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Nathan B. Forrest (search for this): chapter 5
were begun under Capt. D. B. Harris, chief of engineers. Colonel Autry was at this time military commander at Vicksburg. Capt. Ed. A. Porter reported from Holly Springs, June 6th, that, acting under orders, he had caused to be burned in Fayette, Shelby and Tipton counties, Tenn., and Marshall and De Soto counties, Miss., upwards of 30,000 bales of cotton, meeting with little opposition from the planters, who were generally ready to make this sacrifice for the good of the country. Col. N. B. Forrest was also directed to perform this work of patriotic destruction south of the Tennessee river. On June 20th, General Braxton Bragg succeeded Beauregard in permanent command of Department No. 2, including all of Mississippi, and the work of reorganization of the army at Tupelo continued. On July 2d he assigned General Van Dorn to the command of the district of the Mississippi, embracing all the State west of Pearl river and the Mississippi Central railroad; and Gen. John H. Forney t
McClellan (search for this): chapter 5
ce our army will have to transport its supplies. * * * I look upon the evacuation there as a victory for Beauregard, or at least as one of the most masterly pieces of strategy that has been displayed during this war. It prolongs the contest in the Southwest for at least six months. This modest estimate of the prolongation of the war is an evidence of the prevalent idea at times both South and North. Jackson had not yet concluded his campaign in the Shenandoah valley, nor had Lee driven McClellan from before Richmond. Halleck, meanwhile, sent north dispatches of the most remarkable character. He first telegraphed that the enemy's position and works in front of Corinth were exceedingly strong. He cannot occupy a stronger position in his flight. This morning he destroyed an immense amount of public and private property, stores, provisions, wagons, tents, etc. For miles out of town the roads are filled with arms, haversacks, etc., thrown away by his fleeing troops. A large numb
John J. Pettus (search for this): chapter 5
rtion. If invaded, she could send to battle 10,000 or 15,000 more, but she cannot put more in service for twelve months. It has occurred to me that General Johnston was not aware of the strain on our population already created. * * * The disposition of the people is to give everything and do everything necessary; but the preservation of the crops, order and safety require that a certain number of active men should remain within the State. On May 2, 1863, President Davis telegraphed Governor Pettus: Can you aid General Pemberton by furnishing for short service militia or persons exempt from military service, who may be temporarily organized to repel the invasion? The stout-hearted and iron-willed war governor answered back the same day: The people are turning out, from fifty to sixty. Mississippi is more seriously threatened than ever before. Reinforcements necessary. Send me arms and ammunition. Our people will fight. And so, from 60,001 free white men in the State in 1860
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 5
evalent while this great army was held inactive. The assignment of Mississippi commands in this army was as follows: In Polk's First corps, Maxey's brigade, Twenty-fourth infantry, Stanford's and Smith's batteries. In Bragg's Second corps, Chalmeive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; Polk and Breckinridge to form north of town and take the enemy in flank and rear. Rain compelled a day's postponement. On tf pushed would have thrown us between Thomas' command, lately Grant's, and the corps of Buell and Pope. At the same time Polk and Breckinridge took position fronting the Purdy road. But Van Dorn, having been sent on a circuitous route toward Farmif the Pearl river to the Apalachicola, and as far north as the thirty-second parallel, about the latitude of Quitman. General Polk was made second in command under Bragg, and the immediate command of the army of the Mississippi was given to General
W. H. Jackson (search for this): chapter 5
es of strategy that has been displayed during this war. It prolongs the contest in the Southwest for at least six months. This modest estimate of the prolongation of the war is an evidence of the prevalent idea at times both South and North. Jackson had not yet concluded his campaign in the Shenandoah valley, nor had Lee driven McClellan from before Richmond. Halleck, meanwhile, sent north dispatches of the most remarkable character. He first telegraphed that the enemy's position and wo closely to Corinth, as well as clearing them from West Tennessee. During this period of the summer, while the attention of the South was mainly directed to the aggressive movements of Bragg toward Cincinnati and Louisville, and the victories of Lee and Jackson on the plains of Manassas, let us turn to the field of operations in Van Dorn's department and review what had been done in the struggle for the possession of the great river which the Confederacy must hold to preserve its integrity.
Charles Clark (search for this): chapter 5
That the women of the State of Mississippi, for their exertions in behalf of the cause of Southern Independence, are entitled to the hearty thanks of every lover of his country; and this legislature, acting from a sense of justice and of gratitude, extend to them individually and collectively the sincere thanks of the people of this State for their noble efforts in aiding the cause of our common country. In his inaugural address to the legislature, November 16, 1863, on this subject, Governor Clark said: One of the most gratifying indications of the times is the resolute spirit of industry manifested by our women. The spinning-wheel is preferred to the harp, and the loom makes music of loftier patriotism and inspiration than the keys of the piano. In a memorial to the Confederate Congress, approved August 2, 1861, in reference to buying and holding all cotton and tobacco as a basis of credit, this language occurs: We, the representatives of a united people determined to prosecu
Robertson (search for this): chapter 5
of his arrangements; but expressing the hope, in case retreat was inevitable, that Beauregard would be able to strike a successful blow at the enemy if he follows, which will enable you to gain the ascendency and drive him back to the Ohio. On the 28th, Col. Joseph Wheeler, then in command of an infantry brigade, being ordered to the front on the Monterey road found Lieutenant-Colonel Mills, with about 200 men from the Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Twenty-ninth Mississippi, and two guns of Robertson's battery, stoutly contesting an advance of the enemy in force. Colonel Mills, General Wheeler reported, had been driven back about half a mile by a superior force, who had established themselves in a densely-wooded swamp so favorable that this gallant officer had been baffled in repeated attempts to permanently re-establish his line of pickets. On the next day the united force of the Confederates drove the enemy from their position and then retreated in the night to Corinth. General Be
James Chalmers (search for this): chapter 5
m Shiloh the loss of 10,699 was rapidly repaired, raising the aggregate to 64,500, effective total 32,212. About a month later the aggregate was 112,092, but the effective total was only 52,706, largely on account of the sickness which was terribly prevalent while this great army was held inactive. The assignment of Mississippi commands in this army was as follows: In Polk's First corps, Maxey's brigade, Twenty-fourth infantry, Stanford's and Smith's batteries. In Bragg's Second corps, Chalmers' brigade, Fifth, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade, Thirty-third infantry. In Breckinridge's corps, Statham's brigade, Fifteenth and Twenty-second infantry. In Van Dorn's army, Ruggles division, Anderson's brigade, Thirty-sixth infantry; Walker's brigade, Thirty-seventh infantry. On May 6th, General Bragg was given immediate command of the army of the Mississippi, General Beauregard retaining general command of the combi
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 5
nth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade, Thirty-third infantry. In Breckinridge's corps, Statham's brigade, Fifteenth and Twenty-second infantry. In Van Dorn's army, Ruggles division, Anderson's br hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; Polk and Breckinridge to form north of town and take the enemy in flank and rear. Rain compelled a day's postponement. On the 21st thered have thrown us between Thomas' command, lately Grant's, and the corps of Buell and Pope. At the same time Polk and Breckinridge took position fronting the Purdy road. But Van Dorn, having been sent on a circuitous route toward Farmington, was no, and the field return at Tupelo an effective total of 45,365, the reduction being caused in part by the detachment of Breckinridge's corps. General Beauregard in his conversation with me referred me, for further and more detailed information of the
Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 5
cial reports. Meanwhile there had been important changes in the Federal army. Halleck, having achieved fame through the occupation of Corinth, was called to Washington to take the position of general-in-chief, and Grant was put in command of all troops west of the Tennessee river, with instructions to send Thomas into Tennessee to reinforce Buell, who had previously left Corinth to operate against Chattanooga. The latter town was now the objective of the Federal armies, and Grant and Rosecrans contented themselves with occupying Corinth. Hardee started for Chattanooga on July 21st with the army of the Mississippi, the infantry being sent by rail via Mobile, leaving the army of the West at Tupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with him parts of Jackson's, Wade's, Pinson's and Slemon's regiments, in all about 1,000 men. General Ville
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