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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e regiment to Houston, where he arrived on the evening of the next day. The 15th was spent in shoeing animals and drawing supplies. On the 17th the regiment left Houston with its own transportation and a brigade train, in all thirty-two wagons. The Colonel had resumed the command of the regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel Myers was while, with ordinary diligence, he should have reported at least ten days before. When the General understood that the regiment, stationed at eighty miles beyond Houston, received the order of march on the 14th of March, and, impeded by a long train of wagons, had ridden over two hundred and fifty miles in less than fourteen days,neral Debray's affirmative answer to General Magruder's enquiry whether his brigade could still be trusted, Debray's and Wood's regiments were ordered to march to Houston. That city, which, during the war, was the center of trade in Texas, supposed to contain an accumulation of goods and money, both public and private, was threate
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
unexpectedly as they had landed, and disappeared from the coast of Texas. It was soon ascertained that their landing was a feint, intended to attract our attention to the coast, while General Banks, at New Orleans, was preparing to proceed to Alexandria, on Red River, with 40,000 men and a large fleet of gunboats and transports; thence, moving up the western bank of that river, which was to become his base of supplies, to reach Shreveport, where he was to meet General Steele, coming from Little Rock with 10,000 men; and with these combined forces, to penetrate into Texas by its northeastern frontier. The troops under Major-General Richard Taylor, who commanded in Western Louisiana, being inadequate to meet so imposing a force, General Magruder was ordered to dispatch all his available cavalry to join General Taylor. The order was promptly obeyed by General Magruder; but Debray's regiment, to the disappointment of its members, was not comprised among the troops ordered off. The C
Cane (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
. Soon it became apparent that Banks was preparing to move farther down the Red River. The greater part of our cavalry was ordered to proceed to a position on Cane River, a tributary of the Red, where it was believed that the crossing of that stream by a superior force could be prevented. General William Steele's division of cavalry, and Polignac's division of infantry, were directed to follow and harass the enemy. Monnette's Bluff is an elevated ground on the eastern bank of Cane River, which was supposed to be fordable only at that point. The front and right of the position selected for us is protected by a high and abrupt bank, and its left, exteinst our front the fire of his batteries, which was answered, by our artillery. Soon after our left was suddenly attacked by a detachment which had crossed the Cane River above our position and, well guided, had succeeded in clearing the swamps represented to us as impassable. Two successive attacks had been repelled, when the l
Hempstead, Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
and Crockett; and by the close of March it reached the lower Brazos, at Pittsville, near Richmond. Men and horses had recovered strength and spirits, and brigade manoeuvering was actively entered upon, when, to our mutual sorrow, Gould's regiment was ordered off, to be attached to another brigade. Gould's was replaced by McNeal's regiment, which being ordered on detached service on the Trinity River, never coalesced with the brigade. From Pittsville, the brigade moved to the vicinity of Hempstead, where it camped at a short distance from the infantry division of Major-General J. C. Walker who, after General Wharton's death, had also been assigned to the command of the cavalry corps. There, days of gloom and despondency came on us. The news of General Lee's surrender was received; and soldiers considering the war at an end, chafing under military restrictions, anxious to be with their families, left of their own accord, and soon, the army of Texas disintegrated. To the honor of
Caney (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
mber, 1863, the Federals effected an unexpected landing at the mouth of the Rio Grande, which was not defended. Thence, marching along the coast, they reached Indianola, which was in no condition for defence. General Magruder, suspecting an intention on the part of the enemy to move along the coast under the protection of their gunboats to the mouth of Brazos, and thence to penetrate into Galveston Island and attack the city in reverse, resolved to oppose their march at the mouth of the Caney River. All the available troops and levies of militia were concentrated at that point, and formed a small army of about six thousand men, in which Debray's, Gould's and Terrell's regiments were brigaded under Colonel Debray, the senior officer. Some weeks were passed in suspense, when the Federals took to their ships, as unexpectedly as they had landed, and disappeared from the coast of Texas. It was soon ascertained that their landing was a feint, intended to attract our attention to the
Pittsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d not decayed in the depots, where they had been accumulated by the operation of the Impressment Act. The brigade halted at Sabine Town, San Augustine, Carthage, Henderson and Crockett; and by the close of March it reached the lower Brazos, at Pittsville, near Richmond. Men and horses had recovered strength and spirits, and brigade manoeuvering was actively entered upon, when, to our mutual sorrow, Gould's regiment was ordered off, to be attached to another brigade. Gould's was replaced by McNeal's regiment, which being ordered on detached service on the Trinity River, never coalesced with the brigade. From Pittsville, the brigade moved to the vicinity of Hempstead, where it camped at a short distance from the infantry division of Major-General J. C. Walker who, after General Wharton's death, had also been assigned to the command of the cavalry corps. There, days of gloom and despondency came on us. The news of General Lee's surrender was received; and soldiers considering the
San Augustine (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
age, malarial fevers and camp diseases, the absence of medical stores, and worn out clothing and blankets caused much suffering and misery, nearly destroying the efficiency of the brigade. At last, by the close of November, the welcome order was received to return to Texas, by slow marches, consuming such commissary's and quartermaster's stores as had not decayed in the depots, where they had been accumulated by the operation of the Impressment Act. The brigade halted at Sabine Town, San Augustine, Carthage, Henderson and Crockett; and by the close of March it reached the lower Brazos, at Pittsville, near Richmond. Men and horses had recovered strength and spirits, and brigade manoeuvering was actively entered upon, when, to our mutual sorrow, Gould's regiment was ordered off, to be attached to another brigade. Gould's was replaced by McNeal's regiment, which being ordered on detached service on the Trinity River, never coalesced with the brigade. From Pittsville, the brigade m
Brazos River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
A sketch of Debray's twenty-sixth regiment of Texas cavalry. Paper no. 2—Conclusion. By General X. B. Debray. In November, 1863, the Federals effected an unexpected landing at the mouth of the Rio Grande, which was not defended. Thence, marching along the coast, they reached Indianola, which was in no condition for defence. General Magruder, suspecting an intention on the part of the enemy to move along the coast under the protection of their gunboats to the mouth of Brazos, and thence to penetrate into Galveston Island and attack the city in reverse, resolved to oppose their march at the mouth of the Caney River. All the available troops and levies of militia were concentrated at that point, and formed a small army of about six thousand men, in which Debray's, Gould's and Terrell's regiments were brigaded under Colonel Debray, the senior officer. Some weeks were passed in suspense, when the Federals took to their ships, as unexpectedly as they had landed, and disappeared f
Moreauville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
so as to bar the road, and compel the enemy to deploy, and show his strength. Banks' whole army was at hand. Then, an artillery duel began, in which over fifty guns took part. The witnesses of that engagement have, probably, not forgotten the protracted rumbling noise produced by the echoing of the reports of artillery along the skirt of timber extending in our rear. As the enemy was seen endeavoring to turn our left, we gave way, and hastened to the heights that overlook the town of Moreauville, on Yellow Bayou. On the next morning, the enemy appeared, but was not suffered to tarry in the town and indulge in his wonted acts of incendiarism. Following on General Bank's steps, on the 17th of May, we reached Norwood's plantation, about three miles distant from Atchafalaya, and deployed into line to attack his rear. But the enemy, turning against us, and massing his forces against our left, on the road, to allow his long train of wagons to defile on the pontoon bridge thrown ov
Logansport (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
the same day the regiment pushed on twenty miles farther, to the town of Manny. The men furloughed at the start had nearly all rejoined, and the regiment numbered four hundred and fifty men in the saddle, besides extra duty men, the train guard, the sick and those whose horses were disabled. During the night a courier from General Taylor's headquarters passed the camp, bearing orders to the regiments that had not yet crossed the Sabine to continue on its western side, and to cross it at Logansport. No intelligence was given of the movements of the enemy, whose proximity was not suspected. On the 2d of April, at daybreak, the march was resumed in the expectation of reaching Pleasant Hill by noon. Here an incident occurred, which will be mentioned as being characteristic of Debray's regiment. A Major on General Taylor's staff, an old West Pointer, whose name is not now remembered, visited the camp in the evening; on the next morning he started from Manny after the regiment had p
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