hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 213 1 Browse Search
Sherman 156 4 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 144 0 Browse Search
Nathan B. Forrest 128 2 Browse Search
John C. Pemberton 126 2 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 113 9 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 98 0 Browse Search
W. W. Loring 95 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 91 3 Browse Search
Earl Van Dorn 86 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 821 total hits in 206 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
Robert Hall (search for this): chapter 7
day by Colonel Withers, but now by Col. Allen Thomas' Louisiana regiment. Thomas held his ground against at least a brigade and a battery of six guns until noon, when he retired, rapidly followed by the enemy, who was checked by a volley from Colonel Hall's Louisiana regiment in rifle-pits at the lake. The enemy also attacked Colonel Morrison at the mound in heavy force, and placed several batteries opposite to him which kept up a continuous fire. The advance of Steele on the levee had givee other side of the bayou and put him in with Morgan. By this arrangement he chose to attack at the apex of a triangle while Lee held the base and two sides, as the latter officer has pointed out. Early on the morning of the 29th, Lee withdrew Hall from the rifle-pits beyond the lake, leaving open to Sherman the approach which he had selected, through the abatis, the mucky shallow at the head of the bayou and the tangled marsh, to the dry ground on which Lee awaited him. Morgan advanced caut
he forces in the field. In the reorganization of the Confederate forces which followed, the Mississippi infantry in the army of the West was concentrated in a brigade of Maury's division, consisting of the Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, Fortieth, and Forty-third regiments and Seventh battalion. With the 1st of November General Grant began a movement on Grand Junction with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. If found practicable, he telegraphed Halleck, I will go on to Holly Springs and maybe Grenada, completing railroad and telegraph as I go. At the same time an expedition was prepared at Memphis to sail down the river against Vicksburg, of which Sherman was finally given command on Grant's insistence. Butler was expected to make a similar expedition up the river from New Orleans, and Curtis was instructed to send troops across the Mississippi against Grenada. The combination was a formidable one, and contemplated the concentration o
n the Jacinto road, where it took position to defend the cross-roads, where one branch turns off east toward the Fulton road from Iuka. The possession of the latter road by the Federals would have entirely cut off Price's communication with the south, while Ord was pushing forward on the north. But Price, apparently, was not aware of the seriousness of the situation. About four o'clock Sanborn's brigade of Hamilton's division came up and formed line of battle, and the fighting began. Hamilton soon called up Sullivan's brigade, and Martin's Mississippi brigade was brought into the fight from the other side of Iuka. The Federal advance was checked, and even at times driven back, with fierce and intrepid fighting on both sides. Price and Little, riding into the thickest of the fray, determined to order up the other two brigades of Little's division, as it was apparent that the Federal force was much the larger. In fact, in addition to Hamilton's division, Stanley's was close at
Louis Hebert (search for this): chapter 7
a minie ball which pierced his forehead. General Hebert then assumed the division command and keptenants to escape from his dangerous position. Hebert withdrew unmolested from the front of Rosecranppi, Col. W. B. Colbert, recently attached to Hebert's brigade, was distinguished in the attack upoled the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in person conductvell. Price's corps included two divisions, Hebert's and Maury's. Hebert's division had four brigHebert's division had four brigades, the First, under Col. Elijah Gates, mainly Missouri troops; the Second, under Col. W. Bruce Col nine o'clock, ascribed to the illness of General Hebert. Price's command swept forward, notwithstming force and were compelled to fall back. Hebert's division, under General Green, was also distwer. Nevertheless, they entered the town, and Hebert occupied the works on the ridge northwest of B fragments of brigades and regiments composing Hebert's division coming up feebly and supporting. W[4 more...]
the bridge behind him and saving all the trains. In this very important contest on the Tuscumbia, Carruthers' battalion and the Fifteenth Mississippi and some companies of Jackson's cavalry carried off the honors. Among the Mississippi commands especially mentioned for gallantry at Corinth was the Twenty-second Mississippi, which, with the Ninth, led in the first attack of Lovell's division. The Thirty-fifth fought nobly, and at Davis' bridge only forty men were left, commanded by Lieutenant Henry. General Villepigue mentioned for conspicuous gallantry Col. D. W. Hurst, Thirty-third, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns, and Col. W. B. Shelby, Thirty-ninth, who rallied his men at great personal risk from a temporary disorder. This unfortunate battle is graphically described in a letter written soon afterward by Capt. E. H. Cummins, of Maury's division, to General Beauregard. After noting that they occupied without great loss
B. R. Holmes (search for this): chapter 7
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
T. H. Holmes (search for this): chapter 7
Pemberton again called for reinforcements, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and Holmes send over 10,000 men from Arkansas. Bragg replied that he would order Forrest to make a diversion in West Tennessee, and Holmes positively refused to lend any assistance, on the ground that such a step would lose Arkansas to the Confederacy. Recognizing the gravity of the situation, the secretary of war on November 24th assigned Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to command oyond it which he might have gained in the meantime. Mr. Davis thereupon, while at Vicksburg, addressed a letter to Gen. T. H. Holmes, inclosing copies of Generals Johnston's and Smith's letters to himself, and after pressing upon him his own as welthe accompanying letters. * * * Whatever may be done should be done with all possible dispatch. On December 29th Gen. T. H. Holmes acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Davis' letter with inclosures, to Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the departmen
A. P. Hovey (search for this): chapter 7
ly Springs about two weeks later, repairing the railroad as he marched, and established his depot of supplies at the point he had now reached. About the same time Van Dorn's rear was threatened by a Federal expedition from Arkansas, under Gen. A. P. Hovey, consisting of 5,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry, which landed at Delta and Friar's Point and moved toward Charleston. Pemberton again called for reinforcements, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and e head of your army; tell your own people that you have come to share with them the perils of this dark hour, implored this anxious Mississippian. Pemberton reported on December 5th the advance of Grant on the Central railroad, the movement of Hovey and starting of Sherman down the Mississippi, adding that at the same time a demonstration was made from below on Port Hudson, La., within his department. He stated that Port Hudson was now held by about 5,500 men strongly intrenched; that Vick
ng to Van Dorn's official report he was on his way advancing north into Tennessee, driving back Hurlbut to Bolivar, Tenn., which was precisely what Grant sought to have him do. Grant had instructed HHurlbut to make a demonstration toward Grand Junction, near where Van Dorn lay with 10,000 men. Thereupon Grant massed his three divisions at hand against Price, Rosecrans marching from Jacinto wit ordered on October 1st to call in his outposts, increasing his force at Corinth to 23,000, and Hurlbut at Bolivar was instructed to watch Van Dorn, this order being followed on the 3d by orders to a continued on the 5th to Davis' bridge on the Hatchie, but the bridge was found in the hands of Hurlbut. Moore's brigade, now but 300 men, was thrown across, but the enemy was strongly posted and Moe same route by which we had approached, but found the passage of the Hatchie river disputed by Hurlbut's corps, 12,000 strong, which had marched across from Bolivar and reached Pocahontas before us.
D. W. Hurst (search for this): chapter 7
nt contest on the Tuscumbia, Carruthers' battalion and the Fifteenth Mississippi and some companies of Jackson's cavalry carried off the honors. Among the Mississippi commands especially mentioned for gallantry at Corinth was the Twenty-second Mississippi, which, with the Ninth, led in the first attack of Lovell's division. The Thirty-fifth fought nobly, and at Davis' bridge only forty men were left, commanded by Lieutenant Henry. General Villepigue mentioned for conspicuous gallantry Col. D. W. Hurst, Thirty-third, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns, and Col. W. B. Shelby, Thirty-ninth, who rallied his men at great personal risk from a temporary disorder. This unfortunate battle is graphically described in a letter written soon afterward by Capt. E. H. Cummins, of Maury's division, to General Beauregard. After noting that they occupied without great loss the rifle-pits, which were not obstinately defended, and then pushed on
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...