hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 222 0 Browse Search
Maxey Gregg 202 2 Browse Search
Ulric Dahlgren 182 6 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 162 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 148 8 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 142 0 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 141 5 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 133 1 Browse Search
D. H. Chamberlain 128 0 Browse Search
R. H. Anderson 124 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 803 total hits in 194 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
Edward W. Halbach (search for this): chapter 39
s every way worthy of credence. We refer to Mr. Edward W. Halbach, whose sworn affidavit was published years a statement in full as follows: Statement of Edward W. Halbach in relation to the Dahlgren papers. In the summer of 1863, I, Edward W. Halbach, was living at Stevensville, in King & Queen county, Virginia. I had alrehen Littlepage pulled out a cigar-case, and said: Mr. Halbach, will you have a cigar? No, said 1; but where dird, which was forwarded to me, he asked: Who is Captain Halbach? I replied, for myself, that I was nothing mor We had hoped to add to the above statement of Mr. Halbach that of Rev. Richard Hugh Bagby, D. D., who commawhich we will show to be complete and perfect. Mr. Halbach's sworn statement shows beyond all cavil that he he manner described in the minute statement of Edward W. Halbach, of Stevensville, in that county. His statemeapers. 2. They were turned over by Littlepage to Halbach, and were read by Dr. Bagby and others before there
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 39
nd, as one of his officers told me in Libby, demoralized run, with Hampton on his rear. Dahlgren waited till dark, and then came out and f following official reports: From General report of Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton. In the beginning of the spring of 1864 the enemy mr use of them you think best. I am, very respectfully yours, Wade Hampton, Major-General. Major General Stuart, Commanding Cavalry. T as emphatically as I can, his promotion. Captain Lowndes, Lieutenant Hampton and Dr. Taylor, of my staff, accompanied me, and rendered me ssistance. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully yours, Wade Hampton, Major-General. Major McClellan, Acting Adjutant-General. W: The Major-General Commanding begs leave to tender to Major-General Hampton and his command his sincere thanks for their cooperation ine was stampeded and completely routed, leaving in the hands of General Hampton many prisoners and horses. By command of Major-General Elze
el C. E. Lightfoot, commanding the light artillery, to repair to Camp Lee by daylight, with Captain Hankins's and Captain Rives's batteries, and to send one section of Thornton's battery to the vicint horses wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot had also, with commendable promptitude, ordered Hankins's battery to the intersection of the Intermediate Line and the Mordecai Mill road. At the sameharge, as per list of casualties enclosed. A demonstration was made by the enemy against Captain Hankins's position on the Mill road, but it was repulsed, and in the artillery duel that ensued, CaCaptain Hankins several times drove the gunners of the enemy from their guns. Captain Rives's fire caused a large body of the enemy, massed between the Brooke turnpike and the Mill road, to seek shellery, was ordered to report to General Barton on the Mechanicsville road, and one section from Hankins's and one from Rives's batteries were sent to report to General Lee, before the fire of the ene
C. S. Harrison (search for this): chapter 39
nant-Colonel Joseph Howard had ordered Captain Rives to push forward one section of his artillery and engage them. This command Captain Rives executed, being supported by Company D, Tenth Virginia battalion, heavy artillery, commanded by Captain C. S. Harrison. After advancing some two hundred yards, the enemy's skirmishers, closing upon him, fired so rapidly and accurately, that he was obliged to retire to the shelter of the fortification, with the loss of two men wounded and eight horses wo, Company B, Twentieth Virginia battalion, heavy artillery, who charged the enemy who were in the house of Mr. J. A. Parker, from which they were immediately driven; and on the left by Company D, Tenth Virginia battalion, heavy artillery, Captain C. S. Harrison, commanding. Lieutenant Chaplain's party lost five men in the charge, as per list of casualties enclosed. A demonstration was made by the enemy against Captain Hankins's position on the Mill road, but it was repulsed, and in the artil
mation I had received of the movements of the enemy. As soon as I could learn what direction he had taken, I sent all the mounted men of the North Carolina cavalry brigade who were present, 253 from the First regiment and 53 from the Second, with Hart's battery, to Mount Carmel Church. On the morning of the 1st March I joined the command and moved to Hanover Junction. Not hearing of the enemy here, proceeded to Hughes Cross Roads, deeming that an important point, and one at which he would be h from a dead Yankee; but his teacher always discouraged any feelings of this kind in his pupils. Littlepage failed to secure the prize by not looking in the overcoat pockets, and the watch (for there was really one) was found afterwards by Lieutenant Hart. But in searching the pockets of the inner garments, Littlepage did find a cigar-case, a memorandum-box, etc. When the Yankees had been driven back and thrown into a panic by the suddenness of our fire and the darkness of the night, a Co
to avoid being captured with them in my possession, which, I was told, would result in the hanging of our little party. I have never given the information herein contained before, because I had hoped that it would be given to the public by others, and I give it now, because I regard it as a duty to do so. My own course, after the killing of Dahlgren, was as follows: I joined those who agreed to bury him decently in a coffin, and in compliance with a promise made to a scout by the name of Hogan, I prepared a neat little head-board with my own hands, to mark his grave. This was not put up, because the messenger from Mr. Davis for the body of Dahlgren arrived while we were taking it out of the ground where it had been hastily buried. We had hoped to add to the above statement of Mr. Halbach that of Rev. Richard Hugh Bagby, D. D., who commanded the Home Guard on the occasion, who was stationed within a few feet of Colonel Dahlgren when he was killed, and who told us (in the cours
B. F. Holstead (search for this): chapter 39
d, to seek shelter in the thick wood to the right of Brooke turnpike. The firing lasted about two hours, after which the enemy retreated towards the Meadow Bridge road. Later in the day, a small body of the enemy's cavalry made its appearance near the residence of Mr. J. P. Ballard, about three-fourths of a mile in front of one of my siege batteries on the Intermediate Line and Deep Run road, served by a detachment of twenty men of the Twentieth Virginia battalion, commanded by Second Lieutenant B. F. Holstead, of Company B, Twentieth Virginia battalion. After exchanging ten rounds, the enemy withdrew with no casualties on our side. In closing this report, I have the honor to express my gratification at the behavior both of the officers and men of this command; the artillery was handled exceedingly well, and the infantry responded with alacrity to every call made upon them. I had about five hundred men engaged between the Brooke pike and the Mill road and six pieces of artillery
Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 39
g an account of the treatment received when a prisoner, says: All this brutal punishment was inflicted upon us, according to the statement of the Confederate prison officials, on account of those papers said to have been found on the body of Colonel Dahlgren at the time he was killed. But the name of Colonel Dahlgren can never be injured by any slander or forgery that can be concocted by all the enemies of our country. His deeds speak for themselves. His career with Sigel, Burnside, Hooker, Meade and Kilpatrick, together with his exploits at Fredericksburg, Beverley Ford, Chambersburg and in front of Richmond, will live when the name of the last traitor in the land is forgotten. I pronounce those papers a base forgery, and will give some of my reasons for so doing. I was with the expedition in the capacity of signal officer, and was the only staff officer with him. I had charge of all the material for destroying bridges, blowing up locks, aqueducts, etc. I knew all his pl
Joseph Howard (search for this): chapter 39
-Mile road, and at the same time ordered the forces of Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Howard, commanding Second Division, Inner Line, and of Lieutenpike, and Intermediate Line by daylight Tuesday morning. Lieutenant-Colonel Howard being ordered at the same time to double his guards, post headquarters. While there, I received a dispatch from Lieutenant-Colonel Howard, stating that the enemy had appeared in his front and drihere, found out that upon the appearance of the enemy, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Howard had ordered Captain Rives to push forward one section d. At the same time sending him an infantry support from Lieutenant-Colonel Howard's command. Soon after my arrival the enemy opened uponnoyed our artillerists so much that, at the suggestion of Lieutenant-Colonel Howard, I ordered him and Lieutenant-Colonel Atkinson to detach ndsomely performed on the right by a volunteer force from Lieutenant-Colonel Howard's command, under First Lieutenant William M. Chaplain, Co
my withdrew with no casualties on our side. In closing this report, I have the honor to express my gratification at the behavior both of the officers and men of this command; the artillery was handled exceedingly well, and the infantry responded with alacrity to every call made upon them. I had about five hundred men engaged between the Brooke pike and the Mill road and six pieces of artillery. The enemy supposed to be between 3,000 and 3,500 men with five pieces of artillery. Lieutenant Hudgin, with four pieces of artillery, was ordered to report to General Barton on the Mechanicsville road, and one section from Hankins's and one from Rives's batteries were sent to report to General Lee, before the fire of the enemy on my front had ceased—they having left my command for the time, I have not traced their operations, though I have been informed that they were not elsewhere engaged. The loss of the enemy is not known, they being able, under cover of a dense fog, to carry awa
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...