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City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
cause, requested to be relieved. This was not the only instance of magnanimity in Logan's career. In December, 1864, when Grant became impatient at what he thought the needless delay of Thomas at Nashville, Logan was directed to take command of the Army of the Cumberland, and started to obey the order. This was the greatest promotion he had yet received and offered that opportunity for separate distinction which every soldier covets; but when he arrived at Louisville, on his way from City Point, he received the news of Thomas's great victory, and instantly telegraphed to Grant, proposing that he should now himself return to his subordinate command. Such greatness of soul always recommended itself to Grant. But Logan was also capable of intense bitterness, and on one or two occasions his course was very different from what Grant could either indorse or admire. In General Sherman's Memoirs he described Logan and Blair as political generals, and assigned that as the reason why
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
truggle. The future General-in-Chief was commanding a regiment which had yet not marched to the front, when he was approached by important people who wished him to allow Logan and McClernand to address his troops. As both these orators had been prominent Democrats, Grant hesitated at first to give the permission; but he found Logan's speech full of fiery patriotism, and Logan's action at this crisis, Grant often declared, had prodigious influence with the people of the southern portion of Illinois. His personal popularity undoubtedly contributed to keep Egypt, as the region is called, loyal to the Union. The occasion of Logan's speech was the first meeting between these two men, destined afterward to be so closely associated in politics as well as war. When I first went to Grant the praises of Logan were constantly on his lips. I had never met the great volunteer general at the time, and Grant never tired of telling me his history. So, too, when I wrote a volume on Grant's ear
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
first meeting between these two men, destined afterward to be so closely associated in politics as well as war. When I first went to Grant the praises of Logan were constantly on his lips. I had never met the great volunteer general at the time, and Grant never tired of telling me his history. So, too, when I wrote a volume on Grant's early campaigns, I got all my information in regard to Logan, firsthand from Grant. He traced for me Logan's entire career, by his own side at Belmont, Donelson, Corinth, and in the Vicksburg campaign; and always said that Logan and Crocker were the two best generals from civil life that the war produced. On the death of McPherson, Sherman nominated Howard, the junior of Logan, to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, which Logan was holding temporarily. Grant did not agree with Sherman's estimate of the relative ability of Logan and Howard, but he refused to interfere with Sherman's choice. Logan was bitterly disappointed, yet he remained
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
ree with Sherman's estimate of the relative ability of Logan and Howard, but he refused to interfere with Sherman's choice. Logan was bitterly disappointed, yet he remained and served with unflinching zeal under the man who had been his junior, though Hooker at the same time, and for the same cause, requested to be relieved. This was not the only instance of magnanimity in Logan's career. In December, 1864, when Grant became impatient at what he thought the needless delay of Thomas at Nashville, Logan was directed to take command of the Army of the Cumberland, and started to obey the order. This was the greatest promotion he had yet received and offered that opportunity for separate distinction which every soldier covets; but when he arrived at Louisville, on his way from City Point, he received the news of Thomas's great victory, and instantly telegraphed to Grant, proposing that he should now himself return to his subordinate command. Such greatness of soul always recommended
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
same time, and for the same cause, requested to be relieved. This was not the only instance of magnanimity in Logan's career. In December, 1864, when Grant became impatient at what he thought the needless delay of Thomas at Nashville, Logan was directed to take command of the Army of the Cumberland, and started to obey the order. This was the greatest promotion he had yet received and offered that opportunity for separate distinction which every soldier covets; but when he arrived at Louisville, on his way from City Point, he received the news of Thomas's great victory, and instantly telegraphed to Grant, proposing that he should now himself return to his subordinate command. Such greatness of soul always recommended itself to Grant. But Logan was also capable of intense bitterness, and on one or two occasions his course was very different from what Grant could either indorse or admire. In General Sherman's Memoirs he described Logan and Blair as political generals, and assi
ted in politics as well as war. When I first went to Grant the praises of Logan were constantly on his lips. I had never met the great volunteer general at the time, and Grant never tired of telling me his history. So, too, when I wrote a volume on Grant's early campaigns, I got all my information in regard to Logan, firsthand from Grant. He traced for me Logan's entire career, by his own side at Belmont, Donelson, Corinth, and in the Vicksburg campaign; and always said that Logan and Crocker were the two best generals from civil life that the war produced. On the death of McPherson, Sherman nominated Howard, the junior of Logan, to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, which Logan was holding temporarily. Grant did not agree with Sherman's estimate of the relative ability of Logan and Howard, but he refused to interfere with Sherman's choice. Logan was bitterly disappointed, yet he remained and served with unflinching zeal under the man who had been his junior, though
Frank Blair (search for this): chapter 42
vets; but when he arrived at Louisville, on his way from City Point, he received the news of Thomas's great victory, and instantly telegraphed to Grant, proposing that he should now himself return to his subordinate command. Such greatness of soul always recommended itself to Grant. But Logan was also capable of intense bitterness, and on one or two occasions his course was very different from what Grant could either indorse or admire. In General Sherman's Memoirs he described Logan and Blair as political generals, and assigned that as the reason why he had nominated neither to command the Army of the Tennessee. His language was unfortunate and gave great offense to both those officers. I have no doubt that Sherman himself afterward regretted its use; but once uttered, the mischief could not be undone. Logan was as firm in his enmities as his friendships, and he never forgave Sherman this slur upon his military reputation. In the course of time he became a member of the Senat
John A. Logan (search for this): chapter 42
Chapter 42: Grant and Logan. the relations of Grant and Logan began almost with the war. GrLogan began almost with the war. Grant tells in his Memoirs of his anxiety about Logan's position in the early days of the great struged by important people who wished him to allow Logan and McClernand to address his troops. As both at first to give the permission; but he found Logan's speech full of fiery patriotism, and Logan'sght the needless delay of Thomas at Nashville, Logan was directed to take command of the Army of thre. In General Sherman's Memoirs he described Logan and Blair as political generals, and assigned ce uttered, the mischief could not be undone. Logan was as firm in his enmities as his friendshipscious, he was still more earnest in condemning Logan's course. So, too, Logan was unrelenting ine thought the proper course, and after a while Logan's asperity, at least towards Grant, was soften and calumny came. Grant would have preferred Logan to succeed Hayes, to any other man; and in the[26 more...]
ntly on his lips. I had never met the great volunteer general at the time, and Grant never tired of telling me his history. So, too, when I wrote a volume on Grant's early campaigns, I got all my information in regard to Logan, firsthand from Grant. He traced for me Logan's entire career, by his own side at Belmont, Donelson, Corinth, and in the Vicksburg campaign; and always said that Logan and Crocker were the two best generals from civil life that the war produced. On the death of McPherson, Sherman nominated Howard, the junior of Logan, to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, which Logan was holding temporarily. Grant did not agree with Sherman's estimate of the relative ability of Logan and Howard, but he refused to interfere with Sherman's choice. Logan was bitterly disappointed, yet he remained and served with unflinching zeal under the man who had been his junior, though Hooker at the same time, and for the same cause, requested to be relieved. This was not the
r were the two best generals from civil life that the war produced. On the death of McPherson, Sherman nominated Howard, the junior of Logan, to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, which Logan was holding temporarily. Grant did not agree with Sherman's estimate of the relative ability of Logan and Howard, but he refused to interfere with Sherman's choice. Logan was bitterly disappointed, yet he remained and served with unflinching zeal under the man who had been his junior, though Hooker at the same time, and for the same cause, requested to be relieved. This was not the only instance of magnanimity in Logan's career. In December, 1864, when Grant became impatient at what he thought the needless delay of Thomas at Nashville, Logan was directed to take command of the Army of the Cumberland, and started to obey the order. This was the greatest promotion he had yet received and offered that opportunity for separate distinction which every soldier covets; but when he arrive
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