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Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 7
3,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, and 800 artillerymen, was ordered by Bragg to make as strong a show as possible against Grant, to prevent rein mounted infantry. On September 2, 1862, Price was notified that Bragg was pursuing Buell toward Nashville, and that he should watch RosecThe latter feared that Price was about to move to Nashville to join Bragg, and made his dispositions accordingly. Price, indeed, received anton. Pemberton again called for reinforcements, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and Holmes send over 10,000 men from Arkansas. Bragg replied that he would order Forrest to make a diversion in West Tennessee, and Holmes positively refusedheadquarters were, and going on to Murfreesboro, consulted with General Bragg regarding the reinforcement of Vicksburg. On his return to Char the command of Maj.-Gen. Martin L. Smith, who was reinforced from Bragg's army by the Georgia brigade of Seth M. Barton, the Tennessee brig
Isaac N. Brown (search for this): chapter 7
the Thirty-seventh Alabama. When they reached the field, Colonel Martin led the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in person conducted the Thirtysev-enth and Thirty-eighth on the right. Martin pressed forward gallantly, pushing the enemy before him, and after the firing ceased made a charge with his two regiments, capturing several prisoners. In his report, Martin particularly noticed the bravery of Colonel Witherspoon of the Thirty-sixth, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, and Major Slaton. The men conducted themselves with the coolness and valor of veterans, though for the first time under fire. The Thirty-seventh, Col. Robert Mc-Lain, and Thirty-eighth, Col. F. W. Adams, were ordered to the front and under heavy fire, but on account of Little's death did not take an active part in the battle. The regimental loss in killed and wounded was, Thirty-sixth, 22; Thirty-seventh, 32; Thirty-eighth, 8; Fortieth, 49. Previous to the battle of Iuka the Mis
lerymen, was ordered by Bragg to make as strong a show as possible against Grant, to prevent reinforcements being sent to Buell. He could not attack the strong force of the enemy intrenched at Corinth, but he sent Armstrong with his cavalry into Wts and two companies of Mississippi mounted infantry. On September 2, 1862, Price was notified that Bragg was pursuing Buell toward Nashville, and that he should watch Rosecrans and prevent the junction of the latter with Buell. Word was receiveBuell. Word was received from Van Dorn that he would be ready to move from Holly Springs on the 12th to support the army of the West. Price immediately advanced his headquarters to Guntown, and having ascertained that Rosecrans was at Iuka with 10,000 men, he marched in ived an order to proceed to Nashville; but he believed that this was given under the impression that Rosecrans had joined Buell, and he resolved that as he had the enemy before him, he should continue to hold him. Accordingly he dispatched couriers
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 7
deral center, the fighting was terrific. Gates' brigade was first engaged in this vicinity, and Cabell was ordered up to his support, but Gates fell back for want of ammunition after gaining the enemy's works. Then Cabell went up with a yell of Butler, drove in the troops before the works and swept up to the cannons' mouths, but was then driven back under a withering fire. Rosecrans related that three assaults were made upon Robinette, and that the last, which he witnessed, was about as good n to Holly Springs and maybe Grenada, completing railroad and telegraph as I go. At the same time an expedition was prepared at Memphis to sail down the river against Vicksburg, of which Sherman was finally given command on Grant's insistence. Butler was expected to make a similar expedition up the river from New Orleans, and Curtis was instructed to send troops across the Mississippi against Grenada. The combination was a formidable one, and contemplated the concentration of about 100,000 m
W. L. Cabell (search for this): chapter 7
rigades—Gen. John C. Moore's, in which was the Thirty-fifth Mississippi, with Alabama, Arkansas and Texas comrades; Gen. W. L. Cabell's Arkansas brigade, and Gen. C. W. Phifer's Arkansas and Texas dismounted cavalry. The cavalry brigade of General ingo hotel and the buildings about the railroad depot, and a part of his brigade entered the innermost works. Phifer and Cabell penetrated as far, more to the left, driving the enemy from their guns. But the gallant Confederates were immediately metery Robinette, at the Federal center, the fighting was terrific. Gates' brigade was first engaged in this vicinity, and Cabell was ordered up to his support, but Gates fell back for want of ammunition after gaining the enemy's works. Then Cabell wCabell went up with a yell of Butler, drove in the troops before the works and swept up to the cannons' mouths, but was then driven back under a withering fire. Rosecrans related that three assaults were made upon Robinette, and that the last, which he witn
James A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 7
surpassed in valorous achievement, and many of them lost their lives or fell with severe wounds. Most notable among the dead was Col. John D. Martin, who fell mortally wounded while leading his brigade in a charge against an angle in the outer works. Colonel Leigh, of the Forty-third, was also killed, and Major McDonald, of the Fortieth. Among the wounded were Colonels Moore, of the Forty-third, and McLain, of the Thirty-seventh, Lieutenant-Colonels Terral, of the Seventh battalion, and Campbell, of the Fortieth, and Majors Keirn, of the Thirty-eighth, and Yates, of the Thirty-sixth. At four o'clock on the morning of the 4th, the Confederate batteries were in position and opened fire upon the town, and an attack was ordered at daylight; but there was a delay until nine o'clock, ascribed to the illness of General Hebert. Price's command swept forward, notwithstanding heavy loss in the face of the fire of the massed batteries of the enemy, took Battery Powell on the left and forc
Carruthers (search for this): chapter 7
Alabama, Arkansas and Kentucky regiments; the Second, under Gen. J. B. Villepigue, which included the Thirty-third and Thirty-ninth Mississippi; the Third, under Gen. John S. Bowen made up of the Sixth, Fifteenth and Twenty-second regiments and Carruthers' battalion, Mississippi infantry, and the First Missouri. Col. W. H. Jackson's cavalry brigade, attached to Lovell's command, consisted of the First Mississippi and Seventh Tennessee. Thirteen batteries were attached to the army, including the e, guarding the rear, Van Dorn was safely crossing the Hatchie at a bridge six miles south of Davis', and Bowen crossed the Tuscumbia, burning the bridge behind him and saving all the trains. In this very important contest on the Tuscumbia, Carruthers' battalion and the Fifteenth Mississippi and some companies of Jackson's cavalry carried off the honors. Among the Mississippi commands especially mentioned for gallantry at Corinth was the Twenty-second Mississippi, which, with the Ninth, led
W. B. Colbert (search for this): chapter 7
ederate force engaged. On the other hand Rosecrans reported that he had 9,000 on the road, but less than half that many were in the fight. The Federal total loss was reported at 790; the Confederate at 86 killed and 438 wounded. In this battle the Fortieth Mississippi, Col. W. B. Colbert, recently attached to Hebert's brigade, was distinguished in the attack upon the Federal battery, several pieces being drawn away by details from this command. General Price in his report stated, Colonel Colbert's regiment also proved its worthiness to take its place in this brave brigade, the command of which has by the fortunes of war been already devolved upon its intelligent and brave colonel. Col. John D. Martin's, the other brigade engaged, included the Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Mississippi infantry, and the Thirty-seventh Alabama. When they reached the field, Colonel Martin led the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in pers
Wallace Bruce Colbert (search for this): chapter 7
er hand Rosecrans reported that he had 9,000 on the road, but less than half that many were in the fight. The Federal total loss was reported at 790; the Confederate at 86 killed and 438 wounded. In this battle the Fortieth Mississippi, Col. W. B. Colbert, recently attached to Hebert's brigade, was distinguished in the attack upon the Federal battery, several pieces being drawn away by details from this command. General Price in his report stated, Colonel Colbert's regiment also proved itsst, and Van Dorn's command under Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. Price's corps included two divisions, Hebert's and Maury's. Hebert's division had four brigades, the First, under Col. Elijah Gates, mainly Missouri troops; the Second, under Col. W. Bruce Colbert, mainly Arkansas and Texas regiments, but including the Fortieth Mississippi; the Third, under Gen. M. E. Green, composed of the Seventh battalion and Forty-third regiment Mississippi infantry, and three Missouri regiments; the Fourth, un
Cottingham (search for this): chapter 7
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
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