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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Woodville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
or the army in the whole department. * * * The Jackson manufactory makes 5,000 garments weekly. The material is cut out in the city by experienced and industrious tailors, and distributed over the country in Hinds and adjoining counties to be made up. Soldiers' wives and destitute families are always supplied with work first, thus enabling them to support themselves while lending a helping hand to the cause. Similar factories at Bankston, Choctaw county, Columbus, Enterprise, Natchez and Woodville make up 500 per week, the sewing of which is distributed in the same way. The hat factories at Jackson and Columbus make 200 hats per day. We also have a manufactory at Jackson which turns out 50 blankets per day. The Pemberton works at Enterprise, and Dixie works at Canton, make not less than 60 wagons and ambulances per week. * * * Arrangements are now being made to start an extensive government shoe-shop, with a capacity of turning out 6,000 pairs of shoes per month. * * * The most exte
Caffey (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e in line of battle on the morning of the 18th, and the enemy formed a line in opposition, but nothing followed but some skirmishing. An advance was again ordered on the 20th, Van Dorn to move to Farmington and drive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; Polk and Breckinridge to form north of town and take the enemy in flank and rear. Rain compelled a day's postponement. On the 21st there was a brisk fight at te to strike a successful blow at the enemy if he follows, which will enable you to gain the ascendency and drive him back to the Ohio. On the 28th, Col. Joseph Wheeler, then in command of an infantry brigade, being ordered to the front on the Monterey road found Lieutenant-Colonel Mills, with about 200 men from the Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Twenty-ninth Mississippi, and two guns of Robertson's battery, stoutly contesting an advance of the enemy in force. Colonel Mills, General Wheeler report
Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
bile, leaving the army of the West at Tupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with him parts of Jackson's, Wade's, Pinson's and Slemon's regiments, in all about 1,000 men. General Villepigue was in command at Holly Springs, from whom he hoped to obtain reinforcements, but was obliged to leave Jackson's regiment with him instead, and he proceeded to Bolivar and Jackson, Tenn., with about 500 men. With this force he penetrated some seventy miles behind the Federal lines, destroyed the railroad bridges in their rear, and fought in eight separate engagements, in all but one of which the Confederates were victorious. Many prisoners were taken and much cotton and railroad property destroyed. For about two months from this date there was little activity in northeast Mississippi, except in the way of raids and expeditions. Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Ar
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
year; * * * but a small crop of cotton planted, which shows the good sense of our people. On April 29, 1863, the corporate authorities of Columbus wrote to President Davis: We beg to say that our patriotic planters had, to a large extent, anticipated your recent proclamation, and have planted their broad prairie acres in grain and other articles for the subsistence of the army. In fact, sir, our country is one vast cornfield which if protected from the enemy will, under the smiles of Providence, furnish an amount of provisions that will relieve the western army from all fear of want. Says The Mississippi, a newspaper published at Jackson, in March, 1863, in an editorial: The subsistence, the clothing and the camp equipage for a tremendous army have been exclusively drawn from the State of Mississippi, and this too, when several of her most populous and productive counties have been under the control of the enemy. Mississippi manufacturers have made nearly all the material use
Hinds county (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ing and the camp equipage for a tremendous army have been exclusively drawn from the State of Mississippi, and this too, when several of her most populous and productive counties have been under the control of the enemy. Mississippi manufacturers have made nearly all the material used for the army in the whole department. * * * The Jackson manufactory makes 5,000 garments weekly. The material is cut out in the city by experienced and industrious tailors, and distributed over the country in Hinds and adjoining counties to be made up. Soldiers' wives and destitute families are always supplied with work first, thus enabling them to support themselves while lending a helping hand to the cause. Similar factories at Bankston, Choctaw county, Columbus, Enterprise, Natchez and Woodville make up 500 per week, the sewing of which is distributed in the same way. The hat factories at Jackson and Columbus make 200 hats per day. We also have a manufactory at Jackson which turns out 50 blankets p
Bankston (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
anufacturers have made nearly all the material used for the army in the whole department. * * * The Jackson manufactory makes 5,000 garments weekly. The material is cut out in the city by experienced and industrious tailors, and distributed over the country in Hinds and adjoining counties to be made up. Soldiers' wives and destitute families are always supplied with work first, thus enabling them to support themselves while lending a helping hand to the cause. Similar factories at Bankston, Choctaw county, Columbus, Enterprise, Natchez and Woodville make up 500 per week, the sewing of which is distributed in the same way. The hat factories at Jackson and Columbus make 200 hats per day. We also have a manufactory at Jackson which turns out 50 blankets per day. The Pemberton works at Enterprise, and Dixie works at Canton, make not less than 60 wagons and ambulances per week. * * * Arrangements are now being made to start an extensive government shoe-shop, with a capacity of turning out
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he army of the West at Tupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with him parts of Jackson's, Wade's, Pinson's and Slemon's regiments, in all about 1,000 men. General Villepigue was in command at Holly Springs, from whom he hoped to obtain reinforcements, but was obliged to leave Jackson's regiment with him instead, and he proceeded to Bolivar and Jackson, Tenn., with about 500 men. With this force he penetrated some seventy miles behind the Federal lines, destroyed the railroad bridges in their rear, and fought in eight separate engagements, in all but one of which the Confederates were victorious. Many prisoners were taken and much cotton and railroad property destroyed. For about two months from this date there was little activity in northeast Mississippi, except in the way of raids and expeditions. Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong, chief o
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he district of the Gulf, all the country east of the Pearl river to the Apalachicola, and as far north as the thirty-second parallel, about the latitude of Quitman. General Polk was made second in command under Bragg, and the immediate command of the army of the Mississippi was given to General Hardee. On June 10th, Chalmers, promoted brigadier-general, had been assigned to command of all the cavalry in front of the army of the Mississippi. On June 30th he was ordered to make a feint on Rienzi, to cover a movement of the Reserve corps toward Ripley, by which it was hoped to destroy the Memphis & Charleston railroad to the west of Corinth. Chalmers encountered Col. P. H. Sheridan's brigade of cavalry on the morning of July 1st, near Booneville, and a stubborn fight followed which lasted during most of the day and resulted in Chalmers retiring from the field. Sheridan was entitled to great credit for withstanding Chalmers, but some unmerited glory was attached to his name by the e
came to avoid a repetition of April 6th, had been reinforced by General Pope–flushed by the appropriation of the glory which belonged to the ive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; Polk and Breckinridbetween Thomas' command, lately Grant's, and the corps of Buell and Pope. At the same time Polk and Breckinridge took position fronting the on the 30th, said that on the 29th advances were made by Thomas and Pope, with heavy cannonading, but not a response of any kind was elicitedmber of prisoners and deserters have been captured, estimated by General Pope [a romantic authority] at 2,000. Next day he sent word that Cold and paroled 2,000 prisoners. And on June 4th, he telegraphed: General Pope, with 40,000 men, is 30 miles south of Florence, pushing the enntic retreat was that he made such a stand on the way to Tupelo that Pope dared not attack him, and though reinforced by Buell, did not ventur
J. B. Morgan (search for this): chapter 5
th of the Memphis & Charleston railroad. On the 10th he advanced and attacked the enemy's right at Farmington; but the Federals retreated with such expedition that an engagement could not be brought on, and nothing resulted but the burning of the bridge, and the capture of a few prisoners and a considerable lot of arms and property. The Thirty-seventh Mississippi was in this action, and was commended by General Ruggles, who particularly complimented its commander, Colonel Benton, and Lieutenant Morgan, who continued to lead a company after being wounded. Gen. Patton Anderson reported of Col. D. J. Brown's regiment: A large portion of the Thirty-sixth Mississippi regiment, although never having formed a line of battle or heard a hostile gun before, behaved with that gallantry and spirit which characterize the troops of that chivalrous State on every field. The loss of the regiment was one killed and ten wounded. Col. Samuel Benton, of the Thirty-seventh, wrote of the service of hi
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