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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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E. H. Cummins (search for this): chapter 7
sion. The Thirty-fifth fought nobly, and at Davis' bridge only forty men were left, commanded by Lieutenant Henry. General Villepigue mentioned for conspicuous gallantry Col. D. W. Hurst, Thirty-third, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns, and Col. W. B. Shelby, Thirty-ninth, who rallied his men at great personal risk from a temporary disorder. This unfortunate battle is graphically described in a letter written soon afterward by Capt. E. H. Cummins, of Maury's division, to General Beauregard. After noting that they occupied without great loss the rifle-pits, which were not obstinately defended, and then pushed on to the inner line of works constructed by the Yankees near the intersection of the railroads, he relates that during the night a great rattling of wagons and shouting of teamsters were heard, which he and others took to mean that Rosecrans was evacuating. But in the morning they found themselves in an exposed position
er General Grant began a movement on Grand Junction with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. If found practicable, he telegraphed Halleck, I will go on to Holly Springs and maybe Grenada, completing railroad and telegraph as I go. At the same time an expedition was prepared at Memphis to sail down the river against Vicksburg, of which Sherman was finally given command on Grant's insistence. Butler was expected to make a similar expedition up the river from New Orleans, and Curtis was instructed to send troops across the Mississippi against Grenada. The combination was a formidable one, and contemplated the concentration of about 100,000 men for the purpose of capturing Vicksburg, and in fact securing possession of the whole of northern Mississippi. Pemberton had a very small force to oppose this gigantic combination, and he made urgent calls for reinforcements as early as October, when it became apparent what was on foot. Grant was at La Grange, Tenn., Novembe
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 7
ight. The retreat was continued on the 5th to Davis' bridge on the Hatchie, but the bridge was fouing the Hatchie at a bridge six miles south of Davis', and Bowen crossed the Tuscumbia, burning thevision. The Thirty-fifth fought nobly, and at Davis' bridge only forty men were left, commanded by, at least, at this juncture suggested to President Davis that he give the State his own presence aan Dorn at Pontotoc. Early in December President Davis visited Chattanooga, where Johnston's heae remaining militia resources of the State. Mr. Davis and General Johnston and staff next visited r 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclosing General Smith's letter (of estimatwhich he might have gained in the meantime. Mr. Davis thereupon, while at Vicksburg, addressed a len. T. H. Holmes acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Davis' letter with inclosures, to Gen. Joseph E. Jy of the Arkansas. Returning to Jackson, Mr. Davis and General Johnston, December 26th, address
De Courcy (search for this): chapter 7
and Lieutenant Tarleton's section of Ward's artillery. To meet the effort to pontoon, Lee pushed his line two regiments to the left and called Colonel Layton's Fourth Mississippi from Snyder's Mill. Morgan protested against the proposed assault, but Sherman was determined that it should be made, and it is related that he said that 5,000 men would be lost before Vicksburg could be taken, and they might as well be lost there as anywhere. So Morgan sent forward the brigades of Blair and De Courcy and Thayer. Only one regiment of the latter took part in the assault, leaving nine Federal regiments engaged. After 10 a. m., Lee reported, a furious cannonade was opened on my position by the enemy, he at the same time arranging his infantry to storm my position. At 11 a. m. his artillery fire ceased and his infantry, 6,000 strong, moved gallantly up under our artillery fire from eight guns, crossing the lake at two dry points, one being in front of the vacated pits and the other abo
ss to be 400 or 500. Rosecrans exuberantly reported that he had defeated an army of 38,000 men with little more than half their numbers; inflicting a loss of 1,423 killed (left upon the field and buried by him), and 5,692 wounded, according to his estimate; and that he had taken 2,268 prisoners, among whom were 137 field officers, captains and subalterns, 14 stand of colors, 2 pieces of artillery, 3,300 stand of small arms, 45,000 rounds of ammunition and a large lot of accouterments. Van Dom retreated to Holly Springs but little disturbed by the pursuit of Rosecrans, who, when he had reached Ripley, was ordered back by Grant, who ordered an expedition to cover his return which went seven miles south of Grand Junction and destroyed the railroad bridge at Davis' Mills. On October 1st, Lieut.-Gen. John C. Pemberton had been assigned to the command of the department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and he assumed his duties October 12th, Van Dorn remaining in command of the f
Earl Van Dorn (search for this): chapter 7
he latter with Buell. Word was received from Van Dorn that he would be ready to move from Holly Sprmonstration toward Grand Junction, near where Van Dorn lay with 10,000 men. Thereupon Grant masseion on finding out, so late as the 30th, that Van Dorn had left La Grange, Tenn.; the Confederate cand Hurlbut at Bolivar was instructed to watch Van Dorn, this order being followed on the 3d by orderld do, was to check the enemy's advance until Van Dorn could find another crossing place. If Rosecred. On the 9th General Pemberton had ordered Van Dorn and Price and Lovell back to the south bank ont he had now reached. About the same time Van Dorn's rear was threatened by a Federal expeditionton remaining in command in Mississippi, with Van Dorn in command of the army of West Tennessee, whiction and La Grange. On December 20th, General Van Dorn, in command of the cavalry of Pemberton'she forces made an ineffectual effort to check Van Dorn at Pontotoc. Early in December President D[15 more...]
Washington L. Doss (search for this): chapter 7
uding cavalry and artillery, about 22,000 effectives. On December 1st he felt compelled to abandon the Tallahatchie and fall back on Grenada, making the Yallabusha his line of defense. Grant, following up, made his headquarters at Oxford, and his cavalry advanced as far as Coffeeville, where they were defeated on December 5th by troops under command of Gen. Lloyd Tilghman; the Twenty-third Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. Moses McCarley; the Twenty-sixth, Maj. T. F. Parker; and the Fourteenth, Major Doss, being the principal Confederate forces engaged. In the meantime Hovey was taken care of by Colonel Starke's cavalry and the various outposts, and after skirmishes at the mouth of the Coldwater on the Yockhapatalfa, at Mitchell's Cross-roads and Oakland, he retreated to the Mississippi river, having done little damage except burning some bridges and sinking the steamer New Moon on the Tallahatchie. Grant waited at Oxford for Sherman to make his way down the river, but the latter did no
N. J. Drew (search for this): chapter 7
cuous in the operations of the army of Northern Virginia as a colonel of artillery, was put in command of a provisional division which included a number of regiments and battalions and artillery, among which were the Third Mississippi, Third battalion State troops, Fourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given charge of the line of defenses from Vicksburg to Snyder's Mill on Christmas day, and he at once made skillful arrangements for meeting the enemy. Judging the approaches nearest Vicksburg sufficiently protected by abatis of fallen timber, and the defenses at Snyder's not likely to be assailed, he stationed the First Louisiana and two guns at the mound, or sandbar, four regiments and a battery at
James H. Duncan (search for this): chapter 7
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
W. K. Easterling (search for this): chapter 7
Gregg, and the Alabama brigade of E. D. Tracy. Brig.-Gen. Stephen D. Lee, a distinguished soldier who had been conspicuous in the operations of the army of Northern Virginia as a colonel of artillery, was put in command of a provisional division which included a number of regiments and battalions and artillery, among which were the Third Mississippi, Third battalion State troops, Fourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batteries of Capt. Robert Bowman, Capt. J. L. Wofford, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Capt. N. J. Drew, Maj. S. M. Ward's light artillery, and Johnston's cavalry company. General Lee was given charge of the line of defenses from Vicksburg to Snyder's Mill on Christmas day, and he at once made skillful arrangements for meeting the enemy. Judging the approaches nearest Vicksburg sufficiently protected by abatis of fallen timber, and the defenses at Snyder's not likely t
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