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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
o Ewell's brigade. The new Seventh brigade, distinctively Mississippian, was distinguished in October, 1861, in the battle of Leesburg, in honor of which General Johnston issued an order of congratulation, declaring that the skill and courage with which this victory has been achieved entitle Colonel Evans and the Seventh brigade to the thanks of the army. Associated with the Mississippians in this victory were the Eighth Virginia and Jenifer's cavalry. At the time of the combat the Potomac river was the line between the Northern and Southern armies in the vicinity of Leesburg, where, and from that place to Goose Creek, Evans' brigade was stationed. On October 20th, in obedience to orders, Gen. Charles P. Stone, commanding the Federal forces on the opposite side of the river, made demonstrations at Harrison's Island and Edwards Ferry, sending a small reconnoissance toward Leesburg from the former and shelling the Confederate forces within range on Goose Creek. Colonel Barksdale'
Newton (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
had been distinguished for coolness and gallantry, was the last to leave the Florida post. The Third Mississippi, Col. J. B. Deason, was on duty during 1861 at New Orleans and on the coast. It was composed of coast men, and though ordered up to Columbus in December, 1861, was soon afterward sent back for service on the Mississippi coast. Also at New Orleans were the Seventh regiment, Colonel Goode, and Vaiden's artillery. The Twenty-fourth regiment, Col. W. F. Dowd, was stationed at Tallahassee, and several companies at Mobile. All of these were ordered back to Mississippi late in 1861 and early in 1862, to meet the threatened invasion from the north. It was in Virginia, however, that Mississippians won the greatest military distinction during the first year of the war. Before the battle of Manassas, five excellent regiments had been sent to the two armies in northern Virginia. The Second, Col. W. C. Falkner, and Eleventh, Col. Wm. H. Moore, were attached to the Third brig
Yazoo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
bert A. Smith. Company B, Ben Bullard Rifles, Itawamba county, Capt. Jas. H. Bullard. Company C, Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Columbus, Capt. George H. Lipscomb. Company G, Hill City Cadets, Vicksburg, Capt. Jesse E. White. Company H, Rankin Rifles, Rankin county, Capt. Geo. M. Miller. Company I, Yazoo Rifles, Yazoo county, Capt. S. M. Phillips, H. Powell, H. P. Garrison. Company K, Port Gibson Rifles, Claiborne county, Capt. William McKeever. The Ninth and Tenth, the Castor and Pollux of the Mississippi regiments of volunteers, rose and fell with the Confederacy, fighting side by side from start to finish, and, only because their ranks had been thinned in battle, were consolidated at Smithfield, North Carolina, in April, 1865, standing after consolidation as the Ninth Mississippi regiment, officered as
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
had reached the scene of battle, was ordered to attack the enemy's left flank, and made a gallant charge, the force of which was broken by an unexpected and heavy fire from a body of the enemy concealed in a ravine. Now the Seventeenth came up, breathless after a double-quick march of two miles, to the support of Colonel Burt, and the fight raged with increased severity. In one of the early charges of his gallant regiment, Colonel Burt fell mortally wounded. This hero was a native of South Carolina. In speaking of his untimely death, Governor Pettus, in a message to the legislature, said: It is my painful duty to inform you that Col. E. R. Burt, auditor of public accounts, fell mortally wounded at the battle of Leesburg, while gallantly leading a regiment of Mississippi's brave sons to one of the most brilliant victories which has crowned our arms during the war. The battle raged all day, finally culminating toward six o'clock in a gallant charge all along the Confederate line.
Copiah county (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
atobia, Capt. Robert R. Bowdrie. Company K, Panola Guards, Panola county, Capt. B. Moore. Tenth regiment, S. M. Phillips, colonel; Jos. R. Davis, lieutenant-colonel; E. H. Gregory, major; H. Powell, adjutant. Company A, Mississippi Rifles, Capt. Robert A. Smith. Company B, Ben Bullard Rifles, Itawamba county, Capt. Jas. H. Bullard. Company C, Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Columbus, Capt. George H. Lipscomb. Company G, Hill City Cadets, Vicksburg, Capt. Jesse E. White. Company H, Rankin Rifles, Rankin county, Capt. Geo. M. Miller. Company I, Yazoo Rifles, Yazoo county, Capt. S. M. Phillips, H. Powell, H. P. Garrison. Company K, Port Gibson Rifles, Claiborne county, Capt. William McKeever. The Ninth and Tenth, the Castor and Pollux of the Mississippi regiments of volunteers, rose and fell with the Con
Panola (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
y C, Corinth Rifles, Tishomingo county, Capt. W. H. Kirkpatrick. Company D, Jeff Davis Rifles, Marshall county, Capt. Samuel Benton. Company E, Horn Lake Volunteers, De Soto county, Capt. John W. Foster. Company F, Quitman Rifle Guard, Marshall county, Capt. Robert McGowan. Company G, De Soto Guards, De Soto county, Capt. S. O. B. Crockett. Company H, LaFayette Guards, LaFayette county, Capt. Wm. Delay. Company I, Invincibles, Senatobia, Capt. Robert R. Bowdrie. Company K, Panola Guards, Panola county, Capt. B. Moore. Tenth regiment, S. M. Phillips, colonel; Jos. R. Davis, lieutenant-colonel; E. H. Gregory, major; H. Powell, adjutant. Company A, Mississippi Rifles, Capt. Robert A. Smith. Company B, Ben Bullard Rifles, Itawamba county, Capt. Jas. H. Bullard. Company C, Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Colum
Itawamba County (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
hall county, Capt. Robert McGowan. Company G, De Soto Guards, De Soto county, Capt. S. O. B. Crockett. Company H, LaFayette Guards, LaFayette county, Capt. Wm. Delay. Company I, Invincibles, Senatobia, Capt. Robert R. Bowdrie. Company K, Panola Guards, Panola county, Capt. B. Moore. Tenth regiment, S. M. Phillips, colonel; Jos. R. Davis, lieutenant-colonel; E. H. Gregory, major; H. Powell, adjutant. Company A, Mississippi Rifles, Capt. Robert A. Smith. Company B, Ben Bullard Rifles, Itawamba county, Capt. Jas. H. Bullard. Company C, Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Columbus, Capt. George H. Lipscomb. Company G, Hill City Cadets, Vicksburg, Capt. Jesse E. White. Company H, Rankin Rifles, Rankin county, Capt. Geo. M. Miller. Company I, Yazoo Rifles, Yazoo county, Capt. S. M. Phillips, H. Powell, H. P. Garris
Lowndes (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
aFayette county, Capt. Wm. Delay. Company I, Invincibles, Senatobia, Capt. Robert R. Bowdrie. Company K, Panola Guards, Panola county, Capt. B. Moore. Tenth regiment, S. M. Phillips, colonel; Jos. R. Davis, lieutenant-colonel; E. H. Gregory, major; H. Powell, adjutant. Company A, Mississippi Rifles, Capt. Robert A. Smith. Company B, Ben Bullard Rifles, Itawamba county, Capt. Jas. H. Bullard. Company C, Madison Rifles, Madison county, Capt. Jos. R. Davis. Company D, Lowndes Southrons, Lowndes county, Capt. W. T. Wade. Company E, Bahalah Rifles, Copiah county, Capt. Octavius Gibbs. Company F, Southern Avengers, Columbus, Capt. George H. Lipscomb. Company G, Hill City Cadets, Vicksburg, Capt. Jesse E. White. Company H, Rankin Rifles, Rankin county, Capt. Geo. M. Miller. Company I, Yazoo Rifles, Yazoo county, Capt. S. M. Phillips, H. Powell, H. P. Garrison. Company K, Port Gibson Rifles, Claiborne county, Capt. William McKeever. The Ninth and Tenth, the Castor and Pollux of the Miss
Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ree or four regiments of infantry and one or two squadrons of cavalry at Edwards Ferry, which were held in check by Colonel Barksdale. The battle was not a great one, but it was one of the most famous of the war on account of the deep feeling it produced in the North. The death of Colonel Baker, and the terrible scene of defeat at the bluff, aroused a storm of censure, which was turned against General Stone and caused his arrest and imprisonment for six months in close confinement at Fort Hamilton, one of the most remarkable examples of a survival of the oriental treatment of defeated generals in the history of North America. To Mississippians the battle has a peculiar interest on account of the great share of the honors which fell to the gallant sons of the State who participated. On December 8, 1861, the Mississippi regiments in the Potomac district were ordered to be organized in brigades as follows: Second, Col. W. C. Falkner; Eleventh, Col. W. H. Moore; Thirteenth, Col. W
Vaiden (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
seventh Mississippi, which had been assigned to Fort McRee and adjacent batteries and had been distinguished for coolness and gallantry, was the last to leave the Florida post. The Third Mississippi, Col. J. B. Deason, was on duty during 1861 at New Orleans and on the coast. It was composed of coast men, and though ordered up to Columbus in December, 1861, was soon afterward sent back for service on the Mississippi coast. Also at New Orleans were the Seventh regiment, Colonel Goode, and Vaiden's artillery. The Twenty-fourth regiment, Col. W. F. Dowd, was stationed at Tallahassee, and several companies at Mobile. All of these were ordered back to Mississippi late in 1861 and early in 1862, to meet the threatened invasion from the north. It was in Virginia, however, that Mississippians won the greatest military distinction during the first year of the war. Before the battle of Manassas, five excellent regiments had been sent to the two armies in northern Virginia. The Second,
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