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George P. Wallace (search for this): chapter 5
re turning out, from fifty to sixty. Mississippi is more seriously threatened than ever before. Reinforcements necessary. Send me arms and ammunition. Our people will fight. And so, from 60,001 free white men in the State in 1860-61 between ages of 21 and 50, Mississippi on August 1, 1863, had furnished to the Confederacy 63,908 volunteer soldiers. (See House Journal, November, 1862, and November, 1863, appendix, p. 76.) There has been no such exhibition of patriotism since Bruce and Wallace left the craigs of Scotland for battle. After the surrender of Island No.10, General Beauregard ordered the destruction of cotton along the Mississippi river, to prevent its falling into the hands of the enemy, and apprehensions were entertained that Vicksburg might soon be attacked by the Federals. Some troops were sent there, and fortifications were begun under Capt. D. B. Harris, chief of engineers. Colonel Autry was at this time military commander at Vicksburg. Capt. Ed. A. Port
th, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade, Thirty-third infantry. In Breckinrarmington and drive the enemy hotly on roads to Monterey and Purdy; Hardee to attack Pope if he attempted to effect a junction with Buell; PolVan Dorn was received stating that at noon, after a conference with Hardee and Price, he had determined to return to his intrenchments, findin. On the 25th, after a consultation with General Beauregard, General Hardee, an officer whose fighting qualities and sound judgment have neday's delay might have proved fatal to the army. The letter of General Hardee, approved by General Beauregard, expresses the well-settled cone immediate command of the army of the Mississippi was given to General Hardee. On June 10th, Chalmers, promoted brigadier-general, had beeGrant and Rosecrans contented themselves with occupying Corinth. Hardee started for Chattanooga on July 21st with the army of the Mississip
Patton Anderson (search for this): chapter 5
venth, Ninth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade, Thirty-third infantry. In Breckinridge's corps, Statham's brigade, Fifteenth and Twenty-second infantry. In Van Dorn's army, Ruggles division, Anderson's brigade, Thirty-sixth infantry; Walker's brigade, Thirty-seventh infantry. On May 6th, General Bragg was given immediate command of the army of the Mississippi, General Beauregard retaining general command of the combined forces. The Federd property. The Thirty-seventh Mississippi was in this action, and was commended by General Ruggles, who particularly complimented its commander, Colonel Benton, and Lieutenant Morgan, who continued to lead a company after being wounded. Gen. Patton Anderson reported of Col. D. J. Brown's regiment: A large portion of the Thirty-sixth Mississippi regiment, although never having formed a line of battle or heard a hostile gun before, behaved with that gallantry and spirit which characterize the
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 5
olf and would fight like one. It was still intended to attack, when a telegram from Van Dorn was received stating that at noon, after a conference with Hardee and Price, he had determined to return to his intrenchments, finding difficulties that had so delayed him that it was too late to begin a general engagement. On the 25th,rted for Chattanooga on July 21st with the army of the Mississippi, the infantry being sent by rail via Mobile, leaving the army of the West at Tupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with from this date there was little activity in northeast Mississippi, except in the way of raids and expeditions. Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong, chief of cavalry of Price's army, brought that arm of the service in Mississippi to an excellent condition, and restricted the Federals pretty closely to Corinth, as well as clearing them f
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 5
egard indorsed: I concur fully in the above views, and already all needful preparations are being made for a proper and prompt evacuation of this place. Gen. Robert E. Lee, being advised of the emergency, wrote to Beauregard expressing confidence in the wisdom of his arrangements; but expressing the hope, in case retreat was ingation of the war is an evidence of the prevalent idea at times both South and North. Jackson had not yet concluded his campaign in the Shenandoah valley, nor had Lee driven McClellan from before Richmond. Halleck, meanwhile, sent north dispatches of the most remarkable character. He first telegraphed that the enemy's positioriod of the summer, while the attention of the South was mainly directed to the aggressive movements of Bragg toward Cincinnati and Louisville, and the victories of Lee and Jackson on the plains of Manassas, let us turn to the field of operations in Van Dorn's department and review what had been done in the struggle for the possess
James Ronald Chalmers (search for this): chapter 5
immediate command of the army of the Mississippi was given to General Hardee. On June 10th, Chalmers, promoted brigadier-general, had been assigned to command of all the cavalry in front of the arey, by which it was hoped to destroy the Memphis & Charleston railroad to the west of Corinth. Chalmers encountered Col. P. H. Sheridan's brigade of cavalry on the morning of July 1st, near Booneville, and a stubborn fight followed which lasted during most of the day and resulted in Chalmers retiring from the field. Sheridan was entitled to great credit for withstanding Chalmers, but some unmeriChalmers, but some unmerited glory was attached to his name by the exaggerated reports of the strength of the Confederate force. On July 1st and 5th there were minor affairs near Holly Springs and at Hatchie Bottom, of whichupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with him parts o
N. B. Forrest (search for this): chapter 5
this with patience and fortitude, and the heat and fatigue of the day's march, often through thick woods, over fences, ditches and other obstructions. When advancing under fire, their eagerness was such as to require restraint rather than urging forward. He particularly noted the bravery of Privates Clifton Dorney and Howard Fulmer of the skirmish line. It was frequently suggested to Beauregard that Halleck should be attacked or his communications-cut on the Tennessee river; but though Forrest and Wheeler were both with the army, what they could do seems not yet to have been discovered to the superior officers. The general issued an address May 10th, declaring that our motto should be Forward, and always forward; but he had already advised the corps commanders of the route they should take in retreat. General Van Dorn's division was ordered to be in line of battle on the morning of the 18th, and the enemy formed a line in opposition, but nothing followed but some skirmishing.
Earl Van Dorn (search for this): chapter 5
me the great rallying point in the central South. Van Dorn came across the Mississippi with his army of the Wbrigade, Fifteenth and Twenty-second infantry. In Van Dorn's army, Ruggles division, Anderson's brigade, Thirers of the route they should take in retreat. General Van Dorn's division was ordered to be in line of battleishing. An advance was again ordered on the 20th, Van Dorn to move to Farmington and drive the enemy hotly onnridge took position fronting the Purdy road. But Van Dorn, having been sent on a circuitous route toward Farwas still intended to attack, when a telegram from Van Dorn was received stating that at noon, after a conferesplendid results on Sunday, April 6th. When General Van Dorn's army arrived, his effective total was estimay at Tupelo continued. On July 2d he assigned General Van Dorn to the command of the district of the Mississianassas, let us turn to the field of operations in Van Dorn's department and review what had been done in the
Clifton Dorney (search for this): chapter 5
seventh, wrote of the service of his men: A new regiment recently mustered into service, employed in outpost duty the whole of the preceding night and scantily provided with canteens, they bore this with patience and fortitude, and the heat and fatigue of the day's march, often through thick woods, over fences, ditches and other obstructions. When advancing under fire, their eagerness was such as to require restraint rather than urging forward. He particularly noted the bravery of Privates Clifton Dorney and Howard Fulmer of the skirmish line. It was frequently suggested to Beauregard that Halleck should be attacked or his communications-cut on the Tennessee river; but though Forrest and Wheeler were both with the army, what they could do seems not yet to have been discovered to the superior officers. The general issued an address May 10th, declaring that our motto should be Forward, and always forward; but he had already advised the corps commanders of the route they should tak
he objective of the Federal armies, and Grant and Rosecrans contented themselves with occupying Corinth. Hardee started for Chattanooga on July 21st with the army of the Mississippi, the infantry being sent by rail via Mobile, leaving the army of the West at Tupelo under Gen. Sterling Price, and about the same time Gen. Joseph Wheeler, who had succeeded Chalmers in command of the cavalry brigade, was sent on a raid into Tennessee. He took with him parts of Jackson's, Wade's, Pinson's and Slemon's regiments, in all about 1,000 men. General Villepigue was in command at Holly Springs, from whom he hoped to obtain reinforcements, but was obliged to leave Jackson's regiment with him instead, and he proceeded to Bolivar and Jackson, Tenn., with about 500 men. With this force he penetrated some seventy miles behind the Federal lines, destroyed the railroad bridges in their rear, and fought in eight separate engagements, in all but one of which the Confederates were victorious. Many priso
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