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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Mountain, however, where General D. H. Hill's division was left by General Lee to oppose the passage of General McClellan's army until Jackson could capture Harper's Ferry and come to Lee's assistance, General Anderson's command, in common with the other brigades of the divison, was subjected to one of the most trying ordeals ofceedingly anxious to force the passage of this mountain gap and by overtaking Lee and bringing on a decisive engagement,, relieve their beleaguered friends at Harper's Ferry, who numbered more than eleven thousand men, with thirteen thousand small arms and seventy-three cannon. But the heroic defenders of the pass, though but a h marching and fighting, took position in the centre of the line on the left of the Boonsboro road. Longstreet was on the right, and Jackson, who had captured Harper's Ferry with its little army and all its supplies, occupied the extreme left. McClellan and Lee at last stood face to face. General McClellan said, before the Com
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
most gallant and efficient officer. In the last of these engagements, the terrible work at Malvern Hill, General Anderson, while leading a desperate charge, received a wound in the hand In August the army commenced the first invasion of the enemy's territory after having fought several battles concluding with the second battle of Manassas, where Pope was ruined and a splendid victory won; but General Anderson's brigade was not engaged in any serious fight previous to the actual invasion of Maryland. At the battle of South Mountain, however, where General D. H. Hill's division was left by General Lee to oppose the passage of General McClellan's army until Jackson could capture Harper's Ferry and come to Lee's assistance, General Anderson's command, in common with the other brigades of the divison, was subjected to one of the most trying ordeals of the war. That one division, alone and unaided (until late in the afternoon when Longstreet arrived) stood as firm as the everlasting hills
Fort Chadbourne (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
xpiration of which time he was detailed to assist Lieutenant Parke, of the engineers, in surveying a route for a railroad in California. When this duty was completed, he was ordered to his regiment, the Second Dragoons, then stationed at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, and there was associated with a group of officers who afterwards became distinguished generals on both sides in the war between the States. Having been promoted to a first lieutenancy, and the regiment having been ordered, in the fall of 1855, to Fort Riley, Kansas, he commanded his company in the march across the plains to the latter fort from Fort Chadbourne. While stationed at Fort Riley, in the spring of 1856, the Kansas prelude to the great tragedy, in which he was destined to lose his life, began to stir the passions of the people of both sections of the country, and he had an opportunity of seeing and reflecting upon the inevitable tendency of events, as illustrated by the career of a notorious horse-thief and murdere
Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ons of the country, and he had an opportunity of seeing and reflecting upon the inevitable tendency of events, as illustrated by the career of a notorious horse-thief and murderer, who was afterwards canonized as a sainted hero and martyr. It is natural to suppose that the experience thus acquired was not without its effect upon one who was of an ardent temperament, anxiously observant of the drift of public affairs, and intensely Southern in his feelings. About this time another saint in Utah was also engaged in defying the laws (as his successors still are), and an expedition under the command of Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to that Territory to vindicate the supremacy of the Federal authority and the rights of civilization and decency. The Second Dragoons was a part of the force detailed for this service, and Lieutenant Anderson served on the expedition as adjutant of the regiment. Remaining there until the fall of 1859, he was detached and sent to Kentucky, where, on the 8
Orange County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
hat Commonwealth in which the people no longer care to preserve and perpetuate the memory of those who have served it with distinction and passed from earth. But no one whom I ever knew would have been less willing to enjoy unmerited honors in life or after death—for no one disdained shame and falsehood more than he. Truth and manliness were his distinguishing characteristics, and to them in whomsoever found he was ever ready to do reverence. Near the town of Hillsboroa, in the county of Orange, which has been the residence of as many, if not more, distinguished citizens than any county in the State, George Burgwyn Anderson was born on the 12th day of April, in the year 1831, and was the oldest son of the late William E. Anderson, Esq., and his wife, Eliza Burgwyn. In his early years he exhibited the intellectual and moral traits which, in their full development, adorned his manhood, and attracted the admiration, and commanded the respect of all who knew him. A better illustration
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ally well informed man of the world, tempered his ambition to excel in a knowledge of the textbooks; and as he devoted much of his time to general reading, and a liberal share of it to pleasant society, his number, when he graduated in 1852, was nine; but this was in a class of forty-one graduates, and was therefore a high standing, and entitled him to select the arm of the service which he preferred. He selected the Dragoons, and rendered his first service at the cavalry school at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he remained for six months, at the expiration of which time he was detailed to assist Lieutenant Parke, of the engineers, in surveying a route for a railroad in California. When this duty was completed, he was ordered to his regiment, the Second Dragoons, then stationed at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, and there was associated with a group of officers who afterwards became distinguished generals on both sides in the war between the States. Having been promoted to a first lieutenan
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ife and services of some one distinguished North Carolina soldier of the late war, I hailed your acter, as true a man, and as devoted a son of North Carolina as any who ever lived. And I esteem myselat meant and how dire would be the need of North Carolina for all her true sons, and especially thoslant and gifted nephew, that heroic son of North Carolina found his last resting place in the soil hg sons in Christendom—were brought back to North Carolina and now lie beneath a memorial shaft at Wiing motive of his whole life, he turned to North Carolina and reverently laid it at her feet. It wad soldiers and statesmen. Look around for North Carolina's contribution. It is not there. Go to st, not even a portrait to remind you that North Carolina ever produced one man that she thought wor—a sentiment alike jealous of the honor of North Carolina, and tenderly grateful to her heroic sons. the most gifted of men, and the people of North Carolina would have a juster estimate of the life a[1 more...]<
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
pleasant society, his number, when he graduated in 1852, was nine; but this was in a class of forty-one graduates, and was therefore a high standing, and entitled him to select the arm of the service which he preferred. He selected the Dragoons, and rendered his first service at the cavalry school at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he remained for six months, at the expiration of which time he was detailed to assist Lieutenant Parke, of the engineers, in surveying a route for a railroad in California. When this duty was completed, he was ordered to his regiment, the Second Dragoons, then stationed at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, and there was associated with a group of officers who afterwards became distinguished generals on both sides in the war between the States. Having been promoted to a first lieutenancy, and the regiment having been ordered, in the fall of 1855, to Fort Riley, Kansas, he commanded his company in the march across the plains to the latter fort from Fort Chadbourne. W
Flodden Field (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
en in the ranks, eighty-six were killed and three hundred and seventy-six were wounded, leaving only fifty-eight out of the five hundred and twenty unhurt—a record which is the best evidence of the perfect discipline and splendid courage exhibited by that glorious regiment in its first hard fight with the enemy. During this engagement Colonel Anderson seized the flag of the Twenty-seventh Georgia regiment and dashed forward holding it aloft. His men seeing it as the anxious squires on Flodden Field saw The stainless Tunstall's banner white, rushed madly after him, And such a yell was there Of sudden and portentous birth, As if men fought upon the earth And fiends in upper air. Before their resistless sweep the stubborn foe reeled and fled, and the colors which Anderson bore were planted on their breastworks. Such men were worthy of being commanded, as they were, by the bravest of the brave, and the cordial thanks and commendation of a division commander, who was not give
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
force assailing them, and though subjected to very heavy losses from first to last, yielded not an inch of their ground until nightfall, and then, their purpose being accomplished, retired unmolested to take their place in the ranks of death at Sharpsburg. The historic battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam—this great battle as General Lee called it in his report—occurred on the 17th day of September, three days after the fight at South Mountain, and D. H. Hill's division, with Anderson's brigade othat one of the truest and bravest men that ever lived had the wound of death upon him. He was taken into Virginia, and when the army fell back he was brought—with his brother and aide-de-camp, Captain Walker Anderson who was also wounded at Sharpsburg, and was afterwards killed at the Wilderness—to Raleigh, arriving in the latter part of September. His wound was a most painful one, and he suffered great agony for two weeks after reaching here. Finally amputation was decided upon, but it w
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