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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Dear Sir,—At your request I forward to you the essential facts about the Battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate ironclad, Virginia (Merrimac) and the Federal fleet, consisting of the Monitor (ironclad) and the Cumberland, Congress, and Minnesota. On March 8, 1862, the Virginia steamed out of Norfolk to attack the frigates Congress and Cumberland, then lying in Hampton Roads. She was commanded by Admiral Franklin Buchanan. She first encountered the United States frigate Cumberlan In stating the above facts I do not wish to detract one iota from the just deserts of the brave officers and men of the Monitor. They did their whole duty, but not more gallantly than their less fortunate comrades on the Cumberland, Congress, Minnesota and other ships in the Roads, and are therefore no more entitled to prize money. Those on the Merrimac by no means regarded the Monitor as a lion in her path. Having served on the Merrimac from the time work was first begun upon her until the
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
On March 8, 1862, the Virginia steamed out of Norfolk to attack the frigates Congress and Cumberlan The Virginia the next morning returned to Norfolk, went into dock and repaired damages—put on as disabled and driven from Hampton Roads into Norfolk is entirely incorrect and absurb. It only coide being favorable, the Merrimac returned to Norfolk, where she was docked. She was then thorough mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island ane question: Letter from Captain Parker. Norfolk, Va., December 11, 1882. To the Editor of the Laring battle, and protecting the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond, and then went up to the Navy Ya three ironclads. When the fact was known in Norfolk, the Merrimac cast off from her moorings and Department can easily obstruct the channel to Norfolk so as to prevent the exit of the Merrimac, prment, efficiently protected the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond until Norfolk was evacuated; (5)[6 more...]
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
morial claims that the Monitor not only whipped the Merrimac on the 9th of March but that she ever after prevented her from going below Old Point; and thus saved Baltimore, Washington, and even New York!!! The answer to this is that the Merrimac could not have gone to Baltimore or Washington without lightening her so much that she Baltimore or Washington without lightening her so much that she would no longer have been an ironclad: that is, she would have risen in the water so as to expose her unarmored sides. As to her going outside of Cape Henry it was impossible; she would have foundered. She could not have lived in Hampton Roads in a moderate gale. I served in the Palmetto State at Charleston, a similarly constngagement, efficiently protected the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond until Norfolk was evacuated; (5) that the Merrimac could not have gotten to Washington or Baltimore in her normal condition; (6) that she could not have gone to sea at all; (7) that, although she could have run by the Federal fleet and Old Point (barring torped
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
mediately upon the claim of the Monitor for prize money, that I venture to submit the following: I. After the battle of the 9th of March, the Merrimac went into dock to replace the prow, or ram, which had been lost in sinking the Cumberland, to exchange some of her guns, and to make some small repairs to her armor and machinery. On the 11th of April Commodore Tattnall, who had succeeded Commodore Buchanan in the command, went down with his entire squadron, consisting of the Merrimac, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Beaufort and Raleigh, to offer battle to the Federal fleet then lying in Hampton Roads, or below Old Point. The Merrimac was the only iron-clad. Upon the appearance of our squadron the entire Federal fleet retreated below the Rip-Raps, or under the guns of Old Point. Three merchant vessels were run on shore by their masters between Newport's News and Old Point, and were partially abandoned. The Jamestown and Raleigh towed them off almost under the guns of Old Point
Craney Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ress Monroe and the Rip-Raps. The Merrimac pursued at full speed until she came well under the fire of the latter port, when she retired to her moorings at the mouth of the river. After the evacuation of Norfolk the Merrimac was taken above Craney Island and blown up on the 11th of May. The Monitor was then up James river, having gone up the day before, and was probably more than fifty miles away. She had refused the gage of battle offered her by the Merrimac daily since the 11th of April. ter consulting with my officers I ordered every preparation to be made to destroy the ship after all hope was gone of saving her. On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. I have the honor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monit
Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
at we would either make a prize of or destroy the Monitor when we met again. On the 11th of April, all being ready for the expected fray, the Merrimac again went to Hampton Roads. The Monitor was laying at our moorings, at the mouth of the Elizabeth river, publishing to the world that she was blockading the Merrimac. Greatly to our surprise she refused to fight us, and as we approached she gracefully retired, and closely hugged the shore under the guns of Fortress Monroe. As if to provoke hngton, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the Elizabeth river to prevent the Merrimac again coming out. I have the honor, &c., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. And on page 752 I find the following: Navy Department, March 13, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir,—I have the honor to
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Point beyond her reach and never again came out. The Virginia maintained this attitude of defiance and victory until May 11th, 1862, when Norfolk was evacuated by the Confederate forces and all stores and munitions of war not movable were destroyed, including the Virginia (Merrimac). These facts are attested by eye-witnesses and actors in these events of high authority, and are drawn from carefully prepared narratives and reports in the office of the Southern Historical Society in the capitol of Virginia. With high respect your obedient servant, Dabney H. Maury, Chairman Executive Committeee S. H S. Midshipman Littlepage who was on the Merrimac, furnished the following to the Washington Post. Statement of midshipman Littlepage. To the Editor of The Post.—From the article which appeared in the columns of The Post this morning, I learn that the officers and men of the Monitor have memorialized Congress for prize money for the disabling of the Merrimac by that vessel.
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sh it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
retired, and closely hugged the shore under the guns of Fortress Monroe. As if to provoke her to combat, the Jamestown was sent in, and she captured several prizes, in which the Monitor seemed to acquiesce, as she offered no resistance. French and English men-of-war were present; the latter cheered and dipped their flags as the Jamestown passed with the prizes. On the 8th of May, when the Merrimac had returned to Norfolk for supplies, a squadron consisting of the Monitor, Naugatuck and Galena (iron-clads) and five large men-of-war, commenced to bombard our batteries at Sewell's Point. The Merrimac immediately left Norfolk for the scene of conflict. As she approached the squadron at full speed the Vanberbilt, one of the fastest steamers then afloat, which, we understood, had been fitted with a prow especially for ramming us, joined the other ships. We regarded the attack as an invitation to come out, and we expected a most desperate encounter. Much to the disappointment of our
Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hreatened McClellan's base at Yorktown, in exceptionably good weather, yet would have had to leave the James river open. VII. For the truth of the very important facts mentioned in sections I, II and III, I am willing to abide by the log-book of the Monitor, the dispatches of Flag officer Goldsborough, or the testimony of Commander Dana Greene, United States Navy, who was the gallant and efficient executive officer of the Monitor from the day she left New York until she foundered off Cape Hatteras. VIII. In conclusion I would like to say, and I do so most cheerfully, that the Monitor made her appearance in Hampton Roads at a critical time—the night of the 8th of March, 1862—and although an untried vessel, of a new and peculiar construction, did on the next day what the old Federal fleet present declined to do—she fought the Merrimac. If the claim for a reward was put upon this ground alone, no one would be more gratified to see it granted her gallant crew than myself; but t<
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