hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 390 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 278 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 256 2 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 188 0 Browse Search
H. B. McClellan 172 2 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 160 2 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 150 2 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 147 1 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 130 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 130 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 1,557 total hits in 256 results.

... 21 22 23 24 25 26
rmy of Virginia which was to cooperate with these converging columns in the general movement on the Capital of the Confederate States. Burnside's army occupied Roanoke Island and New Berne and seated itself on the flank of Richmond. Fremont moved up the Valley as far as Cross Keys where he met his checkmate from Jackson on the 9th of June. McClellan advanced up the Peninsula as far as Mechanicsville, three and a half miles from Richmond, and after seven days hard fighting, June 26th to July 1st, succeeded in changing his base to Harrison's Landing, on the James, thirty miles from Richmond—a hazardous and meritorious undertaking, when nothing better could be done; and Major-General John Pope had been first checked by Jackson at Cedar Run, August 9th, and then, with the consolidated armies of Burnside, Fremont, McClellan and his own, had been escorted back to the fortification on the south bank of the Potomac, from which McClellan had moved with such confidence and high expectation
October, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 102
tates that an organization should be formed for the purpose of perpetuating the comradeship and preserving the esprit of those four years of ordeal, and of collecting material for history; whereby the honor of our dead should be protected, and justice done by posterity to the aspirations, the motives, and the deeds of those who had fought and failed. A plan of such an organization was submitted to General Lee, but he did not think the time had arrived for such an action. But when, in October, 1870, all Christendom stood uncovered before that open grave, at Lexington, when the South bent over the bier of her great chief, and the heart of Virginia was wrung at her bereavement, a great concourse of citizens, and patriots, and veterans came together here, in Richmond, to do honor to his memory, and to give expression to the feelings that stirred the whole people. Then and there it was determined to carry out the intention which had been formulated the year before, and the Association
the Potomac and north of Washington on the Seventh-Street road, and to Tenalltown. The cavalry, under Pleasanton, was pushed along the river to watch the fords in the neighborhood of Poolesville. On the afternoon of September 4th, D. H. Hill sent Anderson's brigade to fire on the Federal trains across the Potomac at Berlin, and with two other brigades drove away the Federal cavalry pickets near the mouth of Monocacy, and crossed at White's Ford. During the night of the 4th and day of the 5th, Lee's whole army crossed at the same place, the cavalry, under Stuart, bringing up the rear. The infantry camped that night at the Three Springs, in Frederick county, nine miles from Frederick. The cavalry passedat once to the flank, and extended an impenetrable veil of pickets across Montgomery and Frederick counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was
k counties, from the Potomac to New Market, beyond the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was posted on the right with his advance at Poolesville; Hampton's at Hyattstown, and Fitz. Lee's at New Market; cavalry headquarters were established at Urbana, eight miles soutwest of Frederick, and in the rear of the centre of the line thus established. This was the position on the night of September 5th. On the 6th, Leemoved his infantry to Frederick, the cavalry retaining its line. On the same day McClellan moved out as far as Rockville, which brought him within fifteen miles of Stuart's pickets. By the 9th he had cautiously pushed out some eight or nine miles further, the right wing, under Burnside, occupying Brookville; the centre Middlebrook, and Franklin on the left Darnestown; while Couch was kept close on the Potomac at the mouth of Seneca. The position thus taken by Mc-Clellan was a defensive
mont moved up the Valley as far as Cross Keys where he met his checkmate from Jackson on the 9th of June. McClellan advanced up the Peninsula as far as Mechanicsville, three and a half miles from Richmond, and after seven days hard fighting, June 26th to July 1st, succeeded in changing his base to Harrison's Landing, on the James, thirty miles from Richmond—a hazardous and meritorious undertaking, when nothing better could be done; and Major-General John Pope had been first checked by Jacksolan held under his control for actual operations 115,102 effectives. During the same period Lee controlled 80,835 men. Yet on June 25th, 1862, MeClellan reported to Stanton, Secretary of War, that Lee's force was stated to be 200,000, and on June 26th he states that the secret service reports his force to be 180,000, which he does not consider excessive. Therefore, after the defeats around Richmond, and after the disasters of Second Manassas, McClelland believed and so reported that the tr
up in the entrenchments of Washington about 160,000 men. The army which he led was composed of the veterans of Jackson's Foot Cavalry, of Hill's Light Division, and of Longstreet's First corps, seasoned by the marches and tempered by the victories in the Valley, in the seven days battles, at Cedar Run and at Second Manassas, over Banks, Fremont, Shields, McClellan and Pope. Jackson's men had been marching and fighting from May 23rd to September 1st. The two Hill's and Longstreet's, from June 25th to the same date. The troops who were left after these campaigns were as hard and tough as troops ever have been, for the process of elimination had dropped out all the inferior materials. Jackson left the Waterloo bridge on the Rappahannock on the 25th of August, and no rations were issued to his people until they camped about Frederick on the 6th of September—twelve days afterwards. They had marched and fought during that time, subsisting on green corn, or such supplies as the men
... 21 22 23 24 25 26