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October 1st (search for this): chapter 7
d call in his outposts. On the morning of September 29th he marched out of Ripley and made a feint toward Pocahontas, threatening Bolivar. Grant reported on October 1st, For several days there has been a movement of the rebels south of my front, which left in doubt whether Bolivar or Corinth was to be the point of attack. It it as far as Summerville, having effectually screened Van Dorn's movements. But he had correctly solved the puzzle in time to save Rosecrans, whom he ordered on October 1st to call in his outposts, increasing his force at Corinth to 23,000, and Hurlbut at Bolivar was instructed to watch Van Dorn, this order being followed on the 3dby Grant, who ordered an expedition to cover his return which went seven miles south of Grand Junction and destroyed the railroad bridge at Davis' Mills. On October 1st, Lieut.-Gen. John C. Pemberton had been assigned to the command of the department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and he assumed his duties October 12th, Van
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 7
alry, thrown out as far as Summerville, having effectually screened Van Dorn's movements. But he had correctly solved the puzzle in time to save Rosecrans, whom he ordered on October 1st to call in his outposts, increasing his force at Corinth to 23,000, and Hurlbut at Bolivar was instructed to watch Van Dorn, this order being followed on the 3d by orders to attack the Confederate rear by way of Pocahontas. Van Dorn having repaired the bridge over the Hatchie, crossed on the evening of October 2d—leaving Adams' cavalry to guard the rear and protect the train which was parked between the Hatchie and Tuscumbia—and marched to Chewalla, about ten miles from Corinth, driving back a detachment which Rosecrans had sent in that direction. At daybreak on the 3d the march was resumed, following the railroad; and as the old Confederate intrenchments were approached, about three miles from the town, Price formed in line of battle between the Memphis & Charleston and Mobile & Ohio railroads,
October 12th (search for this): chapter 7
ition and a large lot of accouterments. Van Dom retreated to Holly Springs but little disturbed by the pursuit of Rosecrans, who, when he had reached Ripley, was ordered back by Grant, who ordered an expedition to cover his return which went seven miles south of Grand Junction and destroyed the railroad bridge at Davis' Mills. On October 1st, Lieut.-Gen. John C. Pemberton had been assigned to the command of the department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and he assumed his duties October 12th, Van Dorn remaining in command of the forces in the field. In the reorganization of the Confederate forces which followed, the Mississippi infantry in the army of the West was concentrated in a brigade of Maury's division, consisting of the Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, Fortieth, and Forty-third regiments and Seventh battalion. With the 1st of November General Grant began a movement on Grand Junction with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar.
November 1st (search for this): chapter 7
een assigned to the command of the department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and he assumed his duties October 12th, Van Dorn remaining in command of the forces in the field. In the reorganization of the Confederate forces which followed, the Mississippi infantry in the army of the West was concentrated in a brigade of Maury's division, consisting of the Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, Fortieth, and Forty-third regiments and Seventh battalion. With the 1st of November General Grant began a movement on Grand Junction with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. If found practicable, he telegraphed Halleck, I will go on to Holly Springs and maybe Grenada, completing railroad and telegraph as I go. At the same time an expedition was prepared at Memphis to sail down the river against Vicksburg, of which Sherman was finally given command on Grant's insistence. Butler was expected to make a similar expedition up the river from New Orleans, a
November 9th (search for this): chapter 7
rtis was instructed to send troops across the Mississippi against Grenada. The combination was a formidable one, and contemplated the concentration of about 100,000 men for the purpose of capturing Vicksburg, and in fact securing possession of the whole of northern Mississippi. Pemberton had a very small force to oppose this gigantic combination, and he made urgent calls for reinforcements as early as October, when it became apparent what was on foot. Grant was at La Grange, Tenn., November 9th, and a cavalry reconnoissance sent on toward Holly Springs discovered that that place had been evacuated. On the 9th General Pemberton had ordered Van Dorn and Price and Lovell back to the south bank of the Tallahatchie, where fortifications were begun. Price was posted between Abbeville and the Tallahatchie bridge, Lovell near the ford at the mouth of the Tippah, and General George with his State troops put on guard at Oxford. Grant brought his army up to Holly Springs about two weeks
November 24th (search for this): chapter 7
lta and Friar's Point and moved toward Charleston. Pemberton again called for reinforcements, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and Holmes send over 10,000 men from Arkansas. Bragg replied that he would order Forrest to make a diversion in West Tennessee, and Holmes positively refused to lend any assistance, on the ground that such a step would lose Arkansas to the Confederacy. Recognizing the gravity of the situation, the secretary of war on November 24th assigned Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to command of the region embracing western North Carolina, Tennessee, northern Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and eastern Louisiana, Lieutenant-General Pemberton remaining in command in Mississippi, with Van Dorn in command of the army of West Tennessee, which was mainly Lovell's division, and Price in command of his army of the West, now reduced to some 4,000 men, who were all anxious to recross the Mississippi, but were held under orders which Price loya
,000 in property and 1,500 men taken prisoners. He at once fell back to Holly Springs and occupied the line of the Tallahatchie, abandoning the plan of advancing between the Big Black and Yazoo to meet Sherman on the latter river. Van Dorn also attacked Davis' Mill, but without so much success. About the same time a Federal raid had been made from Corinth down the Mobile & Ohio railroad as far as Tupelo, and the forces made an ineffectual effort to check Van Dorn at Pontotoc. Early in December President Davis visited Chattanooga, where Johnston's headquarters were, and going on to Murfreesboro, consulted with General Bragg regarding the reinforcement of Vicksburg. On his return to Chattanooga he ordered General Johnston to detach 10,000 men under Gen. C. L. Stevenson to report at Vicksburg. The President and General Johnston then visited Mississippi together, and reaching Jackson on December 19th found the legislature in session, it having been called together by Governor Pettu
December 1st (search for this): chapter 7
ber 5th the advance of Grant on the Central railroad, the movement of Hovey and starting of Sherman down the Mississippi, adding that at the same time a demonstration was made from below on Port Hudson, La., within his department. He stated that Port Hudson was now held by about 5,500 men strongly intrenched; that Vicksburg was strongly fortified and held by about 6,000 men under General Smith; while he had confronting Grant, including cavalry and artillery, about 22,000 effectives. On December 1st he felt compelled to abandon the Tallahatchie and fall back on Grenada, making the Yallabusha his line of defense. Grant, following up, made his headquarters at Oxford, and his cavalry advanced as far as Coffeeville, where they were defeated on December 5th by troops under command of Gen. Lloyd Tilghman; the Twenty-third Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. Moses McCarley; the Twenty-sixth, Maj. T. F. Parker; and the Fourteenth, Major Doss, being the principal Confederate forces engaged. In the
December 5th (search for this): chapter 7
ouragement. Plant your own foot upon our soil; unfurl your banner at the head of your army; tell your own people that you have come to share with them the perils of this dark hour, implored this anxious Mississippian. Pemberton reported on December 5th the advance of Grant on the Central railroad, the movement of Hovey and starting of Sherman down the Mississippi, adding that at the same time a demonstration was made from below on Port Hudson, La., within his department. He stated that Portelt compelled to abandon the Tallahatchie and fall back on Grenada, making the Yallabusha his line of defense. Grant, following up, made his headquarters at Oxford, and his cavalry advanced as far as Coffeeville, where they were defeated on December 5th by troops under command of Gen. Lloyd Tilghman; the Twenty-third Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. Moses McCarley; the Twenty-sixth, Maj. T. F. Parker; and the Fourteenth, Major Doss, being the principal Confederate forces engaged. In the meantime H
December 19th (search for this): chapter 7
and the forces made an ineffectual effort to check Van Dorn at Pontotoc. Early in December President Davis visited Chattanooga, where Johnston's headquarters were, and going on to Murfreesboro, consulted with General Bragg regarding the reinforcement of Vicksburg. On his return to Chattanooga he ordered General Johnston to detach 10,000 men under Gen. C. L. Stevenson to report at Vicksburg. The President and General Johnston then visited Mississippi together, and reaching Jackson on December 19th found the legislature in session, it having been called together by Governor Pettus to bring out the remaining militia resources of the State. Mr. Davis and General Johnston and staff next visited Vicksburg, where on December 21st and 22d they inspected its defenses. While there Generals Johnston and Smith agreed upon an estimate of the additional force needed for the defense of the department and Vicksburg, and on December 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclosing
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