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W. H. Jackson (search for this): chapter 7
orinth, but he sent Armstrong with his cavalry into West Tennessee. With 1,600 men he reached Holly Springs, August 26th, and was reinforced by 1,100 under Col. W. H. Jackson. At Bolivar Armstrong defeated a force, then crossed the Hatchie, destroyed the railroad bridges between Jackson and Bolivar, and on the return defeated a Jackson and Bolivar, and on the return defeated a considerable Federal force near Denmark, capturing two pieces of artillery and 213 prisoners. This blow was returned by an expedition from Memphis which burned the railroad bridge across the Coldwater, after a brisk fight between Grierson's cavalry regiment and a portion of Jackson's and Pinson's regiments and two companies of Missnder Gen. John S. Bowen made up of the Sixth, Fifteenth and Twenty-second regiments and Carruthers' battalion, Mississippi infantry, and the First Missouri. Col. W. H. Jackson's cavalry brigade, attached to Lovell's command, consisted of the First Mississippi and Seventh Tennessee. Thirteen batteries were attached to the army, inc
Frank Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
th regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given chJohnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given charge of the line of defenses from Vicksburg to Snyder's Mill on Christmas day, and he at once made skillful arrangements for meeting the enemy. Judging the approaches nearest Vicksburg sufficiently protected by abatis of fallen timber, and the defenheld in check and driven back by Colonel Withers' command, the Forty-sixth Mississippi and two Napoleon guns under Lieutenant Johnston doing admirable work. On the same day a small infantry force which had been landed at Snyder's Mill was withdrawncommended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
tary of war on November 24th assigned Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to command of the region embracing wehe purpose of correspondence and reports, General Johnston was to establish his headquarters at Chater President Davis visited Chattanooga, where Johnston's headquarters were, and going on to Murfreeshey inspected its defenses. While there Generals Johnston and Smith agreed upon an estimate of thertment and Vicksburg, and on December 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclosingim. In this letter among other things, General Johnston said, Our great object is to hold the Miso Gen. T. H. Holmes, inclosing copies of Generals Johnston's and Smith's letters to himself, and after pressing upon him his own as well as General Johnston's view of the vital importance of preventionably the best that you should reinforce General Johnston so as to enable you successfully to meet . Returning to Jackson, Mr. Davis and General Johnston, December 26th, addressed the legislature[5 more...]
, and many of them lost their lives or fell with severe wounds. Most notable among the dead was Col. John D. Martin, who fell mortally wounded while leading his brigade in a charge against an angle in the outer works. Colonel Leigh, of the Forty-third, was also killed, and Major McDonald, of the Fortieth. Among the wounded were Colonels Moore, of the Forty-third, and McLain, of the Thirty-seventh, Lieutenant-Colonels Terral, of the Seventh battalion, and Campbell, of the Fortieth, and Majors Keirn, of the Thirty-eighth, and Yates, of the Thirty-sixth. At four o'clock on the morning of the 4th, the Confederate batteries were in position and opened fire upon the town, and an attack was ordered at daylight; but there was a delay until nine o'clock, ascribed to the illness of General Hebert. Price's command swept forward, notwithstanding heavy loss in the face of the fire of the massed batteries of the enemy, took Battery Powell on the left and forced their way into the town. Moor
Pierre S. Layton (search for this): chapter 7
rn Virginia as a colonel of artillery, was put in command of a provisional division which included a number of regiments and battalions and artillery, among which were the Third Mississippi, Third battalion State troops, Fourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery,over the lake on his right, which was thwarted by a few well-directed shots from Wofford's battery and Lieutenant Tarleton's section of Ward's artillery. To meet the effort to pontoon, Lee pushed his line two regiments to the left and called Colonel Layton's Fourth Mississippi from Snyder's Mill. Morgan protested against the proposed assault, but Sherman was determined that it should be made, and it is related that he said that 5,000 men would be lost before Vicksburg could be taken, and the
Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 7
ssippi cavalry at Marietta, was attacked by Colonel Lee, and made a safe retreat toward the headqua the Alabama brigade of E. D. Tracy. Brig.-Gen. Stephen D. Lee, a distinguished soldier who had beetillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given charge of the line of defenses frnd lake. Early on the morning of the 27th, General Lee reported, the enemy appeared in force and ahe advance of Steele on the levee had given General Lee much uneasiness, and he had increased his finted out. Early on the morning of the 29th, Lee withdrew Hall from the rifle-pits beyond the lad the tangled marsh, to the dry ground on which Lee awaited him. Morgan advanced cautiously and toord's artillery. To meet the effort to pontoon, Lee pushed his line two regiments to the left and ce Federal regiments engaged. After 10 a. m., Lee reported, a furious cannonade was opened on my for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, followin[4 more...]
oad, near Price, with Villepigue and Bowen in front and Rust in reserve. Thus, night coming on, the victorious army slept upon their arms within six hundred yards of Corinth. In this successful onslaught, the sons of Mississippi were unsurpassed in valorous achievement, and many of them lost their lives or fell with severe wounds. Most notable among the dead was Col. John D. Martin, who fell mortally wounded while leading his brigade in a charge against an angle in the outer works. Colonel Leigh, of the Forty-third, was also killed, and Major McDonald, of the Fortieth. Among the wounded were Colonels Moore, of the Forty-third, and McLain, of the Thirty-seventh, Lieutenant-Colonels Terral, of the Seventh battalion, and Campbell, of the Fortieth, and Majors Keirn, of the Thirty-eighth, and Yates, of the Thirty-sixth. At four o'clock on the morning of the 4th, the Confederate batteries were in position and opened fire upon the town, and an attack was ordered at daylight; but t
Henry Little (search for this): chapter 7
pel an attack from the north than the south, his pickets were driven in by Rosecrans' advance on the Jacinto road. Gen. Henry Little, who commanded one of the two divisions of the army, was ordered to meet this attack. He sent Louis Hebert's briga on both sides. Price and Little, riding into the thickest of the fray, determined to order up the other two brigades of Little's division, as it was apparent that the Federal force was much the larger. In fact, in addition to Hamilton's division, ama. When they reached the field, Colonel Martin led the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in person conducted the Thirtysev-enth and Thirty-eighth on the right. Martin pressed forward gallantly, pushing thel. Robert Mc-Lain, and Thirty-eighth, Col. F. W. Adams, were ordered to the front and under heavy fire, but on account of Little's death did not take an active part in the battle. The regimental loss in killed and wounded was, Thirty-sixth, 22; Thir
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
Mansfield Lovell (search for this): chapter 7
e West, and Van Dorn's command under Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. Price's corps included two divishe two regiments of Slemons and Wirt Adams. Lovell's division included three infantry brigades—th. W. H. Jackson's cavalry brigade, attached to Lovell's command, consisted of the First Mississippi & Charleston and Mobile & Ohio railroads, and Lovell on his right, after some heavy skirmishing. ntrenchments, and the attack was soon begun by Lovell's division, and extended gradually along the wrmost works around the town. At the same time Lovell drove the enemy across Indian creek, made an ipreparations were at once made for retreat. Lovell's division, which had not attacked on the mornduced from 10,000 to between 5,000 and 6,000. Lovell has not suffered a great deal. The enemy's foon, 246 killed, 832 wounded and 1,449 missing; Lovell's division, 77 killed, 285 wounded, 208 missif the army of West Tennessee, which was mainly Lovell's division, and Price in command of his army o[4 more...]
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