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Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
ving got his fill of grass, the other his fill of sunshine and rest. After all the care and devotion I gave to my steed, one of Grant's pilferers borrowed him the day of the surrender. If the mules had a hard time to make a living, it was worse for the men. The animals got little, but it was natural food; the men got little, and it was of a kind disgusting to the sharp-set hunger, that insufficiency both in quality and quantity made chronic. With the fertile valley of the Mississippi and Yazoo to draw from, millions of bushels of corn could have been stored in Vicksburg— abundant rations for the army and its animal equipment, and of a wholesome kind. Two days after we were closed in, Federal prisoners and our surplus mules were driven out because corn was scarce, and as time wore on, the bread of the period, issued to the men, was a cold glutinous paste, a compound of pea meal and flour. Was—finish the query with reference to General Pemberton or his Commissary General, to suit
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
me a sealed treasure to the sixteen thousand unfortunate Confederates inside of Vicksburg. It was lucky for the amour propre of our General-in-Chief, that his peer, Grant, did not mass his troops into columns of attack, and walk right in on the Jackson road the second day he drew up his sixty thousand men before the city, which he could have done if he had pushed his artillery in to take our works in reverse. Of course he would have had to sacrifice men, but not near as many as he lost in his charges on the stockaded breastworks to the left of the same road, and by disease in his camps. The morning the charges were made, I started by the way of the graveyard valley to the right of our line near the Jackson road, and met a soldier, about fifty years old, shot through both cheeks; the blood had clotted his long beard, and he was then trying to staunch the flow of the crimson flood. In his disengaged hand he carried a shotgun that had been struck by a ball, and the barrels splintere
Fort Hill (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
e strongly and more to his personal satisfaction, I told him that if there was any other line I would like to see it, and so we rode to what he designated as the Fort Hill line. After a careful inspection, I decided that it was the strongest position, and though only provided with a stockade and three lunettes, yet it was better tin them. One part of the fun was to stand by a member of the signal corps and let him tell you what they, the feds, were telegraphing by their flag signals. On Fort Hill we had a signal corps operator who was very skilled in reading the signal messages of Commodore Porter's fleet to General Grant's headquarters and vice versa; inthe intentions of the Federals at any of the signal stations. He reported that it was a part of Grant's plan to make a charge up the river road that ran between Fort Hill and the water batteries. So to make our outside friends comfortable and give them a warm reception, I had caused to be constructed three deep ditches across th
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 48
e rifle pits, telling the men we would rectify mistakes another time. The gray dawn, and the morning odor of the spring verdure, brought peace and pleasant thoughts. It tempted my mind to wandering in memory into the meadows and gardens of old Missouri, where home, and home interests, had made life an enchantment. War was forgotten, there was such contentment in the spring air, the winter had passed away, the plumes of the blue-green grass waved in the bright sunlight in harmonic swaying withhe bullet was not moulded that would kill him. His death put another name upon the tablet of eternity that was already emblazoned with the names of thousands who had died for love of country. When the Yankees blew up the mine in which so many Missouri troops lost their lives, the severed lines of others of their comrades kept back the surging numbers that mounted the parapet of the works. Like the knights of St. John, led by the grand master at Rhodes, they were in every gap and point of dan
M. H. Smith (search for this): chapter 48
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. Paper no. 2. By Major J. T. Hogane, of the Engineer Corps. The first man killed in Vicksburg was a Major of infantry belonging to General Vaughn's command. I had just reported to General Vaughn for duty as engineer officer of the line under command of Major-General Smith, and as a social recognition, he told me the news of the Major's death, how that he had crept between the opposing lines to relieve a wounded man, and there met his death. The angel of charity certainly had not far to come to meet him and to offer him the hand of fellowship. This fight was on the north side of Vicksburg, and outside the works proper. In company with a Lieutenant of engineers, I inspected the line of works to which I had been assigned, and was pleased with the strength of the natural position until I came to a depression in the line commanded by adjoining points. I asked the officer if he thought we could hold that position. Why not? he asked, and
J. C. Pemberton (search for this): chapter 48
pits unfit to protect the troops. Accordingly, and in consequence of the urgency of the case, I sent a dispatch to General Pemberton direct, recommending the second line. At midnight, the order to fall back was issued, and the troops fell into linead of the work of hate and war. General Grant had missed his chance. If he had pushed pellmell into Vicksburg with Pemberton's rear guard, the contractors might have suffered, but his reputation or his men would not. There were many funny incket, thinking perhaps that it was better to put an entire new play on the stage. The only one graceful favor that General Pemberton had the power to render was the consent he gave to a truce to bury the braves who had fallen in the charges upon oud to the men, was a cold glutinous paste, a compound of pea meal and flour. Was—finish the query with reference to General Pemberton or his Commissary General, to suit your own fancy. A personal loss was felt by every Missourian the day that Gener
J. T. Hogane (search for this): chapter 48
Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. Paper no. 2. By Major J. T. Hogane, of the Engineer Corps. The first man killed in Vicksburg was a Major of infantry belonging to General Vaughn's command. I had just reported to General Vaughn for duty as engineer officer of the line under command of Major-General Smith, and as a social recognition, he told me the news of the Major's death, how that he had crept between the opposing lines to relieve a wounded man, and there met his death. The angel of charity certainly had not far to come to meet him and to offer him the hand of fellowship. This fight was on the north side of Vicksburg, and outside the works proper. In company with a Lieutenant of engineers, I inspected the line of works to which I had been assigned, and was pleased with the strength of the natural position until I came to a depression in the line commanded by adjoining points. I asked the officer if he thought we could hold that position. Why not? he asked, and a
Frederick Grant (search for this): chapter 48
urg. It was lucky for the amour propre of our General-in-Chief, that his peer, Grant, did not mass his troops into columns of attack, and walk right in on the Jacksree to enter upon the work of peace instead of the work of hate and war. General Grant had missed his chance. If he had pushed pellmell into Vicksburg with Pembe very skilled in reading the signal messages of Commodore Porter's fleet to General Grant's headquarters and vice versa; in fact, there seemed to be no difficulty in the Federals at any of the signal stations. He reported that it was a part of Grant's plan to make a charge up the river road that ran between Fort Hill and the wathe iron swept area of the now consumed depot. Of all the cannonading that General Grant ordered, the least effective, for the cost, was the bombardment by the flee sunshine and rest. After all the care and devotion I gave to my steed, one of Grant's pilferers borrowed him the day of the surrender. If the mules had a hard ti
Wharton J. Green (search for this): chapter 48
abundant rations for the army and its animal equipment, and of a wholesome kind. Two days after we were closed in, Federal prisoners and our surplus mules were driven out because corn was scarce, and as time wore on, the bread of the period, issued to the men, was a cold glutinous paste, a compound of pea meal and flour. Was—finish the query with reference to General Pemberton or his Commissary General, to suit your own fancy. A personal loss was felt by every Missourian the day that General Green was killed. He had been cautioned not to expose himself several times, and, a few minutes before he was hit, had remarked that the bullet was not moulded that would kill him. His death put another name upon the tablet of eternity that was already emblazoned with the names of thousands who had died for love of country. When the Yankees blew up the mine in which so many Missouri troops lost their lives, the severed lines of others of their comrades kept back the surging numbers that mo
Dawson Major (search for this): chapter 48
nd met a soldier, about fifty years old, shot through both cheeks; the blood had clotted his long beard, and he was then trying to staunch the flow of the crimson flood. In his disengaged hand he carried a shotgun that had been struck by a ball, and the barrels splintered by it. I condoled with him about his wound, and asked him where he was going. He replied that he was going to get another gun. Of such was the Southern soldier made. A little way further up the valley I came across a Missouri Major, trying to get a piece of artillery to the stockade; he had got the gun in a ditch, and from want of concert between Major, mules, drivers, and drink, that all hands seemed to be filled up with, it seemed likely that the gun would remain in status quo. I volunteered to assist; the Major met me half-way by offering the bung-hole of his little keg of whisky. As an amendment, I proposed to lubricate the mules by giving the drivers a drink, which was agreed to. After getting the mules stret
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