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Barnesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
at Hagerstown and D. H. Hill at Boonsboro. We left McClellan on the 9th occupying the ridges along the line of the Seneca. On the 10th he moved his centre some five miles further to Damascus and Clarksburgh, and his left to Poolesville and Barnesville where he came in contact with Stuart's lines. The duty of the cavalry was only to cover the movements of Lee which had begun that morning, and Stuart merely held his position until pressed back by McClellan's infantry. On the 11th he withdred Ijamsville, while his left, under Franklin, still dragged behind close to the Potomac. Burnside was in contact with Stuart's cavalry at Hagans; but Sumner and Franklin were at least twelve miles from an enemy while they camped at Urbana and Barnesville. The next day, September 13th, Walker, McLaws and Jackson, completed the investment of Harpers Ferry. Halleck and Stanton were telegraphing McClellan with hot wires to save the army and material there. Frederick is twenty miles from Har
Seneca Creek, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
cavalry retaining its line. On the same day McClellan moved out as far as Rockville, which brought him within fifteen miles of Stuart's pickets. By the 9th he had cautiously pushed out some eight or nine miles further, the right wing, under Burnside, occupying Brookville; the centre Middlebrook, and Franklin on the left Darnestown; while Couch was kept close on the Potomac at the mouth of Seneca. The position thus taken by Mc-Clellan was a defensive one, on the ridges along the line of Seneca Creek, and was intended by him to be occupied in defensive battle. He had no idea of attacking, and, as far as can be seen, his single hope was to interpose such a force in front of Washington as might best defend an advance from the conquering legions of Lee. General McClellan was undoubtedly overpowered by his own estimate of the forces, moral, political and military, of his adversary. He knew Lee's character, and his career in Mexi co. He knew the value of personality in war, and he kne
Picton (Canada) (search for this): chapter 102
l De Saussure, clung to some strong stone houses on the edge of the town, where he held back Wilcox's advance. Jenkins followed Drayton, and Pickett and Evans were then ordered back by Jones. The battle was lost, for Burnside was within two hundred yards of Lee's only line of communication and retreat. There were no reinforcements. The last man had been used up. Where was Hill then? Where was the light division, with its gallant chief, who loved to liken himself and his command to Picton and that light division which was Wellington's right arm and sabre in the Peninsula? De Saussure was holding on with desperate tenacity to the stone barn and houses. Toombs was forming his Georgians well in hand to strike. But they were all that stood between Lee and rout. Just then up the Shepherdstown road came the head of Hill's column, with the long free stride that had brought it seventeen miles from Harpers Ferry and across the Potomac Ford since sunrise. The brigades of the lig
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
as orator of the evening, General Bradley T. Johnson, of Baltimore. General Johnson was greeted with hearty cheers, and was Blue Ridge, in order that, by threatening Washington and Baltimore, the enemy would be forced to withdraw from the south banmore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was pok movement down the north bank of the Potomac, to move on Baltimore, or to invade Pennsylvania, were questions which at that army in such order as continually to keep Washington and Baltimore covered, and at the same time to hold the troops well in f Frederick, but whether his intention was to move toward Baltimore or Pennsylvania was not then known. Lee's whole army hhave been. The army of McClellan would have been routed, Baltimore and Washington opened to the Confederates, and then—what? to the North, and with the possibility of the capture of Baltimore and Washington, the recognition of the Confederacy by the
Howe Hill (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
reduce Virginia. His order was in these words: headquarters, Washington, Sept. 2d, 1862. General,—General Halleck instructed me to report to you the order he sent this morning, to withdraw your army to Washington, without unnecessary delay. He feared that his messenger might miss you, and desired to take this double precaution. In order to bring troops upon ground with which they are already familiar, it would be best to move Porter's Corps upon Upton's Hill, that it may occupy Hall's Hill, &c.; McDowell's to Upton's Hill; Franklin's to the works in front of Alexandria; Heintzelman's to the a prayer on their lips, but no tear in their eyes, bade them good-bye and God-speed in the day of battle. Never, in truth, had any soldiery such unanimity of thought, purpose and feeling as the infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia. In its ranks the professional man, the student and the farmer, the merchant and the mechanic, the old and the young, the rich and the poor, fought s
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
Banks, Fremont, Shields, McClellan and Pope. Jackson's men had been marching and fighting from Mayown somewhat back to the Hagerstown pike, and Jackson's division under J. R. Jones, with its right eyond, Early being at right angles to Starke, Jackson's left brigade, and formed Lee's extreme left on the flanks. In the cornfield they struck Jackson's division, I,600 strong, and the brigades ofed; Starke, who succeeded Jones in command of Jackson's division, was killed; Lawton's brigade lostrigsby and Stafford rallied 200 or 300 men of Jackson's division and kept them in line. But TrimblGrigsby, and Stafford, with their handfull of Jackson's division, and Green was easily held back byond into the west woods, in full march beyond Jackson's left, then held by Early with his own briga of troops was necessary to protect them from Jackson's attack. D. H. Hill, in the meantime, had rrpsburg. The Confederates were used up. Of Jackson's and Ewell's divisions, Early, alone, with t[2 more...]
Maryland Line (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association The annual gathering of this Association in the State capitol at Richmond took place on the evening of October the 23d, 1884, and was an occasion of more than ordinary interest. A large number of distinguished Confederates were present—a notable feature of the occasion being that about twenty-five veterans of the Maryland Line, under command of General Geo. H. Steuart, came as an escort to the orator, and were enthusiastically welcomed by their Virginia comrades—and the hall was packed with a brilliant audience. General W. H. F. Lee, President of the Association, called the meeting to order, Chaplain J. Wm. Jones led in prayer, and General Lee (in graceful, appropriate and very complimentary phrase) then introduced, as orator of the evening, General Bradley T. Johnson, of Baltimore. General Johnson was greeted with hearty cheers, and was frequently interrupted with warm applause as he delivered the follo
Middletown Valley (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
e of Burnside's two corps; and during the 13th the cavalry made two separate stands against the Federal infantry in Middletown Valley, for the purpose of saving time and retarding the advance. By noon of the 13th, however, Burnside had obtained possesssion of the top of the mountain at Hagans. From that point is a most extensive and lovely view. Middletown Valley, rich in orchards, farm houses, barns, and flocks and herds spread before you, down to the Potomac and Virginia on the left, and asses over it. He found the pass occupied by D. H. Hill, and turned Hampton off to the left and South, to move down Middletown valley by the foot of the mountain, to Crampton's Gap, which he considered the weakest part of Lee's lines. Hampton, on apital condition. On the National road, three columns could move abreast, with numerous roads over Catoctin, across Middletown Valley. Over the road from Buckeyestown, Franklin could have marched his troops in a double column to Crampton's. McClell
Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
wo corps; and during the 13th the cavalry made two separate stands against the Federal infantry in Middletown Valley, for the purpose of saving time and retarding the advance. By noon of the 13th, however, Burnside had obtained possesssion of the top of the mountain at Hagans. From that point is a most extensive and lovely view. Middletown Valley, rich in orchards, farm houses, barns, and flocks and herds spread before you, down to the Potomac and Virginia on the left, and up to Mason and Dixon's line and Pennsylvania on the right. The South Mountain, or Blue Ridge, stretches out, a wall of green on the western side of this Elysian scene, while Catoctin forms its eastern bounds. From Hagans the gap at Harpers Ferry is plainly visible. With a good glass you can see through it to the line and hills beyond. On the Maryland Heights was a high tower, erected for a signal station, and flags on it, and at Hagans it could have been readily distinguished. They were not eighteen miles a
Brookville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
s were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of September 5th. On the 6th, Leemoved his infantry to Frederick, the cavalry retaining its line. On the same day McClellan moved out as far as Rockville, which brought him within fifteen miles of Stuart's pickets. By the 9th he had cautiously pushed out some eight or nine miles further, the right wing, under Burnside, occupying Brookville; the centre Middlebrook, and Franklin on the left Darnestown; while Couch was kept close on the Potomac at the mouth of Seneca. The position thus taken by Mc-Clellan was a defensive one, on the ridges along the line of Seneca Creek, and was intended by him to be occupied in defensive battle. He had no idea of attacking, and, as far as can be seen, his single hope was to interpose such a force in front of Washington as might best defend an advance from the conquering legions of Lee. Ge
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