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Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, &c. He said that as soon as he returned to his office, he would order the section to its original command. On the 19th of October the order came, and the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old commSelma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of October, it was ordered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on th
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
October the order came, and the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of October, it was ordered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on the 5th of November, the whole division marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. by Captain William L. Ritter. Paper no. 4. Thursday evening July 16th, 1863, the Confederate works at Jackson, Mississippi, were abandoned, Lieutenant Ritter's section being the last to leave them. Next day, the 17th, Brandon was reached, and on the 20th Morton. Here the section was paid off, after considerable insistance, not having received any money for a number of months. On the 24th of August the battery was attached to Preston's battalion of reserve artillery, and on the 5th of September, ordered to Demopolis, Alabama, for repairs. In new uniforms, well dressed, well drilled, and well equipped, on the 12th of October the battery took part in a review had for General Johnston, and was chosen to fire a salute of eleven guns in his honor; as also one afterwards on the 15th, in honor of the arrival of President Davis. At this place an effort was made to consolidate Moore's and Ritter's sections, but it failed, as the se
Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, this was a delightful change. On the 20th of January, 1864, the whole battalion, for easier access to long forage, was ordered to Kingston, where it again built winter quarters. Between the 1st and 10th of January sixty men were received from the State of Georgia, and the battery was shortly afterwards joined by fifteen volunteer recruits. This accession necessitated drill, which was had twice a day. The camp here was in a wood near Hightower Creek, a beautiful stream emptying into Etowah river The Third Maryland was, on the 23d of March, ordered to Dalton to rejoin the battalion which had been sent thither, to aid in repelling the enemy, now pressing that point. The command remained encamped near Dalton till the 6th of May. On the reorganization of the Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, Johnston's battalion, to which the Third Maryland belonged, was put in Smith's regiment, but was soon afterwards transferred to Beckham's regiment, of Hood's corps. The artillery was m
Chickamauga Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
hird Maryland, Johnny Hooper, who had been back with the wagons two miles in the rear, came up about dusk with the information that the center of the army was retreating, followed closely by the enemy, and that if we did not soon leave the field we should be captured. Nothing, of course, could be done without orders from General Stevenson, whose division was yet on the Ridge, fighting the enemy. About 7 P. M. he moved off the field, and sent orders to the Third Maryland to march to Chickamauga station, crossing Chickamauga river at the railroad bridge. An artillerists troubles. Then followed a series of troubles peculiar to the artillery service. On account of the darkness and the crookedness and roughness of the road, one of the gun carriages ran against a tree, and occasioned an unwelcome delay, as the enemy was in pursuit and not far behind. The piece had to be unlimbered, the gun-carriage run back, the piece limbered up again, and a cautious drive around the tree made.
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
by a little perseverance, all difficulties were overcome. Ringgold was reached on the night of the 25th, and the next day at 5 P. M., the battery encamped near Dalton. General Bragg was here superseded in the command of the army by General Joseph E. Johnston. In winter quarters. The command proceeded to Sugar Valley on a day. The camp here was in a wood near Hightower Creek, a beautiful stream emptying into Etowah river The Third Maryland was, on the 23d of March, ordered to Dalton to rejoin the battalion which had been sent thither, to aid in repelling the enemy, now pressing that point. The command remained encamped near Dalton till the 6Dalton till the 6th of May. On the reorganization of the Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, Johnston's battalion, to which the Third Maryland belonged, was put in Smith's regiment, but was soon afterwards transferred to Beckham's regiment, of Hood's corps. The artillery was made an independent body, no longer subject to the orders of divisio
Hightower Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, window and door. After their long campaigning, this was a delightful change. On the 20th of January, 1864, the whole battalion, for easier access to long forage, was ordered to Kingston, where it again built winter quarters. Between the 1st and 10th of January sixty men were received from the State of Georgia, and the battery was shortly afterwards joined by fifteen volunteer recruits. This accession necessitated drill, which was had twice a day. The camp here was in a wood near Hightower Creek, a beautiful stream emptying into Etowah river The Third Maryland was, on the 23d of March, ordered to Dalton to rejoin the battalion which had been sent thither, to aid in repelling the enemy, now pressing that point. The command remained encamped near Dalton till the 6th of May. On the reorganization of the Artillery of the Army of Tennessee, Johnston's battalion, to which the Third Maryland belonged, was put in Smith's regiment, but was soon afterwards transferred to Beckham'
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e battery from the Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth Georgia regiments to act as drivers. The battery encamped at the foot of Lookout Mountain on the 13th, and on the 23d joined Johnston's battalion, which was then encamped across Lookout Creek, near Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 23d of November, the enemy, under cover of a heavy fog, moved up and attacked the left wing of General Bragg's army, at the foot of Lookout Mountain, and drove it back rapidly, the line at that point being weak and the attack unexpected. The evacuation of Lookout Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the foLookout Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the following morning Johnston's battalion was ordered to the extreme right of the Confederate line, and reached the position assigned it at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Two of the batteries, Corput's and Carnes's, were ordered to the front at once, while the Third Maryland was held in reserve. In the struggle which ensued, the enemy w
Morton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ne of these except the one sent to General Stevenson. That officer approved of the application, and sent it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referred it to General Johnston. General Johnston's Adjutant, thinking the section had accompanied General Walker's division to Chickamauga, sent the application to General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
. The General asked him a great many questions with regard to his section, how long it had been on detached service, where it had been, &c. He said that as soon as he returned to his office, he would order the section to its original command. On the 19th of October the order came, and the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the batt
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