of the vote, even in advance of Grant, and as he rushed in he exclaimed: General! I have come to tell you that you have been nominated by the Republican party for President
August 18th, 1868 AD (search for this): chapter 17
e heard him declare. When he went to Galena I remained in Washington writing a pamphlet history of his life, to be used in the political canvass. He knew my occupation and approved it, so that he was not after all indifferent to success nor to the means to insure it. He simply did not wish to use these means himself in this campaign. He wanted to feel that he had not striven for his own elevation. When my work was complete, he wrote me the following letter: Galena, Ill., August 18, 1868. dear Badeau,—As I have concluded to remain here till about the close of September, I think you had better open the letters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then
Adam Badeau (search for this): chapter 17
When he went to Galena I remained in Washington writing a pamphlet history of his life, to be used in the political canvass. He knew my occupation and approved it, so that he was not after all indifferent to success nor to the means to insure it. He simply did not wish to use these means himself in this campaign. He wanted to feel that he had not striven for his own elevation. When my work was complete, he wrote me the following letter: Galena, Ill., August 18, 1868. dear Badeau,—As I have concluded to remain here till about the close of September, I think you had better open the letters that have accumulated in Washington. Such as are on official subjects refer to Rawlins. All others do with as your judgment dictates, only do not send any to me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I
Frank Blair (search for this): chapter 17
pure and simple. Two instances of Grant's persistent determination not to become a partisan I can now recall. General Frank Blair was the Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency, and in his speeches made repeated and offensive reference tool of the politicians, etc., etc., etc.; but Grant refused to resent the language. He had been a warm personal friend of Blair and excused the heat of his expressions in a political campaign, though there were many military and political associates of each who thought these expressions unpardonable; for Blair had received advancement and recognition from Grant, and was thoroughly conscious of the purity of Grant's intentions. All this made no difference in their personal relations; and when Grant first met Blair after the canvass was over, he received him as cordially as ever. The other circumstance relates to Sherman. Many of Grant's friends thought that an expression of sympathy from Sherman, the utterance of a wish for Grant's s
mportant to the Republican party as the party was to him. He had not wanted the nomination and the party had wanted the prestige of his name at the polls. He was not now grateful to the party, for he believed that if the party leaders could have done without him they never would have nominated him. And it is true that he was not the choice of the leaders, who doubted his political ability and distrusted even yet his political fidelity; he was forced upon them by the rank and file. Stanton, Chase, Greeley, Sumner—all would have preferred a purely political man. Grant knew this. He refused from the first to take any active part in the campaign. When the trial of the President was concluded and Congress adjourned, he set out for his little home in Galena to get away from arrangements and conferences. The party managers were very much annoyed by this course. Nearly all his friends thought it unwise, and those who were intimate enough advised against it. He was now, they said, the
me except such as you think absolutely require my attention and will not keep till my return. If you are not otherwise more agreeably engaged, I think you will find it pleasant here for a while and then to return with me. I have also written to Comstock to come out if he feels like it. The family are all well. Yours truly, U. S. Grant. Accordingly, I opened the hundreds of letters that had been received since his departure, answered those that required answers, and took a dozen or more constant communication with the political managers. He was without orders or express sanction from Grant for this course, but Grant knew that Rawlins was acting in his interest, just as he knew that I had written his history for the campaign. Comstock, one of the aides-de-camp, was also at Galena, but he abstained scrupulously from politics. He prided himself on being a soldier, pure and simple. Two instances of Grant's persistent determination not to become a partisan I can now recall.
Stanton Grant (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 17: Grant as a Presidential candidate. I have already shown Grant's original aversiGrant's original aversion to politics. Immediately after the close of the war, the attention of the country was turned toinvent a bait that must tempt him to talk; but Grant would simply look at them with no expression wk their leave. Sometimes, as the door closed, Grant would look up at me with a quizzical expressio there could be no mistaking the signs. Still Grant lived in the hope that the necessity might be successor. The struggles whose inner history Grant knew so well, the troubles with Cabinet Ministere forced as a party to uphold him. Thus when Grant was thrust into a position of personal and prost information of the vote, even in advance of Grant, and as he rushed in he exclaimed: General! Ithe record before you. With all his modesty Grant was conscious of his own character. He felt tuld not be forwarded to him, nor even opened. Grant, indeed, at this time, meant to keep himself u[6 more...]
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