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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Morristown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
is spirit passed calmly and peacefully into the audience chamber of the blest. He was born in Claiborne county, Mississippi, in 1808, of a house and lineage, to the honor of which no word need be spoken before this assembly. As a youth he evidently manifested a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at
West Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
lineage, to the honor of which no word need be spoken before this assembly. As a youth he evidently manifested a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at once into public life; but public life as a matter of profession seemed to have no attractions for him, and returning to his native home he devoted hi
Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
Life and character of Ex-Governor B. G. Humphreys of Mississippi. [funeral eulogy at Port Gibson, December 27th, 1882.] By Rev. D. A. Planck. The occasion that calls us together to-day is not only a sad one, in which it is proper to weep with those who weep, but it is also one of opportunity, in which it is befitting to speak forth the praises of a great and good man. It is not too late to say over the bier of a friend or patriot or chieftain what might have seemed indelicate and immoderate flattery if spoken in his living presence; for, while their are some men whom it is our duty to forget, burying their memories with their bones; yet, there are others whom it becomes our duty to study; men whose lives are revelations, and whose histories are the unfolding of a manhood that reveals the purpose of their Creator. And such men merit our study, not only because their experiences may assist us in solving the problems of life (for such an aim might be marked with an intensit
Claiborne (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
r. Benjamin G. Humphreys, a native of your own soil, your friend and neighbor, a man of unblemished character, an actor in many scenes, the hero of many battles, is no more. As if conscious that his end was near, and weary of the struggles of life that were relentless even amidst the infirmities of age, he wrapped his mantle about him, ready to be gathered unto his fathers, and his spirit passed calmly and peacefully into the audience chamber of the blest. He was born in Claiborne county, Mississippi, in 1808, of a house and lineage, to the honor of which no word need be spoken before this assembly. As a youth he evidently manifested a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of
D. A. Planck (search for this): chapter 38
Life and character of Ex-Governor B. G. Humphreys of Mississippi. [funeral eulogy at Port Gibson, December 27th, 1882.] By Rev. D. A. Planck. The occasion that calls us together to-day is not only a sad one, in which it is proper to weep with those who weep, but it is also one of opportunity, in which it is befitting to speak forth the praises of a great and good man. It is not too late to say over the bier of a friend or patriot or chieftain what might have seemed indelicate and immoderate flattery if spoken in his living presence; for, while their are some men whom it is our duty to forget, burying their memories with their bones; yet, there are others whom it becomes our duty to study; men whose lives are revelations, and whose histories are the unfolding of a manhood that reveals the purpose of their Creator. And such men merit our study, not only because their experiences may assist us in solving the problems of life (for such an aim might be marked with an intensit
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 38
him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at once into public life; but public life as a matter of profession seemed to have no attractions for him, and returning to his native home he devoted himself to the unostentatious calling of a planter's life. And in this pursuit, which engaged but a small share of his diversified gifts, he found happiness a
Benjamin G. Humphreys (search for this): chapter 38
Life and character of Ex-Governor B. G. Humphreys of Mississippi. [funeral eulogy at Port Gibson, December 27th, 1882.] By Rev. D. A. Planck. The occasion that calls us together to-day is not only a sad one, in which it is proper to weep wit head the ripening fruit of wisdom and grace, integrity and virtue, benevolence and sympathy, piety and honor. Benjamin G. Humphreys, a native of your own soil, your friend and neighbor, a man of unblemished character, an actor in many scenes, th there went up a shout from the troops on the other side, applauding the daring but successful deed, and as soon as General Humphreys discovered that he was the subject of such applause, he put spurs to his horse and was soon out of sight in the wooo active and efficient service? The problem was solved by one of your own boys when he suggested the name of General Benj. G. Humphreys. At once all parties acknowleged his peculiar fitness, and as by acclamation he was made the custodian of the
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 38
raged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at once into public life; but public life as a matter of profession seemed to have no attractions for him, and returning to his native home he devoted himself to the unostentatious calling of a planter's life. And in this pursuit, which engaged but a small share of his diversified gift
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 38
a precocity that encouraged his father to give him special educational advantages, which at that early day were purchased at great expense and inconvenience. He passed through a preparatory course in a classical school at Morristown, New Jersey, a State long ago famous for its educational facilities, and afterwards received an appointment of cadetship in the national school at West Point. And while there he was associated as classmate and confederate with such men as Jefferson Davis, Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee, men of whom Southern history and Southern chivalry shall ever be justly proud. It might have been expected that by such associations and influences he would have been tempted at once into public life; but public life as a matter of profession seemed to have no attractions for him, and returning to his native home he devoted himself to the unostentatious calling of a planter's life. And in this pursuit, which engaged but a small share o
t was the new-born offspring of sudden occasion, but that grew out of the fact that he considered himself a member in the body politic, a joint of the great machinery that grinds out the people's progress and happiness; a spirit pure in its exercise, and one that sprang from a combination of disinterestedness, integrity and true benevolence, and is the product of the formative influence of many domestic charities. Some of you can recollect how promptly he came to the rescue, along with Judge Stamps, Hon. J. H. Maury and others, when the great fire had destroyed almost the entire business part of your town, and provided the means necessary to bridge over that almost fatal calamity. And before I pass from this line of remark, I would not fail to pay a tribute to that innate modesty that so adorned his character, and I had almost said achieved his greatness. He shrank from the gaze of men. He invariably took the lowest seat until invited to go up higher; and his whole life has bee
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