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nald, of the Fortieth. Among the wounded were Colonels Moore, of the Forty-third, and McLain, of the Thirty-seventh, Lieutenant-Colonels Terral, of the Seventh battalion, and Campbell, of the Fortieth, and Majors Keirn, of the Thirty-eighth, and Yates, of the Thirty-sixth. At four o'clock on the morning of the 4th, the Confederate batteries were in position and opened fire upon the town, and an attack was ordered at daylight; but there was a delay until nine o'clock, ascribed to the illness of obstructions, were not able to reach the intrenchments in a body. Col. W. H. Moore was mortally wounded while leading the Third brigade in a charge in the town, and Col. Robert McLain, commanding the Fourth brigade, was severely wounded. Major Yates, of the Thirty-sixth, was also among the wounded. In front of Battery Robinette, at the Federal center, the fighting was terrific. Gates' brigade was first engaged in this vicinity, and Cabell was ordered up to his support, but Gates fell
J. L. Wofford (search for this): chapter 7
h regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. Geeck by Col. W. T. Withers with the Seventeenth Louisiana, two companies of the Forty-sixth Mississippi, and a section of Wofford's battery, stationed between the bayou and lake. Early on the morning of the 27th, General Lee reported, the enemy appeime attempted to throw a pontoon bridge over the lake on his right, which was thwarted by a few well-directed shots from Wofford's battery and Lieutenant Tarleton's section of Ward's artillery. To meet the effort to pontoon, Lee pushed his line twoervices were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lie
W. W. Witherspoon (search for this): chapter 7
and Thirty-eighth Mississippi infantry, and the Thirty-seventh Alabama. When they reached the field, Colonel Martin led the first and last regiments in support of Hebert's left, while General Little in person conducted the Thirtysev-enth and Thirty-eighth on the right. Martin pressed forward gallantly, pushing the enemy before him, and after the firing ceased made a charge with his two regiments, capturing several prisoners. In his report, Martin particularly noticed the bravery of Colonel Witherspoon of the Thirty-sixth, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, and Major Slaton. The men conducted themselves with the coolness and valor of veterans, though for the first time under fire. The Thirty-seventh, Col. Robert Mc-Lain, and Thirty-eighth, Col. F. W. Adams, were ordered to the front and under heavy fire, but on account of Little's death did not take an active part in the battle. The regimental loss in killed and wounded was, Thirty-sixth, 22; Thirty-seventh, 32; Thirty-eighth, 8; Fortieth,
William T. Withers (search for this): chapter 7
len timber, and the defenses at Snyder's not likely to be assailed, he stationed the First Louisiana and two guns at the mound, or sandbar, four regiments and a battery at the head of Chickasaw Bayou, and a regiment between the mound and the bayou. Rifle-pits were hurriedly thrown up at the mound and the bayou, and across the lake timber was felled for an abatis. On the 26th the fighting began with Morgan's advance on the west side of the bayou, which was gallantly held in check by Col. W. T. Withers with the Seventeenth Louisiana, two companies of the Forty-sixth Mississippi, and a section of Wofford's battery, stationed between the bayou and lake. Early on the morning of the 27th, General Lee reported, the enemy appeared in force and attacked Colonel Withers with violence. The colonel retired for a short distance up the bayou to a piece of woods, and held his ground against a largely superior force. The enemy also appeared in force in the woods in front of the Indian mound, dr
W. T. Withers (search for this): chapter 7
General Lee reported, the enemy appeared in force and attacked Colonel Withers with violence. The colonel retired for a short distance up thh, the enemy again attacked the woods held the previous day by Colonel Withers, but now by Col. Allen Thomas' Louisiana regiment. Thomas helad increased his force there on the night of the 27th, placing Colonel Withers, First Mississippi artillery, in charge, with the Forty-sixth artillery, but was handsomely held in check and driven back by Colonel Withers' command, the Forty-sixth Mississippi and two Napoleon guns unampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguishedee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B.
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
S. M. Ward (search for this): chapter 7
ourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given charge of the line of defenses from Vicksburg to Snyder's Mill on Christmas day, and he at once made skillful arrangements for meeting the enemy. Judging the approausly and took possession of the abandoned rifle-pits, and at the same time attempted to throw a pontoon bridge over the lake on his right, which was thwarted by a few well-directed shots from Wofford's battery and Lieutenant Tarleton's section of Ward's artillery. To meet the effort to pontoon, Lee pushed his line two regiments to the left and called Colonel Layton's Fourth Mississippi from Snyder's Mill. Morgan protested against the proposed assault, but Sherman was determined that it shou
Davis Visits (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Campaigns of Price and Van Dorn battle of Iuka Mississippi commands in Van Dorn's army battle of Corinth Hatchie bridge Grant's campaign on the Central railroad invasion from Arkansas Forrest in West Tennessee Van Dorn at Holly Springs President Davis Visits Mississippi Sherman defeated at Chickasaw Bayou. We will now turn to the field in Northeast Mississippi, where General Price, at Tupelo, confronted Grant and Rosecrans at Corinth. On July 27-29th, Lee, a Kansas colonel, with 400 cavalry, made a raid from Rienzi to Ripley, captured three Confederates and arrested Judge Thompson and the postmaster. August 4-7th Mitchell's Federal brigade made an excursion to Bay Springs and returned to Iuka after doing some damage and encountering a little skirmishing with the Confederate parties observing them. On August 19th, Colonel Adams, in camp with two companies of Mississippi cavalry at Marietta, was attacked by Colonel Lee, and made a safe retreat to
John B. Villepigue (search for this): chapter 7
vision had three infantry Brigades—Gen. John C. Moore's, in which was the Thirty-fifth Mississippi, with Alabama, Arkansas and Texas comrades; Gen. W. L. Cabell's Arkansas brigade, and Gen. C. W. Phifer's Arkansas and Texas dismounted cavalry. The cavalry brigade of General Armstrong included the two regiments of Slemons and Wirt Adams. Lovell's division included three infantry brigades—the First, under Gen. Albert Rust, Alabama, Arkansas and Kentucky regiments; the Second, under Gen. J. B. Villepigue, which included the Thirty-third and Thirty-ninth Mississippi; the Third, under Gen. John S. Bowen made up of the Sixth, Fifteenth and Twenty-second regiments and Carruthers' battalion, Mississippi infantry, and the First Missouri. Col. W. H. Jackson's cavalry brigade, attached to Lovell's command, consisted of the First Mississippi and Seventh Tennessee. Thirteen batteries were attached to the army, including the Pettus Flying artillery. Grant had now made his headquarters at Jac
J. B. Villepigue (search for this): chapter 7
t upon the Federal rifle-pits, afterward carried a strong redoubt, and by the close of the day was in line on the bridge south of the railroad, near Price, with Villepigue and Bowen in front and Rust in reserve. Thus, night coming on, the victorious army slept upon their arms within six hundred yards of Corinth. In this succes, but the enemy was strongly posted and Moore, reinforced by Phifer, was swept back over the bridge, losing four guns. All that Maury's division, reinforced by Villepigue, could do, was to check the enemy's advance until Van Dorn could find another crossing place. If Rosecrans had promptly followed Van Dorn, as ordered by Grant, led in the first attack of Lovell's division. The Thirty-fifth fought nobly, and at Davis' bridge only forty men were left, commanded by Lieutenant Henry. General Villepigue mentioned for conspicuous gallantry Col. D. W. Hurst, Thirty-third, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns
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