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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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o to show what Flag-officer Goldsborough thought of the Merrimac, and in citing them, I wish it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal an
Franklin Buchanan (search for this): chapter 5
nterest in the famous Battle of Hampton Roads, and elicited a number of papers worth preserving for the use of the future historian. The official report of Admiral Buchanan (Vol. 7, page 305, Southern Historical Society Papers), and the admirable narrative of Captain Catesby Ap. R. Jones (which we printed in the Southern Magazi On March 8, 1862, the Virginia steamed out of Norfolk to attack the frigates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads. She was commanded by Admiral Franklin Buchanan. She first encountered the United States frigate Cumberland, whom she struck with her prow and sunk—her iron prow was broken off in the collision and erland, to exchange some of her guns, and to make some small repairs to her armor and machinery. On the 11th of April Commodore Tattnall, who had succeeded Commodore Buchanan in the command, went down with his entire squadron, consisting of the Merrimac, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Beaufort and Raleigh, to offer battle to t
L. Thomas (search for this): chapter 5
alized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the Elizabeth river to prevent the Merrimac again coming out. I have the honor, &c., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. And on page 752 I find the following: Navy Department, March 13, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir,—I have the honor to suggest that this Department can easily obstruct the channel to Norfolk so as to prevent the exit of the Merrimac, provided the army will carry the Sewell's Point batteries, in which duty the navy will give great assistance. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles. Be it remembered that the above extracts are all dated March 13t
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 5
official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe fo the exit of the Merrimac, provided the army will carry the Sewell's Point batteries, in which duty the navy will give great assistance. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles. Be it remembered that the above extracts are all dated March 13th, four days after the so-called victory of the Monitor over the Merrimac! Would it not sels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monitor whipped the Merrimac o
H. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 5
nd I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the fcould not have gotten to Washington or Baltimore in her normal condition; (6) that she could not have gone to sea at all; (7) that, although she could have run by the Federal fleet and Old Point (barring torpedoes in the channel) and threatened McClellan's base at Yorktown, in exceptionably good weather, yet would have had to leave the James river open. VII. For the truth of the very important facts mentioned in sections I, II and III, I am willing to abide by the log-book of the Monitor, t
D. H. Maury (search for this): chapter 5
Buchanan (Vol. 7, page 305, Southern Historical Society Papers), and the admirable narrative of Captain Catesby Ap. R. Jones (which we printed in the Southern Magazine and shall reprint hereafter), settle the question beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan influence can prevail on Congress to grant this absurd claim of the crew of the Monitor. General D. H. Maury has given a summary of the facts in the following letter addressed to Senator Johnston: Letter from General Maury. office of the Southern Historical Society, November, 1882. Senator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . Dear Sir,—At your request I forward to you the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate ironclad, Virginia (Merrimac) and the Federal fleet, consisting of the Monitor (ironclad) and the Cumberland, Congress, and Minnesota. On March 8, 1862, the Virginia steamed out of Norfolk to attack the frigates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads
statement of the question: Letter from Captain Parker. Norfolk, Va., December 11, 1882. To the Editor of the Landmark The claim of the crew of the U. S. S. Monitor for prize money for the destruction of the Confederate vessel Virginia (Merrimac) has naturally called forth many letters from those engaged in the naval operations in Hampton Roads from March 8, 1862, to May 6, 1862. I commanded the Beaufort in the battles of the 8th and 9th of March, and in the operations under Commodore Tattnal, to which I shall allude. In fact, I may say I commanded a consort of the Merrimac from the time she was put in commission until she was blown up. I therefore profess to be familiar with her history. The battle of March 8th I propose describing at some future day, in order to show more particularly what part the wooden vessels took in that memorable engagement. The battle of March 9th—that between the Monitor and the Merrimac—has been fully described by Captain Catesby Jones, her
W. H. Parker (search for this): chapter 5
e Merrimac by no means regarded the Monitor as a lion in her path. Having served on the Merrimac from the time work was first begun upon her until the night of her destruction, in justice to all concerned, and that honor may be done to whom honor is due, I simply desire the facts to be known. H. B. Littlepage. Washington, Feb. 21. The following letter from Captain W. H. Parker to the Norfolk Landmark, is also an interesting and unanswerable statement of the question: Letter from Captain Parker. Norfolk, Va., December 11, 1882. To the Editor of the Landmark The claim of the crew of the U. S. S. Monitor for prize money for the destruction of the Confederate vessel Virginia (Merrimac) has naturally called forth many letters from those engaged in the naval operations in Hampton Roads from March 8, 1862, to May 6, 1862. I commanded the Beaufort in the battles of the 8th and 9th of March, and in the operations under Commodore Tattnal, to which I shall allude. In fact, I may
John W. Johnston (search for this): chapter 5
n beyond peradventure, and we cannot conceive that partizan influence can prevail on Congress to grant this absurd claim of the crew of the Monitor. General D. H. Maury has given a summary of the facts in the following letter addressed to Senator Johnston: Letter from General Maury. office of the Southern Historical Society, November, 1882. Senator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . Dear Sir,—At your request I forward to you the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between thSenator John W. Johnston, of Virginia . Dear Sir,—At your request I forward to you the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate ironclad, Virginia (Merrimac) and the Federal fleet, consisting of the Monitor (ironclad) and the Cumberland, Congress, and Minnesota. On March 8, 1862, the Virginia steamed out of Norfolk to attack the frigates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads. She was commanded by Admiral Franklin Buchanan. She first encountered the United States frigate Cumberland, whom she struck with her prow and sunk—her iron prow was broken off in the collision and sunk with the Cu<
fter the Merrimac and the two other steamers headed for my ship, and I then felt to the fullest extent my condition. I was hard and immovably aground, and they could take position under my stern and rake me. I had expended most of my solid shot; my ship was badly crippled, and my officers and men were worn out with fatigue, but even in this extreme dilemma I determined never to give up the ship to the rebels, and after consulting with my officers I ordered every preparation to be made to destroy the ship after all hope was gone of saving her. On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monitor whipped the Merrimac on that occasion stand? Respectfully, Wm. H. Parker.
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