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W. C. Falkner (search for this): chapter 7
ion to Bay Springs and returned to Iuka after doing some damage and encountering a little skirmishing with the Confederate parties observing them. On August 19th, Colonel Adams, in camp with two companies of Mississippi cavalry at Marietta, was attacked by Colonel Lee, and made a safe retreat toward the headquarters of Armstrong near Guntown. Lee reported that the posting and vigilance of the Confederate pickets were perfect, and it was impracticable to capture them. On August 27th Colonel Falkner tried his hand at this game and drove in Sheridan's pickets on the Ripley road. General Price, who had now an army of 13,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, and 800 artillerymen, was ordered by Bragg to make as strong a show as possible against Grant, to prevent reinforcements being sent to Buell. He could not attack the strong force of the enemy intrenched at Corinth, but he sent Armstrong with his cavalry into West Tennessee. With 1,600 men he reached Holly Springs, August 26th, and wa
Nathan B. Forrest (search for this): chapter 7
orn battle of Iuka Mississippi commands in Van Dorn's army battle of Corinth Hatchie bridge Grant's campaign on the Central railroad invasion from Arkansas Forrest in West Tennessee Van Dorn at Holly Springs President Davis Visits Mississippi Sherman defeated at Chickasaw Bayou. We will now turn to the field in Northeaents, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and Holmes send over 10,000 men from Arkansas. Bragg replied that he would order Forrest to make a diversion in West Tennessee, and Holmes positively refused to lend any assistance, on the ground that such a step would lose Arkansas to the Confederacyh Friar's Point with his advance until December 21st, and meanwhile a great change in the situation had been wrought by the Confederate cavalry. On the 19th Nathan B. Forrest, then a brigadier-general, a brilliant soldier in whose exploits Mississippi felt a motherly pride, as his youth had been spent in this State, drove the stro
Elijah Gates (search for this): chapter 7
Price's corps included two divisions, Hebert's and Maury's. Hebert's division had four brigades, the First, under Col. Elijah Gates, mainly Missouri troops; the Second, under Col. W. Bruce Colbert, mainly Arkansas and Texas regiments, but includinile masked batteries of the enemy opened upon the brave boys at every stage of the advance. The First brigade, under Colonel Gates, drove the enemy from their intrenchments, taking about forty pieces of artillery. The Fourth and Second brigades, oy-sixth, was also among the wounded. In front of Battery Robinette, at the Federal center, the fighting was terrific. Gates' brigade was first engaged in this vicinity, and Cabell was ordered up to his support, but Gates fell back for want of amGates fell back for want of ammunition after gaining the enemy's works. Then Cabell went up with a yell of Butler, drove in the troops before the works and swept up to the cannons' mouths, but was then driven back under a withering fire. Rosecrans related that three assaults w
James Z. George (search for this): chapter 7
orcements as early as October, when it became apparent what was on foot. Grant was at La Grange, Tenn., November 9th, and a cavalry reconnoissance sent on toward Holly Springs discovered that that place had been evacuated. On the 9th General Pemberton had ordered Van Dorn and Price and Lovell back to the south bank of the Tallahatchie, where fortifications were begun. Price was posted between Abbeville and the Tallahatchie bridge, Lovell near the ford at the mouth of the Tippah, and General George with his State troops put on guard at Oxford. Grant brought his army up to Holly Springs about two weeks later, repairing the railroad as he marched, and established his depot of supplies at the point he had now reached. About the same time Van Dorn's rear was threatened by a Federal expedition from Arkansas, under Gen. A. P. Hovey, consisting of 5,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry, which landed at Delta and Friar's Point and moved toward Charleston. Pemberton again called for reinforc
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 7
pi, where General Price, at Tupelo, confronted Grant and Rosecrans at Corinth. On July 27-29th, unt of stores. Rosecrans was at Corinth and Grant at Burnsville. The latter feared that Price w. In his report of the battle which followed, Grant candidly stated that his object was to destroyfeint toward Pocahontas, threatening Bolivar. Grant reported on October 1st, For several days ther had promptly followed Van Dorn, as ordered by Grant, the Confederate army could hardly have escapehen he had reached Ripley, was ordered back by Grant, who ordered an expedition to cover his returnnth battalion. With the 1st of November General Grant began a movement on Grand Junction with thwith his State troops put on guard at Oxford. Grant brought his army up to Holly Springs about twosuggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and Holmes send over 10,000 he estimated at a million and a half dollars. Grant reported the loss at $400,000 in property and [14 more...]
M. E. Green (search for this): chapter 7
attery Powell on the left and forced their way into the town. Moore's brigade, after capturing a battery of light artillery, took possession of the Tishomingo hotel and the buildings about the railroad depot, and a part of his brigade entered the innermost works. Phifer and Cabell penetrated as far, more to the left, driving the enemy from their guns. But the gallant Confederates were immediately met by an overwhelming force and were compelled to fall back. Hebert's division, under General Green, was also distinguished, charging in the face of two lines of fortifications, bristling with artillery, making its way with great rapidity over logs, brush and fallen timber, while masked batteries of the enemy opened upon the brave boys at every stage of the advance. The First brigade, under Colonel Gates, drove the enemy from their intrenchments, taking about forty pieces of artillery. The Fourth and Second brigades, on account of obstructions, were not able to reach the intrenchment
Martin E. Green (search for this): chapter 7
m the war department. This united army, which was styled the army of West Tennessee, was composed of Price's corps, the army of the West, and Van Dorn's command under Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. Price's corps included two divisions, Hebert's and Maury's. Hebert's division had four brigades, the First, under Col. Elijah Gates, mainly Missouri troops; the Second, under Col. W. Bruce Colbert, mainly Arkansas and Texas regiments, but including the Fortieth Mississippi; the Third, under Gen. M. E. Green, composed of the Seventh battalion and Forty-third regiment Mississippi infantry, and three Missouri regiments; the Fourth, under Col. John D. Martin, made up of the Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Mississippi and Thirty-seventh Alabama. Maury's division had three infantry Brigades—Gen. John C. Moore's, in which was the Thirty-fifth Mississippi, with Alabama, Arkansas and Texas comrades; Gen. W. L. Cabell's Arkansas brigade, and Gen. C. W. Phifer's Arkansas and Texas dis
John Gregg (search for this): chapter 7
back from the Yazoo to the foot of the hills, but found that in order to reach the hard land he would have to cross a long corduroy causeway with a battery enfilading it, others cross-firing it, with a similar line of rifle-pits and trenches before described. The Confederate forces in Vicksburg at this time were still under the command of Maj.-Gen. Martin L. Smith, who was reinforced from Bragg's army by the Georgia brigade of Seth M. Barton, the Tennessee brigades of John C. Vaughn and John Gregg, and the Alabama brigade of E. D. Tracy. Brig.-Gen. Stephen D. Lee, a distinguished soldier who had been conspicuous in the operations of the army of Northern Virginia as a colonel of artillery, was put in command of a provisional division which included a number of regiments and battalions and artillery, among which were the Third Mississippi, Third battalion State troops, Fourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W.
. With 1,600 men he reached Holly Springs, August 26th, and was reinforced by 1,100 under Col. W. H. Jackson. At Bolivar Armstrong defeated a force, then crossed the Hatchie, destroyed the railroad bridges between Jackson and Bolivar, and on the return defeated a considerable Federal force near Denmark, capturing two pieces of artillery and 213 prisoners. This blow was returned by an expedition from Memphis which burned the railroad bridge across the Coldwater, after a brisk fight between Grierson's cavalry regiment and a portion of Jackson's and Pinson's regiments and two companies of Mississippi mounted infantry. On September 2, 1862, Price was notified that Bragg was pursuing Buell toward Nashville, and that he should watch Rosecrans and prevent the junction of the latter with Buell. Word was received from Van Dorn that he would be ready to move from Holly Springs on the 12th to support the army of the West. Price immediately advanced his headquarters to Guntown, and having a
their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vicksburg, Withers' five batteries of light artillery were particularly distinguished. A part of the battalion, as has been observed, supported by the Forty-sixth Mississippi, alone held in check Steele's division at Blake's Levee. In the fight of the 29th their services were invaluable. Colonel Withers in his report particularly commended the gallantry of Maj. B. R. Holmes, Capt. J. L. Wofford (who fired the first gun at the enemy), Lieutenants Lockhart and Weems, Lieut. Frank Johnston, Captain Bowman, Lieutenant Tye , Lieutenant Duncan and Lieutenants Cottingham and Guest
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