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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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De Soto, Jefferson County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nish occupation of Alabama battles fought by De Soto settlement at Mobile French and Spanish wartiz during captivity was of invaluable use to De Soto. On July 2, 1540, the army passed from Geoear where the city of Rome, Ga., now stands. De Soto was received kindly by the Indian chieftain,uelled by the courage and presence of mind of De Soto, and the wrath of the natives appeased. The ed with provisions and slaves. On July 26th, De Soto approached the town of Coosa. The chieftain was held as a prisoner and hostage to enable De Soto to extort ransom and to prevent any hostility on the part of the Indian warriors. De Soto then turned southward to Maubila, the principal city was the beginning of a most terrible battle; De Soto succeeded in getting outside of the gates, an Indians and negroes. The original plan of De Soto was to rejoin his ships in Pensacola bay, bute story of these five months of bloodshed by De Soto furnishes the first authentic account of warf[1 more...]
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Introductory the First Spanish occupation of Alabama battles fought by De Soto settlement at Mobthe first white men who ever trod the soil of Alabama. In May, 1539, Hernando de Soto, with 1,000 months in passing through what is now the State of Alabama. They were met on the eastern border wit; and the early occupancy by the French of South Alabama was constantly disturbed by conflicts withh finally, in 1765, established themselves in Alabama, an agreement being made by which the territo 1787 marched from the Cumberland region into Alabama against the depredating Indians. They were swed by many other atrocities on the people of Alabama, and under orders from the general government effectually ended the Indian disturbances in Alabama, the savages gladly entering into a treaty ofMarch 1817, the present territorial limits of Alabama were defined by Congress, and on December 14, William R. King were among the officers from Alabama who were killed in battle during the Mexican [9 more...]
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 1
exception of the expedition under the ill-starred Lord Raleigh, the first attempt to plant an English colony in America was that at Jamestown in 1607. So the Saxon or English-speaking people were nearly a century behind the Latin race in their attempt to assert jurisdiction over, take possession of and occupy territory upon the new continent. But, with the exception of Napoleon's momentary control in Louisiana, the rule of France in this country was effectually terminated by the treaty of Paris on February 7, 1763; and the Spanish crown, which once exercised dominion over all explored parts of America, and claimed the right to all by virtue of discovery, is now left without sovereignty in the Western hemisphere. In April, 1528, Pamfilo de Narvaez landed with 300 men on the shore of Tampa bay. He marched northward, believing that in the interior he would find a wealthy empire similar to those of Mexico and Peru. The greater number of this expedition perished, but Alvar Nuflez a
Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
were beaten off with the loss of 200 men and one of the ships. The British ships also made an attack on Mobile, but retired without doing any material damage. General Jackson then marched with 4,000 men to Pensacola, drove the British from Fort Barrancas, and then proceeded to New Orleans, where, on January 8th, he won his great victory over the British General Pakenham. A month later a fleet of 38 British war vessels and 5,000 soldiers captured Fort Bowyer, but as peace had been declared, tth physically and intellectually. Though quite young while in Mexico, he was appointed military governor of Orizaba After the Mexican war he engaged in journalism. In 1861 he successfully performed the delicate duty of taking possession of Forts Barrancas and McRee at Pensacola. In April, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the Third Alabama infantry; was highly esteemed as a soldier; was promoted to a brigadier-gen- eralship, but before receiving his commission was killed while gallantly lead
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ckson was placed in command of the Southern army and proceeded to Mobile to protect the Gulf coast, which was now menaced by the British fleet. He strengthened Fort Bowyer, situated on a tongue of land about thirty miles from Mobile, defending it with 20 guns and 160 men under Major Lawrence. This fort was on the present site of Fort Morgan. On September 12th the fort was attacked by a party of 712 British and Indians under Colonel Nichols, assisted by two sloops and two brigs. They were beaten off with the loss of 200 men and one of the ships. The British ships also made an attack on Mobile, but retired without doing any material damage. General Ja where, on January 8th, he won his great victory over the British General Pakenham. A month later a fleet of 38 British war vessels and 5,000 soldiers captured Fort Bowyer, but as peace had been declared, they only held it a few weeks. The withdrawal of the British troops enabled the government to make very satisfactory treaties
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ille, having succeeded in making treaties with the Indians, sailed up the Alabama river, passed the present location of Montgomery and established Fort Toulouse, at the site of the present town of Wetumpka. Later, a settlement was made at MontgomeryFort Toulouse, at the site of the present town of Wetumpka. Later, a settlement was made at Montgomery, and Fort Tombecbee was established at what is now called Jones' Bluff. Fort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killedMontgomery, and Fort Tombecbee was established at what is now called Jones' Bluff. Fort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killed their commander and deserted the garrison. In 1719, France was at war with Spain, and on May 4th Lord Bienville attacked Pensacola, captured the garrison and sent the captives to Havana. Later, during the summer, Matamora, the Spanish governor oFort Toulouse contained four bastions, mounted with eight cannon, and was garrisoned by the French till 1763, except for a short period in 1722 when the troops mutinied, killed their commander and deserted the garrison. In 1719, France was at war with Spain, and on May 4th Lord Bienville attacked Pensacola, captured the garrison and sent the captives to Havana. Later, during the summer, Matamora, the Spanish governor of Cuba, retook Pensacola. The Spaniards landed on Dauphin island and bombarded Fort Filippe, but were repulsed by Sevigny, whose command consisted of 260 soldiers and 200 Indians. The French fleet arrived, Pensacola was again retaken by the French
Marengo (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
1813, 273 years afterward, the Creek warrior, Weatherford, with 1000 savage followers, attacked, and during a five hours conflict slaughtered 531 men, women and children, including white soldiers, friendly Indians and negroes. The original plan of De Soto was to rejoin his ships in Pensacola bay, but fearing that many of his followers would refuse to remain with him for further exploration he turned toward the northwest, passing through the country that now forms the counties of Clarke, Marengo, Greene and Pickens. During the journey he had many conflicts with the Indians, encountering a large force on the Black Warrior with which he had a very serious engagement. He then turned into the Indian village of Chickasaw, near the site of the modern city of Columbus, Miss. De Soto and his followers had occupied five months in passing through what is now the State of Alabama. They were met on the eastern border with the most hospitable and kindly treatment, which they returned with tr
Courtland, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
eld themselves ready to assist their brethren in neighboring States. Several companies of Alabamians volunteered and fought in the Seminole and Florida wars and a still greater number gave their services to assist in Texan independence. Many of these perished, a considerable number being victims of the Goliad massacre, where 330 persons were murdered in the most atrocious manner. Milton Irish and Bennet Butler, from Huntsville, were among the few who escaped, and Captain Shackleford, of Courtland, was spared because he was a physician and the Mexicans needed his services to attend their wounded. When war was declared against Mexico, thousands upon thousands of patriotic citizens of this State tendered their services to the government, but only one regiment composed entirely of Alabamians could be accepted. It was organized at Mobile in June, 1846, and designated as the First Alabama volunteers. Its officers were as follows: Col. John R. Coffee, Lieut.-Col. Richard G. Earle, Maj
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1
e and Florida wars Alabamians in the war with Mexico. It was Easter Sunday, March 27, 1513. The of Spain in all of South and Central America, Mexico, and much of what is now the southern portion and finally reached the Spanish settlement of Mexico. These were the first white men who ever trodter the death of Montezuma and the conquest of Mexico by Cortez, the Muscogees, a powerful tribe of their wounded. When war was declared against Mexico, thousands upon thousands of patriotic citizen and J. D. Shelley. The regiment proceeded to Mexico, first served under General Pillow and afterwae, also volunteered and served in the war with Mexico. Of these the only cavalry company was that oantry. Many of the Alabamians who served in Mexico became quite distinguished in civil life and iattle at Kingston, Ga. After returning from Mexico, Colonel Coffee lived for fifty years a respecd intellectually. Though quite young while in Mexico, he was appointed military governor of Orizaba[1 more...]
Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
and often surrounded by hostile tribes of Indians. In one of his earliest conflicts with natives he rescued Jean Ortiz, one of the Spanish followers of Narvaez, who for eleven years had been held as a prisoner by the Indians. The knowledge of the Indian customs and language acquired by Ortiz during captivity was of invaluable use to De Soto. On July 2, 1540, the army passed from Georgia into Alabama at the site of the Indian village of Costa, which was situated near where the city of Rome, Ga., now stands. De Soto was received kindly by the Indian chieftain, but depredations committed by some of the soldiers precipitated a conflict, which, however, was quelled by the courage and presence of mind of De Soto, and the wrath of the natives appeased. The wily Spaniard then enticed the chief within his lines and held him as hostage until he was ransomed with provisions and slaves. On July 26th, De Soto approached the town of Coosa. The chieftain with 1,000 tall, sprightly and act
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