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dson, assisted by General Gholson, of the Mississippi militia, to tear up the road between La Grange and Corinth, while he made a demonstration between Memphis and La Grange. His force comprised Colonel Slemon's brigade, the Thirty-third cavalry, and George's Fifth cavalry; and Colonel McCulloch's brigade, the First Partisan Rangers, Eighteenth battalion and Second Missouri. Major Mitchell, with two companies of the Eighteenth, drove in the enemy's pickets at Quinn's mill on the night of the 1st, and Chalmers crossed there on the 3d, capturing the picket of 27 men. He then attacked the Federal force at Collierville, but found it heavily reinforced, so that the gallant charge made by his men was of no avail. Colonel George, leading the attack of Slemons' brigade and riding into town, was captured. The chief surgeon, Dr. W. H. Beatty, was also taken, and 24 others, and 69 were killed or wounded. Meanwhile a small force, under Col. J. J. Neely, destroyed the railroad near Middleton.
McCulloch's brigade, the First Partisan Rangers, Eighteenth battalion and Second Missouri. Major Mitchell, with two companies of the Eighteenth, drove in the enemy's pickets at Quinn's mill on the night of the 1st, and Chalmers crossed there on the 3d, capturing the picket of 27 men. He then attacked the Federal force at Collierville, but found it heavily reinforced, so that the gallant charge made by his men was of no avail. Colonel George, leading the attack of Slemons' brigade and riding ine of his aides, Lieut. H. B. Estes and Captain Lowrey, who had their horses killed, and Capt. W. B. Magruder, Lieut. T. C. Holliday and Cadet James D. Reid. The Forty-second captured 150 prisoners, and other regiments did equally well. On the third day of the battle General Davis commanded the division, which participated in the charge on Cemetery Hill. While waiting in line of battle immediately in the rear of the Confederate batteries, Davis' brigade lost 2 men killed and 21 wounded. Abo
. Johnston expected an immediate assault and posted his forces on the intrenched line: Loring on the right, then Walker, French and Breckinridge to the left, while the cavalry under Jackson observed the fords of Pearl river above and below the town. Sherman, instead of attacking at once, began intrenching and constructing batteries, finding hills from which he could throw a cross fire of shot and shell into all parts of the town. There was spirited skirmishing with light cannonading on the 11th, and Johnston telegraphed President Davis that if the position and works were not bad, want of stores would make it impossible to stand a siege. If the enemy will not attack, we must, or at the last moment withdraw. We cannot attack seriously without risking the army. On the 12th there was a heavy cannonade from the Federal batteries, and a feeble assault was made on Breckinridge's line, which was vigorously repulsed, the Federals losing about 500 men, including 200 captured, and the col
nce, began intrenching and constructing batteries, finding hills from which he could throw a cross fire of shot and shell into all parts of the town. There was spirited skirmishing with light cannonading on the 11th, and Johnston telegraphed President Davis that if the position and works were not bad, want of stores would make it impossible to stand a siege. If the enemy will not attack, we must, or at the last moment withdraw. We cannot attack seriously without risking the army. On the 12th there was a heavy cannonade from the Federal batteries, and a feeble assault was made on Breckinridge's line, which was vigorously repulsed, the Federals losing about 500 men, including 200 captured, and the colors of three Illinois regiments. The bombardment was kept up during the following days, the Federals meanwhile extending their lines to Pearl river north and south of the town, and destroying the railroad. On the night of the 16th Johnston withdrew his army toward Meridian, where he
erman had just entered with his staff and a battalion, increasing the garrison, previously composed of 240 men of the Sixty-sixth Indiana, to 480. Sherman took command and refused Chalmers' demand for surrender. A four hours fight followed, in which Chalmers took and burned the cavalry camp, but, on account of the strength of the works, was unable to capture the enemy. Retiring toward Byhalia Colonel Richardson had a brisk fight next day, and the command fell back to Ingram's Mill. On the 13th Chalmers fought a battle at Wyatt, in which the loss was considerable on both sides. The expedition of General Lee's which Chalmers covered was made along the Memphis & Charleston railroad in Alabama, with orders from General Johnston to cut the railroad between Chattanooga and Nashville; but the cooperation of General Wheeler, which was desired, was delayed on account of the exhaustion of his command consequent upon the famous McMinnville raid. On October 14th, General McPherson, comman
risoners. He immediately set to work destroying the town and ravaging the surrounding country, in order to make the place untenable by Confederate forces. On the 18th he reported to Grant: We have made fine progress to-day in the work of destruction. Jackson will no longer be a point of danger. The land is devastated for thirtr Henry from Tennessee. Chalmers, who had been bombarding the Federal steamers as they passed Dale's Point, promptly attacked Henry's command near Hernando on the 18th, and routed it, capturing Henry and 87 others and killing and wounding a large number. Though compelled to fall back then, south of Panola, the Federal retreat wadriving the enemy to his works and sustaining the severest loss of the division. The Mississippians under Colonel Lowrey were particularly distinguished. On the 18th, Walthall's Mississippians after a sharp fight took Alexander's bridge on the Chickamauga, the Twenty-ninth making the attack in front and losing heavily. The Thi
inguished. On the 18th, Walthall's Mississippians after a sharp fight took Alexander's bridge on the Chickamauga, the Twenty-ninth making the attack in front and losing heavily. The Thirty-fourth also suffered no little. On the morning of the 19th, part of Walker's division having been handled roughly in an assault on Thomas' line, Walthall went in with a shout, breaking the first and second line of the enemy, passing over two full batteries and capturing 411 prisoners. But one gun could be They had orders to go forward, so they stood and returned the fire till their ammunition was exhausted. The regiment lost 25 killed and 141 wounded. In Jackson's brigade the Fifth Mississippi regiment lost its commander, Colonel Sykes, on the 19th, Maj. John B. Herring then taking command. The regiment went into the fight with 225 muskets, and lost 4 killed and 46 wounded on Saturday, and 25 wounded Sunday, and captured 30 prisoners and 200 rifles. The Eighth regiment on Saturday brough
the 20th. The loss was 558, of whom 80 were killed, 454 wounded and 24 missing. Among the killed was Maj. John C. Thompson, of the Forty-fourth, a noble patriot, who had commanded his regiment with gallantry at Murfreesboro. On the night of the 20th, Col. J. H. Sharp took command of the brigade, General Anderson having been called to command Hindman's division. Humphreys' brigade took part in the assault upon Thomas' right, and captured during the day over 400 prisoners, five stand of colorswounded. Col. M. P. Lowrey and Major Hawkins again took prominent part in the fighting of the 20th, on the right of the enemy. The brave Hawkins and Maj. F. C. Karr, of the Thirty-second, were among the mortally wounded. On the morning of the 20th, Lowrey's command having gained the crest of a ridge near the enemy lost one-fourth of its members in a very short time. Nineteen men were buried in one grave where the colors stood, all killed near that spot. They had orders to go forward, so
g to Sherman's account he captured the heavy guns and 400 prisoners. He immediately set to work destroying the town and ravaging the surrounding country, in order to make the place untenable by Confederate forces. On the 18th he reported to Grant: We have made fine progress to-day in the work of destruction. Jackson will no longer be a point of danger. The land is devastated for thirty miles around. After sending an expedition against Canton, the troops started back to Vicksburg. On the 21st Sherman sent word to Grant that he had promised 200 barrels of flour and 20,000 pounds of pork, or equivalents, to the inhabitants, as there were about 800 women and children who would perish unless they received some relief. Grant promptly honored the requisition. On July 13th a Federal expedition under General Herron arrived at Yazoo City in transports, accompanied by a gunboat flotilla. Commander Isaac N. Brown was there, with the few boats that he had improvised, and a small garrison
hom 80 were killed, 454 wounded and 24 missing. Among the killed was Maj. John C. Thompson, of the Forty-fourth, a noble patriot, who had commanded his regiment with gallantry at Murfreesboro. On the night of the 20th, Col. J. H. Sharp took command of the brigade, General Anderson having been called to command Hindman's division. Humphreys' brigade took part in the assault upon Thomas' right, and captured during the day over 400 prisoners, five stand of colors, and 1,200 small arms. On the 22d a detachment of thirty men from the Eighteenth captured 9 officers and 120 men on the mountain near Rossville. Walthall's brigade on Sunday moved first toward the left and came under a severe fire, in which Colonel Reynolds was killed and Major Johnson was wounded. Toward evening the brigade was sent to the extreme right of the Confederate line, and advanced with skirmishing across the Chattanooga road, between Thomas and that city. Here the brigade suffered severely from the enfilading
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