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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Broad Mountain (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
to the necessary and required discipline, General Bragg, with Hardee and Polk's corps, crossed the Tennessee river at Harrison's Ferry, nine miles above Chattanooga (we had but one transport, and consequently were several days crossing, which allowed the boys in gray an opportunity of bathing, the last they enjoyed until we captured Mumfordsville, on the Green river), and moving over Waldem's Ridge (it should, in respect and deference to its size, have been more properly called High and Broad mountain) and Cumberland mountain, turned Buell's left; and on the 5th of September the Confederate column was greeted with a large sign board, nailed by our advance pioneer corps to a tree on the side of the road, with these words appearing on it in bold relief: You now cross from Tennessee to Kentucky. That was the dividing line between two States, and well did the boys in dirty gray make the welkin ring as they at one step bounded across the narrow but visible line drawn for their observation
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 72
the retreat on the 8th of October, 1862, crossing Duck river, passing Camp Dick Robinson (then newly dubbed Camp Breckinridge), Crab Orchard, Mt. Vernon, Wild-Cat Bend, Cumberland Gap, and on to Knoxville. The Federals, finding it useless, pursued but little south of Crab Orchard. The fruits of this campaign in supplies, provisions, and all the necessary appendages of an army, were almost fabulous. Think of nearly four thousand wagons, a majority of which were branded with the letters U. S., heavily loaded with the best and every variety of jeans, warm blankets, provisions, and other spoils of our oversupplied foes; several thousand head of cattle, the finest the eye ever beheld, and in truth, only by a hungered people, too fine to slaughter; besides, more than a thousand mules and as many sheep, and you have some approximate idea of what good that campaign was to an impoverished and starving Confederacy of people, to say nothing of the experience gained in the realization of t
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
rom spies, he broke up camps on the morning of the 25th of December, and pouring down his hordes by way of the Wilson, Nolinsville, Murfreesboroa, and Jefferson turnpikes, drove our outposts back to the main line, established near and crossing Stone river, a short distance in front of the railroad bridge, with its right resting on Lebanon pike. It will be remembered that General Joseph E. Johnston had been placed in command of this Confederate department, but did not engage in active field ope statu quo until the evening of the 2d of January, 1863, when Breckinridge was ordered to attack the enemy's left, in anticipation of the intention of Rosecrans to turn and attack us in rear. Breckinridge burst in mass upon the enemy, crossed Stone river, fording that stream for the purpose, and soon one of the most bitter conflicts of the war ensued. Both sides massed their artillery and used it with terrible effect. But it was soon seen that the enemy's position was too strong, and that Br
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
sides their guns and accoutrements, and continued until everything of value had been carried to the woods, a full mile in our rear. On retiring with the withdrawal of the flag, and reaching our men in rear, I found that the dead were being hastily buried, and the living were preparing to return to Cave City. This surprised me; for pending the flag of truce Lieutenant Watt L. Strickland, an aid on General Chalmers's staff, came up, and, calling me aside, said that General J. K. Jackson, of Georgia, was near with a division of infantry, and that on his arrival the attack would be renewed and successfully pressed. It appears, however, that this information furnished the enemy at the time of the demand for a surrender — was a ruse on the part of General Chalmers, in order to extricate his men from their perilous situation. Finding that the enemy was too strong for him, and were veterans instead of raw recruits, he returned in quick haste to Cave City. On the 16th (two days later) Gen
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
evented. Battle of Perryville. General Buell, learning the position of our forces near Perryville, determined on attacking us there. Bragg wisely prepared to receive and give him battle, and,nder the immediate command of Buell, then rapidly, and, as they thought, securely, approaching Perryville, hoping to crush them in detail, and thereby remain for a time at least master of the situatioghtly harrassed, passed on and in time united with Buell's forces, then being driven back from Perryville, and turned the tide of battle against us, which, till his arrival, had rolled so proudly at oe suppressed its utterance, that General Bragg's original plan was not to engage the enemy at Perryville, but, on the other hand, if his orders had been obeyed, the battle field would have been elsewisk of life or capture to join and resume immediate command of his troops near Harrodsburg and Perryville, and make an effort to repair the mistakes of his subordinate. Hence the battle of Perryville
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
th a large sign board, nailed by our advance pioneer corps to a tree on the side of the road, with these words appearing on it in bold relief: You now cross from Tennessee to Kentucky. That was the dividing line between two States, and well did the boys in dirty gray make the welkin ring as they at one step bounded across the narrgement, necessitating Bragg's retreat out of Kentucky by Cumberland Gap. Van Dorn's army, had it been successful at Corinth, was to have cooperated with us in Tennessee and Kentucky, insuring success to our arms in the latter State. But few know the fact, or knowing it have suppressed its utterance, that General Bragg's originamen. It is hoping against hope. The Tennessee campaign. After the army had rested for a while from its arduous trials, Bragg commenced his movements into Tennessee preparatory to an advance on Nashville. Tulehoma and Shelbyville were his rallying points, with outposts at Murfreesboroa, Eagleville, &c.; and finally, in Dece
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
division commander, General Withers, that he could find no line to support—that there were no Confederate forces save his own picket line in his front. This was immediately dispatched to Army Headquarters, and soon thereafter a courier rode up to General Anderson's position with orders for his Assistant Adjutant General to report at army headquarters without delay. Following the courier for several miles, we finally drew up our tired steeds in front of one of the finest mansions in Murfreesboro, and on making myself known I was invited by an aid-de-camp of General Bragg into a large double-roomed folding parlor, elegantly furnished, where sat the commander in chief, surrounded by his corps and division commanders. Besmeared with mud, and tired from exposure and loss of sleep, I felt decidedly out of place in this galaxy of Generals, but on entering the room I was somewhat relieved when General Withers rising introduced me as the officer who had penciled the dispatch about whi
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
eneral Bragg's design was to unite with him at the capital of the State and solidly advance on Louisville, his objective point. Moving for that purpose through Glasgow (where God bless the ladies witf Buell's (he was then marching up from Nashville) communications northward by the railroad to Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot supplies at Cave Cig, we halted for rest around the latter places, when Buell, whose army had marched straight to Louisville, and receiving heavy reinforcements, returned to give battle to our forces. General Bragg'sn the other hand, if his orders had been obeyed, the battle field would have been elsewhere or Louisville surrendered to our forces. It was, as well as the writer can from memory recall, in substancejor-General, in command. On arriving at the capital he determined on making a coup de main on Louisville with Smith's troops, sufficiently supported, whilst Polk was ordered to make a flank movement,
Cave City (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
th his main force, sent forward the same night (September 12th) Chalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the depot next below (south), with orders to intercept and cut off Buell's (he was trd by the railroad to Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot supplies at Cave City, but owing to the information furnished the enemy by Union citizens of the neighborhood we did not succeed in capturingd reaching our men in rear, I found that the dead were being hastily buried, and the living were preparing to return to Cave City. This surprised me; for pending the flag of truce Lieutenant Watt L. Strickland, an aid on General Chalmers's staff, cFinding that the enemy was too strong for him, and were veterans instead of raw recruits, he returned in quick haste to Cave City. On the 16th (two days later) General Bragg moved up and surrounded these forces, then reinforced and numbering 4,500
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
to repair the mistakes of his subordinate. Hence the battle of Perryville, of necessity fought, and fought under the circumstances, with its consequent disastrous results. In this campaign General Bragg accomplished all that it was possible for him or any other General at that time similarly circumstanced to do, but not as much as he had hoped when he entered her borders. Retreat out of Kentucky. With saddened hearts we commenced the retreat on the 8th of October, 1862, crossing Duck river, passing Camp Dick Robinson (then newly dubbed Camp Breckinridge), Crab Orchard, Mt. Vernon, Wild-Cat Bend, Cumberland Gap, and on to Knoxville. The Federals, finding it useless, pursued but little south of Crab Orchard. The fruits of this campaign in supplies, provisions, and all the necessary appendages of an army, were almost fabulous. Think of nearly four thousand wagons, a majority of which were branded with the letters U. S., heavily loaded with the best and every variety of je
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