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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

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dson, assisted by General Gholson, of the Mississippi militia, to tear up the road between La Grange and Corinth, while he made a demonstration between Memphis and La Grange. His force comprised Colonel Slemon's brigade, the Thirty-third cavalry, and George's Fifth cavalry; and Colonel McCulloch's brigade, the First Partisan Rangers, Eighteenth battalion and Second Missouri. Major Mitchell, with two companies of the Eighteenth, drove in the enemy's pickets at Quinn's mill on the night of the 1st, and Chalmers crossed there on the 3d, capturing the picket of 27 men. He then attacked the Federal force at Collierville, but found it heavily reinforced, so that the gallant charge made by his men was of no avail. Colonel George, leading the attack of Slemons' brigade and riding into town, was captured. The chief surgeon, Dr. W. H. Beatty, was also taken, and 24 others, and 69 were killed or wounded. Meanwhile a small force, under Col. J. J. Neely, destroyed the railroad near Middleton.
in the main army until after Second Manassas. The Twenty-first Mississippi belonged to Barksdale's brigade of this division. This whole command was distinguished throughout the Maryland campaign, and in the following December at Fredericksburg gained immortal renown by its repeated repulses of a whole Federal corps in the attempt to cross the Rappahannock before Lee was ready to receive them. Again, at Chancellorsville, Humphreys displayed his fitness for the command of brave men. On the first day at Gettysburg the gallant Barksdale fell mortally wounded, and Humphreys succeeded to the command of the now famous brigade, consisting of the Thirteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Twenty-first regiments of Mississippi infantry. From September, 1863, until the following spring, the brigade served under Longstreet in Georgia and in Tennessee, paralleling at Chickamauga and Knoxville its heroic deeds in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Through all the unequaled hardships and danger
McCulloch's brigade, the First Partisan Rangers, Eighteenth battalion and Second Missouri. Major Mitchell, with two companies of the Eighteenth, drove in the enemy's pickets at Quinn's mill on the night of the 1st, and Chalmers crossed there on the 3d, capturing the picket of 27 men. He then attacked the Federal force at Collierville, but found it heavily reinforced, so that the gallant charge made by his men was of no avail. Colonel George, leading the attack of Slemons' brigade and riding ine of his aides, Lieut. H. B. Estes and Captain Lowrey, who had their horses killed, and Capt. W. B. Magruder, Lieut. T. C. Holliday and Cadet James D. Reid. The Forty-second captured 150 prisoners, and other regiments did equally well. On the third day of the battle General Davis commanded the division, which participated in the charge on Cemetery Hill. While waiting in line of battle immediately in the rear of the Confederate batteries, Davis' brigade lost 2 men killed and 21 wounded. Abo
s to advance on the ridge road and form line of battle in front of the enemy, to be reinforced by a brigade or division from the Second corps; Bragg's corps was to assemble at Monterey, advance up the two intersecting roads and then follow Hardee, forming a second line of battle. The First corps, except the division detached at Bethel, would follow the Third corps. The Reserve corps and the forces at Bethel and Purdy would concentrate on Monterey and go into action as practicable. On the 4th Hardee marched to Mickey's, and it was the skirmish on his front which led Grant to say that he had scarcely the faintest idea of a general attack. That night it rained in torrents. But as soon as possible Hardee advanced, and at 10 o'clock was in line of battle, though it was not until 4 o'clock in the afternoon that the remainder of the army, delayed by the mud, was able to get in position. Consequently the battle had to be delayed until Sunday, the 6th, which fortunately was a clear an
e Forty-third, and McLain, of the Thirty-seventh, Lieutenant-Colonels Terral, of the Seventh battalion, and Campbell, of the Fortieth, and Majors Keirn, of the Thirty-eighth, and Yates, of the Thirty-sixth. At four o'clock on the morning of the 4th, the Confederate batteries were in position and opened fire upon the town, and an attack was ordered at daylight; but there was a delay until nine o'clock, ascribed to the illness of General Hebert. Price's command swept forward, notwithstanding forces were exhausted. Many of the regiments were without either ammunition or rations. It was evident that the attack had failed, and preparations were at once made for retreat. Lovell's division, which had not attacked on the morning of the 4th, formed to protect the retreat, which was not molested during the afternoon by Rosecrans, whose force was evidently also in no shape to immediately renew the fight. The retreat was continued on the 5th to Davis' bridge on the Hatchie, but the bri
bridge was found in the hands of Hurlbut. Moore's brigade, now but 300 men, was thrown across, but the enemy was strongly posted and Moore, reinforced by Phifer, was swept back over the bridge, losing four guns. All that Maury's division, reinforced by Villepigue, could do, was to check the enemy's advance until Van Dorn could find another crossing place. If Rosecrans had promptly followed Van Dorn, as ordered by Grant, the Confederate army could hardly have escaped. He did set out on the 5th, with McPherson's fresh brigade in advance, but before he could bring up strength enough to overcome the strong resistance of Bowen's brigade, guarding the rear, Van Dorn was safely crossing the Hatchie at a bridge six miles south of Davis', and Bowen crossed the Tuscumbia, burning the bridge behind him and saving all the trains. In this very important contest on the Tuscumbia, Carruthers' battalion and the Fifteenth Mississippi and some companies of Jackson's cavalry carried off the hono
b infantry, cavalry and gunboats at Liverpool, defeating the infantry and gunboats combined. Under cover of this diversion, Sherman's two corps of infantry rapidly crossed the Big Black and advanced to Clinton. Here the brigades of Adams and Starke engaged in a heavy skirmish February 4th, and then hung on the front of the advancing columns during the following day, steadily fighting though fully aware of the overwhelming strength of the enemy. Marching through Jackson on the night of the 5th, General Lee turned to the north to cover Loring's division while it could cross Pearl river to Brandon, and was joined by Ferguson's brigade. Early on the 8th, finding that Sherman was crossing Pearl river toward Meridian, Lee sent Ferguson to Morton to cover Loring's front, called Ross up from Yazoo and ordered Jackson with Adams' and Starke's brigades to harass the flank of the enemy. General Polk became convinced that Sherman's object was Mobile, not Meridian, and ordered Lee on the 9
action as practicable. On the 4th Hardee marched to Mickey's, and it was the skirmish on his front which led Grant to say that he had scarcely the faintest idea of a general attack. That night it rained in torrents. But as soon as possible Hardee advanced, and at 10 o'clock was in line of battle, though it was not until 4 o'clock in the afternoon that the remainder of the army, delayed by the mud, was able to get in position. Consequently the battle had to be delayed until Sunday, the 6th, which fortunately was a clear and bracing day. At daylight the order was given to advance. An attack upon the skirmishers in front, commanded by Major Hardcastle had been handsomely resisted by that promising young officer, and in half an hour the battle was fierce. The Sixth Mississippi, under Colonel Thornton, charged with Cleburne in the face of a storm of fire and drove Prentiss from his tents, but rushing on through the camp met with a bloody repulse. Then, rallying again and again
ensated to some extent by capturing 387 men, mainly from Green and Tracy. Bowen held his position on Bayou Pierre during the next day, but was not reinforced. Generals Loring and Tilghman arrived the following night, and it being decided that the position could not be held, Grand Gulf was ordered abandoned and Bowen's forces withdrew across the Big Black river at Harkinson's ferry. McPherson's corps followed, and was stoutly resisted en route, but on May 3d encamped at the ferry. On the 6th Sherman landed at Bruinsburg and increased the Federal army to about 33,000 men. With this strength, hearing Banks could not reach Port Hudson immediately, Grant abandoned his plan of holding Grand Gulf as a base and operating southward first against Port Hudson, and determined to cut loose from his base of supplies and with his whole force, subsisting from the country, attack Vicksburg from the rear. This meant much to the planters in that part of Mississippi. Grant supplied his army with
ia was advancing into Pennsylvania; Bragg's army was facing Rosecrans before Chattanooga, and General Gardner was besieged at Port Hudson. The only relief obtained from the Trans-Mississippi forces was an expedition under Maj.-Gen. J. G. Walker against Young's Point and Milliken's Bend in June, which destroyed all the sources of Federal supplies in that quarter. Harrison captured Richmond and defeated the enemy's cavalry June 6th; but H. E. McCulloch was repulsed from Milliken's Bend on the 7th. Johnston continued to promise some relief, to save the garrison at least, and there was talk of cutting out, supported by an attack by Johnston. It was promised that General Taylor, with 8,000 men, would open communication from the west bank of the river; but nothing came of it. Grant's statement of his condition on June 14th was this: I had now about 71,000 men. More than half were disposed of across the peninsula, between the Yazoo at Haynes' Bluff, and the Big Black, with the divisio
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