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Lee. memoranda of Dahlgren, as published in the Richmond Examiner, April 1, 1864, and referred to in preceding note of General Lee. Pleasonton will govern details. Will have details from other commands, (four thousand). Michigan men have started. Colonel I. H. Devereux has torpedoes. Hanover Junction (B. T. Johnson). Maryland Line. (Here follows a statement of the composition and numbers of Johnson's Command.) Chapin's Farm—seven miles below Richmond. One brigade (Hunton's relieved Wise sent to Charleston). River can be forded half a mile above the city. No works on south side. Hospitals near them. River fordable. Canal can be crossed. Fifty men to remain on north bank, and keep in communication if possible. To destroy mills, canal, and burn everything of value to the rebels. Seize any large ferry boats, and note all crossings, in case we have to return that way. Keep us posted of any important movement of the rebels, and as we approach the city
B. T. Johnson (search for this): chapter 39
n of any kind. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Fitzhugh Lee. memoranda of Dahlgren, as published in the Richmond Examiner, April 1, 1864, and referred to in preceding note of General Lee. Pleasonton will govern details. Will have details from other commands, (four thousand). Michigan men have started. Colonel I. H. Devereux has torpedoes. Hanover Junction (B. T. Johnson). Maryland Line. (Here follows a statement of the composition and numbers of Johnson's Command.) Chapin's Farm—seven miles below Richmond. One brigade (Hunton's relieved Wise sent to Charleston). River can be forded half a mile above the city. No works on south side. Hospitals near them. River fordable. Canal can be crossed. Fifty men to remain on north bank, and keep in communication if possible. To destroy mills, canal, and burn everything of value to the rebels. Seize any large ferry boats, and note all crossings, in case we have to return that way. Ke
Bradley Johnson (search for this): chapter 39
that I shall make, I write to suggest some considerations which have occurred to me. In the first place, my observations convinced me that the enemy could have taken Richmond, and in all probability would have done so, but for the fact that Colonel Johnson intercepted a dispatch from Dahlgren to Kilpatrick, asking what hour the latter had fixed for an attack on the city, so that both attacks might be simultaneous. Kilpatrick had said on his retreat that with Butler's force he could and would arms, rations and clothing were scattered about in confusion. Kilpatrick immediately moved his command off at a gallop, leaving one wagon with horses hitched to it, and one caisson full of ammunition. These were taken possession of by Colonel Bradley Johnson, who came up to that point in the morning from the direction of Meadow Bridge. He also picked up a good many prisoners, whose horses had been captured in the night attack, and who were cut off from their command owing to the extreme dar
Bradley T. Johnson (search for this): chapter 39
himself well, and gave assistance; while the artillery behaved admirably. I cannot close my report without expressing my appreciation of the conduct of Colonel Bradley T. Johnson and his gallant command. With a mere handful of men he met the enemy at Beaver Dam, and never lost sight of him until he had passed Tunstall's Station,sition to dispute his passage, he returned to Yorktown, and placing his cavalry on steamers, he transported them safely but ingloriously to Washington. Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, with a small body of cavalry, co-operated with me during these movements against the enemy, and rendered most efficient service. The following extradetails. Will have details from other commands, (four thousand). Michigan men have started. Colonel I. H. Devereux has torpedoes. Hanover Junction (B. T. Johnson). Maryland Line. (Here follows a statement of the composition and numbers of Johnson's Command.) Chapin's Farm—seven miles below Richmond. One brigade
Hilary P. Jones (search for this): chapter 39
d in a house about one mile from our camp, and on the 29th day of February, 1864, (the day of the month is impressed on my mind as significant of leap year). On that day a portion of Dahlgren's command surrounded the house and captured the whole of our party. The first intimation we had of any of the enemy being near us was the Yankee cavalry on their horses, pointing their pistols at the windows. They then dismounted, came in, and took us all prisoners. I recollect of our party Colonel Hilary P. Jones (now teaching at an academy in Hanover county), Captain David Watson, Captain Dement, of Maryland, and there were some others whose names I have forgotten. At the time of our capture Colonel Dahlgren had about six hundred cavalry under his command. As soon as we were captured we were mounted and carried off by the enemy. Towards evening a light rain set in and the night was very dark. Early in the night all the officers who had been captured made their escape except Captain
John William Jones (search for this): chapter 39
The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. Compiled byJ. Wm. Jones. We have several times expressed our purpose to publish a full account of this celebrated raid, together with incontrovertible proofs that the infamous Dahlgren Papers were not (as charged by Northern writers) a Rebel forgery, but were actually found on the person of Colonel Dahlgren. We have delayed this publication from time to time for various reasons, chief among which was a desire to secure a paper prepared for Honom General J. A. Early, in transmitting a photograph copy to our office, makes this matter so clear that we insert it, although not intended for publication: Letter from General J. A. Early. Lynchburg, February 24th, 1879. Rev. John William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society Dear sir,—I send you the copy of Dahlgren's address which Mr. McDaniel gave me for the Society. You will see that the h is very distinct in this copy. The address seems to have been written
Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 39
Richmond and make an attack at the same time Kilpatrick was to make an attack on the Brooke pike, enwith Kilpatrick. Dahlgren reasoned that General Kilpatrick might make a stand near the city and at us again, but, by good fortune, got in with Kilpatrick's forces and escaped. We were not so fortun the result are to be entertained. But if Kilpatrick will not risk another attack, there are but paid off, and prepared to march last night. Kilpatrick receiving marching orders. Three days ration was prevented from forming a junction with Kilpatrick by the interposition of my command between ting Adjutant-General. When the attack on Kilpatrick was made, Dahlgren, who had been repulsed bytter the execration of all honorable men. Kilpatrick having recruited at Yorktown, moved out, as ommand was detached from the main body under Kilpatrick, with the intention, it was presumed, of cro the expectation of finding and uniting with Kilpatrick in Richmond. The latter, however, had left [30 more...]
, twenty-five; Captain Todd, Home Guards, nine; King & Queen Cavalry, twenty-eight. Respectfully,the ground, stationed the men, and then sent to King & Queen Courthouse for Captain Fox. J. E. B. Virginia cavalry, with some of his men, was at King & Queen Courthouse and sent for him to join me,d to retreat through Hanover, King William, and King & Queen counties. I was carried along with thik—that divided the counties of King William and King & Queen—we found a boat sunken, and when we attarried to Richmond. I remained several days in King & Queen county. I was ragged and dirty and broward W. Halbach, was living at Stevensville, in King & Queen county, Virginia. I had already been eur force determined to go down the road towards King & Queen Courthouse, and barricade it. But, a the lieutenant, and several other gentlemen of King & Queen county. We walked into the woods aboutead of one of them, attempted to return through King & Queen county, but was killed, as far as I kno[6 more...]<
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 39
that there was no alarm, and we passed into General Lee's lines and left the gate open for the main service. Endorsements. headquarters Lee's cavalry division, March 7th, 1864. Respected in the absence of intermediate commander. Fitz. Lee, Major-General. headquarters cavalry corpw we will introduce as our next witness General Fitzhugh Lee (at present, the distinguished Governorell. We give in full a letter written by General Lee to the Historical Magazine, New York, and p for its own sake. February, 1864, found General Lee's army wintering along the line of the Rapirew after it, as was intended, what cavalry General Lee had at that time with his army. Kilpatri 1864, and referred to in preceding note of General Lee. Pleasonton will govern details. Willbe killed on the spot. Letter from General Fitzhugh Lee to Adjutant-General Cooper, enclosing Ceutenant Pollard delivered the papers to General Fitz. Lee, who carried them to President Davis. [14 more...]
ng to his report, chose the ground, stationed the men, and then sent to King & Queen Courthouse for Captain Fox. J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. headquarters, 5th April, 1864. Respectfully forwarded for information of the Department. R. E Lee, General. Letter from Lieutenant Pollard. Company H, Ninth Virginia cavalry April 9th, 1864. General,—I have the honor to report, in reply to your order of March 19th, received to-day, that early on the morning of——I got information d find out the position of the enemy and they surrendered without showing fight. I have the honor to be, General, Your obedient servant, James Pollard, First Lieut. Commanding Co. H, Ninth Va. Cavalry. Endorsements. headquarters Lee's cavalry division, 12th April, 1864. Respectfully forwarded. Fitz. Lee, Major-General Commanding. headquarters cavalry corps, Army of Northern Virginia, April 13, 1864. Respectfully forwarded. To Lieutenant Pollard's skilful disposit<
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