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enson arrived and took command of the forces. On the 30th the attack was renewed on Barton, but not with much vigor, and the 31st was given to the burial of their dead by the Federals. Sherman gave up hope of breaking the Confederate line in the place where he was now bottled, and arranged with Admiral Porter for a night movement by water to Snyder's Mill, where 10,000 men should be landed while Porter held the batteries down. But the last night of 1862 was too foggy and the first night of 1863 was too bright; and on the next day the whole Federal army was embarked to leave their swampy covert for Milliken's Bend. As Sherman was embarking Lee and Withers advanced and attacked him, following the Federals up to the Yazoo river. The Second Texas rushed up almost to the boats, delivering their fire with terrible effect on the crowded transports, which moved off most precipitately. This little affair was not reported by Sherman. In this successful repulse of the second attack on Vi
August 26th (search for this): chapter 7
27th Colonel Falkner tried his hand at this game and drove in Sheridan's pickets on the Ripley road. General Price, who had now an army of 13,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, and 800 artillerymen, was ordered by Bragg to make as strong a show as possible against Grant, to prevent reinforcements being sent to Buell. He could not attack the strong force of the enemy intrenched at Corinth, but he sent Armstrong with his cavalry into West Tennessee. With 1,600 men he reached Holly Springs, August 26th, and was reinforced by 1,100 under Col. W. H. Jackson. At Bolivar Armstrong defeated a force, then crossed the Hatchie, destroyed the railroad bridges between Jackson and Bolivar, and on the return defeated a considerable Federal force near Denmark, capturing two pieces of artillery and 213 prisoners. This blow was returned by an expedition from Memphis which burned the railroad bridge across the Coldwater, after a brisk fight between Grierson's cavalry regiment and a portion of Jackson'
December 22nd (search for this): chapter 7
cember 19th found the legislature in session, it having been called together by Governor Pettus to bring out the remaining militia resources of the State. Mr. Davis and General Johnston and staff next visited Vicksburg, where on December 21st and 22d they inspected its defenses. While there Generals Johnston and Smith agreed upon an estimate of the additional force needed for the defense of the department and Vicksburg, and on December 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclDecember 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclosing General Smith's letter (of estimates) to him. In this letter among other things, General Johnston said, Our great object is to hold the Mississippi. The country beyond the Mississippi is as much interested in that object as this, and the loss to us of the Mississippi involves that of the country beyond it. The 8,000 or 10,000 men which are essential to safety ought therefore, I respectfully suggest, to be taken from Arkansas, to return after the crisis in this department. I firmly be
December 21st (search for this): chapter 7
having done little damage except burning some bridges and sinking the steamer New Moon on the Tallahatchie. Grant waited at Oxford for Sherman to make his way down the river, but the latter did not reach Friar's Point with his advance until December 21st, and meanwhile a great change in the situation had been wrought by the Confederate cavalry. On the 19th Nathan B. Forrest, then a brigadier-general, a brilliant soldier in whose exploits Mississippi felt a motherly pride, as his youth had beJackson on December 19th found the legislature in session, it having been called together by Governor Pettus to bring out the remaining militia resources of the State. Mr. Davis and General Johnston and staff next visited Vicksburg, where on December 21st and 22d they inspected its defenses. While there Generals Johnston and Smith agreed upon an estimate of the additional force needed for the defense of the department and Vicksburg, and on December 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to M
December 20th (search for this): chapter 7
1st, and meanwhile a great change in the situation had been wrought by the Confederate cavalry. On the 19th Nathan B. Forrest, then a brigadier-general, a brilliant soldier in whose exploits Mississippi felt a motherly pride, as his youth had been spent in this State, drove the strong Federal garrison from Jackson, Tenn., and then made a clean sweep of the enemy and their stores and the railroads north of Jackson, drawing 20,000 Federals from Corinth, Grand Junction and La Grange. On December 20th, General Van Dorn, in command of the cavalry of Pemberton's army, advanced by way of Pontotoc, and struck an equally effective blow at Holly Springs, surprising the garrison and burning up all the supplies and trains collected at that place, the value of which he estimated at a million and a half dollars. Grant reported the loss at $400,000 in property and 1,500 men taken prisoners. He at once fell back to Holly Springs and occupied the line of the Tallahatchie, abandoning the plan of
December 19th (search for this): chapter 7
and the forces made an ineffectual effort to check Van Dorn at Pontotoc. Early in December President Davis visited Chattanooga, where Johnston's headquarters were, and going on to Murfreesboro, consulted with General Bragg regarding the reinforcement of Vicksburg. On his return to Chattanooga he ordered General Johnston to detach 10,000 men under Gen. C. L. Stevenson to report at Vicksburg. The President and General Johnston then visited Mississippi together, and reaching Jackson on December 19th found the legislature in session, it having been called together by Governor Pettus to bring out the remaining militia resources of the State. Mr. Davis and General Johnston and staff next visited Vicksburg, where on December 21st and 22d they inspected its defenses. While there Generals Johnston and Smith agreed upon an estimate of the additional force needed for the defense of the department and Vicksburg, and on December 22d General Johnston addressed a letter to Mr. Davis inclosing
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