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Frederick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
Monocacy, and crossed at White's Ford. During the night of the 4th and day of the 5th, Lee's whole army crossed at the same place, the cavalry, under Stuart, bringing up the rear. The infantry camped that night at the Three Springs, in Frederick county, nine miles from Frederick. The cavalry passedat once to the flank, and extended an impenetrable veil of pickets across Montgomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the NaFrederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of September 5th. On the 6th, Leemoved his infantry to Frederick, the cavalry retaining its line. On the same day McClellan
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
erals McClellan and Pope, says he, had now been brought back to the point from which they set out on the campaigns of the Spring and Summer. The objects of their campaigns had been frustrated, and the designs of the enemy on the coast of North Carolina and Western Virginia thwarted by the withdrawal of the main body of his forces from those regions. Northeastern Virginia was freed from the presence of Federal soldiers up to the intrenchments of Washington, and soon after the arrival of the that had brought it seventeen miles from Harpers Ferry and across the Potomac Ford since sunrise. The brigades of the light division deployed at a double-quick. Pender and Brocken-borough on the right, Branch, Gregg and Archer on the left, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama joining hands with Toombs and D. R. Jones, they went through Rodman and Wilcox with a rush and saved the day. Burnside withdrew to a position in front of the bridge, and later in t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 102
hose who had borne arms in the defence of the Confederate States that an organization should be formed for thefirst day of January, 1862, the President of the United States issued a general order, somewhat theatrical, to all of the armies of the United States, directing them to make a general advance on the 22d of February, then ein the general movement on the Capital of the Confederate States. Burnside's army occupied Roanoke Island andessary achievement of the independence of the Confederate States. During the summer of 1862, the Emperor ofbeen openly in sympathy with the cause of the Confederate States, and under the name of, sometimes mediation, e Potomac and of Virginia. The President of the United States, distracted by grave cares, seems to have been tle flag of the Confederacy on the capitol of the United States, conquer an acknowledgement and recognition by th the men were lacking, flaunted the flag of the United States, defiantly in the face of the Confederate column
Urbana (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
in Frederick county, nine miles from Frederick. The cavalry passedat once to the flank, and extended an impenetrable veil of pickets across Montgomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of September 5th. On the 6th, Leemoved his infantry to Frederick, the cavalry retaining its line. On the same day McClellan moved out as far as Rockville, which brought him within fifteen miles of Stuart's pickets. By the 9th he had cautiously pushed out some eight or nine miles further, the right wing, under Burnside, occupying Brookville; the centre Middleb
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
ombs was forming his Georgians well in hand to strike. But they were all that stood between Lee and rout. Just then up the Shepherdstown road came the head of Hill's column, with the long free stride that had brought it seventeen miles from Harpers Ferry and across the Potomac Ford since sunrise. The brigades of the light division deployed at a double-quick. Pender and Brocken-borough on the right, Branch, Gregg and Archer on the left, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama joining hands with Toombs and D. R. Jones, they went through Rodman and Wilcox with a rush and saved the day. Burnside withdrew to a position in front of the bridge, and later in the afternoon, to the east side of the bridge, having ordered Morell's division of the Fifth corps to occupy his position in front of A. P. Hill. As soon as Burnside's repulse was assured, Jackson ordered Stuart to turn the Federal right with his cavalry and J. G. Walker with his division to suppo
Urbana (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
from Frederick; all the rest of the Twelfth, with the Jeff Davis Legion, and two guns. On the Twelfth, then, Stuart's Cavalry held the Catoctin range, and McClellan had advanced his right under Burnside to Frederick, his centre under Sumner to Urbana and Ijamsville, while his left, under Franklin, still dragged behind close to the Potomac. Burnside was in contact with Stuart's cavalry at Hagans; but Sumner and Franklin were at least twelve miles from an enemy while they camped at Urbana and Urbana and Barnesville. The next day, September 13th, Walker, McLaws and Jackson, completed the investment of Harpers Ferry. Halleck and Stanton were telegraphing McClellan with hot wires to save the army and material there. Frederick is twenty miles from Harpers Ferry. Stuart, on leaving Frederick, sent instructions to Fitz Lee to gain the enemy's rear and ascertain his force. For the purpose of delaying his advance and giving all time possible for the capture of Harpers Ferry, and subsequent c
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
the Shenandoah. General Jackson was directed to take charge of the movement, and the detached columns were ordered to be in position on Friday, the 12th. Longstreet, with eleven brigades, and Hill, with five, were ordered to take position at Boonsboro, where the rest of the army was ordered to join them after the reduction of Harpers Ferry. At day-light, on the 10th, his army moved, on the National road, from Frederick to Hagerstown. McClellan explains the tardiness of his movements, becauore, the investment of Harper's Ferry was complete. Escape was impossible. Rescue by McClellan was the only salvation. General Lee, with Longstreet and the reserve artillery, had in the meantime gone into camp at Hagerstown and D. H. Hill at Boonsboro. We left McClellan on the 9th occupying the ridges along the line of the Seneca. On the 10th he moved his centre some five miles further to Damascus and Clarksburgh, and his left to Poolesville and Barnesville where he came in contact with
Frederick (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
rg, and there requested me to repeat our conversation of the day to the latter. I did so at length. General Lee particularly required information as to the topography of the banks of the Potomac between Loudoun county, Virginia, and Frederick county, Maryland, and those about Harpers Ferry and Williamsport. After several hours the conversation ceased. Jackson sat bolt upright asleep. Lee sat straight, solemn, and stern, and at last said, as if in soliloquy: When I left Richmond, I tolls. Just before this point of time occurred one of those incidents which, unforeseen and astounding, change the conduct of campaigns and the fortunes of war. Western Maryland is traversed by the Catoctin range of mountains running through Frederick county from the Potomac to Pennsylvania. Parallel and about eight miles northwest runs the South Mountain, the extension through Maryland of the Blue Ridge, the dividing line between Frederick and Washington counties. From two miles and a half
Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
ghty-four years old, and had been bed-ridden for some time. She never saw a Confederate soldier, and probably no one of any kind. Her house was at the corner of Patrick street and the Town Creek bridge. The troops marched by there during a portion of the 10th of September. On that morning General Jackson and his staff rode into the town to the house of the Rev. Dr. Ross, the Presbyterian clergyman there, and paid a visit to Mrs. Ross, who was the daughter of Governor McDowell, of Lexington, Virginia, where Jackson lived, and whom he knew well. After the visit to Mrs. Ross, at the parsonage, which was next to the Presbyterian church, and not on the same street, nor near Mrs. Fritchie's house, he rode at the head of his staff by the Courthouse, down through the Mill alley, up to Patrick street some distance beyond the Fritchie house. He never passed it, and in all probability never saw it. It is needless to say that no such incident as that described by Whittier, could have occur
Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 102
across the Potomac at Berlin, and with two other brigades drove away the Federal cavalry pickets near the mouth of Monocacy, and crossed at White's Ford. During the night of the 4th and day of the 5th, Lee's whole army crossed at the same place, the cavalry, under Stuart, bringing up the rear. The infantry camped that night at the Three Springs, in Frederick county, nine miles from Frederick. The cavalry passedat once to the flank, and extended an impenetrable veil of pickets across Montgomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of Septemb
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