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Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
id not again see General Hill's body, which was brought to Venable's by a route still further to our rear, having, with the staff and couriers of the Third corps, been ordered to General Longstreet, who soon became very actively engaged. I learned that the ball struck the General's pistol hand and then penetrated his body just over the heart. Captain Frank Hill, aidede-camp (and nephew) to the General, in charge, and Courier Jenkins were of the party detailed to escort the body, with Mrs. Hill and her children, to a Mr. Hill's, near the banks of James river, in Chesterfield county, where the General's body was temporarily buried and afterwards removed to Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Thus closed the career of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, of whom Swinton, in his excellent book, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, says: Who, in all the operations that from first to last filled up the four years defense of the Confederate capital, had borne a most distinguished part.
Cox (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
must rally the men on the right. This was the first information received at corps headquarters that our right had given way. General Hill then rode, attended only by Jenkins, to the front gate of General Lee's headquarters (Turnbull House, on the Cox road, nearly one and a half miles westerly from General Hill's), where I met them. We went directly across the road into the opposite field, and riding due south a short distance the General drew rein, and for a few moments used his field-glassf the Appomattox. Meanwhile, meeting Colonels Palmer and Wingate and others of General Hill's staff and couriers, and halting a moment to answer the kindly expressed inquiries of General Longstreet, we rode on and found General Lee mounted at the Cox road in front of army headquarters. I reported to him General Hill's last order to me. General Lee then asked for details, receiving which and expressing his sorrow he directed me to accompany Colonel Palmer to Mrs. Hill. General Lee said: Colone
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
Fort Gregg, where the General halted a considerable time. He passed only a few words with his staff party or those very, very few in the trenches there. He seemed lost in contemplation of the immediate position, at which the Confederate line had become so terribly stretched that it broke that very night, letting in a deluge of the enemy, who, only partly checked by the wonderful defense of Fort Gregg, next morning flooded the country. We then returned to corps headquarters, which were at Indiana, on an extension of Washington street, Petersburg, and immediately adjoining The Model Farm, on the east. General Hill retired to Venable's cottage, just across the road and within fifty yards of his camp, having had there, during the winter, his wife and two young children. About midnight the cannonading in front of Petersburg, which had begun at nightfall, became very heavy, increasing as the hours went by. Colonel Palmer, Chief of Staff, woke Major Starke, Acting Adjutant General, a
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 101
rated his body just over the heart. Captain Frank Hill, aidede-camp (and nephew) to the General, in charge, and Courier Jenkins were of the party detailed to escort the body, with Mrs. Hill and her children, to a Mr. Hill's, near the banks of James river, in Chesterfield county, where the General's body was temporarily buried and afterwards removed to Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Thus closed the career of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, of whom Swinton, in his excellent book, Campl and her children, to a Mr. Hill's, near the banks of James river, in Chesterfield county, where the General's body was temporarily buried and afterwards removed to Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Thus closed the career of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, of whom Swinton, in his excellent book, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, says: Who, in all the operations that from first to last filled up the four years defense of the Confederate capital, had borne a most distinguished part.
go up this side of the branch to the woods, which will cover us until reaching the field in rear of General Heth's quarters, I hope to find the road clear at General Heth's. From that time on I kept slightly ahead of the General. I had kept a Colt's army pistol drawn since the affair of the Federal stragglers. We then made the branch, becoming obscured from the enemy, and crossing the Bowdtoin (not Boydtown, as some writers have called it) plank road, soon made the woods, which were kept f ran quickly forward to the cover of one of the large trees, and, one above the other on the same side, leveled their guns. I looked around to General Hill. He said: We must take them, at the same time drawing, for the first time that day, his Colt's navy pistol. I said: Stay there, I'll take them. By this time we were within twenty yards of the two behind the tree and getting closer every moment. I shouted: If you fire, you'll be swept to hell! Our men are here — surrender! When Genera
G. W. Tucker (search for this): chapter 101
Death of General A. P. Hill. By G. W. Tucker, formerly General A. P. Hill's Sergeant of Couriers. [The Confederacy had no more gallant soldier, no more devoted patriot, no more self-sacrificing servant than the accomplished gentleman who yielded up his noble life on that last sad day at Petersburg, We are glad to be able to lay before our readers and put on record the story of his death, as told in the interesting narrative of Sergeant Tucker. It will be seen that General Hill, with a sick furlough in his pocket, returned to duty as soon as he learned that his grand old corps, which he had led so ably and successfully during the last campaign, wasim to wake up the staff, get everything in readiness and have the headquarters' wagons hitched up. He added that he was going to General Lee's, and would take Sergeant Tucker and two couriers, and that as soon as he could have an interview with General Lee, he would return. General Hill then rode to the couriers' quarters and fo
ely adjoining The Model Farm, on the east. General Hill retired to Venable's cottage, just across tfront of the city. This he communicated to General Hill at Venable's. Before sunrise General Hilal Lee's together, only a few minutes after General Hill, who at once directed Kirkpatrick to ride r The enemy's. Proceeding still further and General Hill making no further remark, I became so impreg through the woods, the only words between General Hill and myself, except a few relating to the roo the branch, along the north side of which General Hill had so shortly ridden in his most earnest ent of army headquarters. I reported to him General Hill's last order to me. General Lee then asked e directed me to accompany Colonel Palmer to Mrs. Hill. General Lee said: Colonel, break the news tstantly fled. The writer did not again see General Hill's body, which was brought to Venable's by ainia. Thus closed the career of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, of whom Swinton, in his excellent[13 more...]
ire in the open. Emerging thence down hill to the branch, along the north side of which General Hill had so shortly ridden in his most earnest endeavor to reach our separated and shattered right, and in a straight line for General Lee's headquarters, I came in sight of a mounted party of our own people, who, when the branch was crossed and the hill risen, proved to be Lieutenant-General Longstreet and staff, just arrived from north of the Appomattox. Meanwhile, meeting Colonels Palmer and Wingate and others of General Hill's staff and couriers, and halting a moment to answer the kindly expressed inquiries of General Longstreet, we rode on and found General Lee mounted at the Cox road in front of army headquarters. I reported to him General Hill's last order to me. General Lee then asked for details, receiving which and expressing his sorrow he directed me to accompany Colonel Palmer to Mrs. Hill. General Lee said: Colonel, break the news to her as gently as possible. The Fifth A
arted back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General's side, and my attention having now been aroused and looking carefully ahead and around I saw a lot of people in and about the old log hut winter quarters of General Mahone's division, situated to the right of Whitworth House and on top of the hill beyond the branch we were approaching. Now as I knew that those quarters had been vacant since about March 15th by the transfer of Mahone to north of the Appomattox,Mahone to north of the Appomattox, and feeling that it was the enemy's troops in possession, with nothing looking like a Confederate anywhere, I remarked, pointing to the old camp: General, what troops are those? He quickly replied: The enemy's. Proceeding still further and General Hill making no further remark, I became so impressed with the great risk he was running that I made bold to say: Please excuse me, General, but where are you going? He answered: Sergeant, I must go to the right as quickly as possible. Then, pointi
Kirkpatrick (search for this): chapter 101
dquarters. He then rode off rapidly. It was our custom, in critical times, to have, during the night, two of the couriers' horses always saddled. I called to Kirkpatrick and Jenkins, the couriers next in turn, to follow the General as quickly as possible. I saddled up at once and followed them. Kirkpatrick and Jenkins arrived Kirkpatrick and Jenkins arrived at General Lee's together, only a few minutes after General Hill, who at once directed Kirkpatrick to ride rapidly back to our quarters (I met him on the road, going at full speed) and tell Colonel Palmer to follow him to the right, and the others of the staff, and couriers, must rally the men on the right. This was the first infoKirkpatrick to ride rapidly back to our quarters (I met him on the road, going at full speed) and tell Colonel Palmer to follow him to the right, and the others of the staff, and couriers, must rally the men on the right. This was the first information received at corps headquarters that our right had given way. General Hill then rode, attended only by Jenkins, to the front gate of General Lee's headquarters (Turnbull House, on the Cox road, nearly one and a half miles westerly from General Hill's), where I met them. We went directly across the road into the opposite f
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