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Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
c, move towards Harper's Ferry, and, seizing the Loudoun Heights, to shut up the eastern angle formed by the Shenandoah and the Potomac. Longstreet was sent to Hagerstown to look after some supplies and reported movements of troops from Pennsylvania, while D. H. Hill was left at Boonesboroa to be ready to support Stuart's cavalry's character and movements, Lee believed he would have ample time for the reduction of Harper's Ferry and the reunion of his divided army in the neighborhood of Hagerstown before McClellan would be ready to cross the mountain. Consequently D. H. Hill and Stuart were expected to delay McClellan's march until the operations at Harpo him came through the lines and informed Stuart, who then understood the cause of the Federal activity. Stuart sent in turn, the information to General Lee at Hagerstown. Lee received it some time during the night of the 13th, and at once ordered Longstreet back to Boonesboroa to support Hill. General Longstreet says that he u
Antietam Creek (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
d on the morning of the 17th after the battle had been some hours in progress. A. P. Hill was sent for on the night of the 16th, and, leaving early on the 17th, reached the field, as we shall see, in time to snatch victory from Burnside's corps. Thus, Lee, by great effort, concentrated all his army in time for participation in the battle. This concentration was, however, effected by exhausting marches and at the price of much straggling. On the 16th the two armies were separated by Antietam creek, Lee occupying the hills west of the stream, which offered a fine commanding position. His right rested at the Burnside bridge-the lower one of the three which were used in the battle. His right centre faced towards the bridge on the turnpike leading from Sharpsburg to Boonesboroa. His left centre and left extended northward, gradually receding from the creek and finally resting upon the Hagerstown turnpike some two miles or so north of Sharpsburg. Cavalry continued the line thence t
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
my will be drawn from Maryland. On the 13th Halleck says: Until you know more certainly the enemy's forces south of the Potomac you are wrong in thus uncovering the capital. I am of the opinion that the enemy will send a small column towards Pennsylvania and draw your forces in that direction, then suddenly move on Washington with the forces south of the Potomac, and those he might cross over. This was the very day on which McClellan obtained the lost dispatch. On the 14th Halleck says: I fPotomac, move towards Harper's Ferry, and, seizing the Loudoun Heights, to shut up the eastern angle formed by the Shenandoah and the Potomac. Longstreet was sent to Hagerstown to look after some supplies and reported movements of troops from Pennsylvania, while D. H. Hill was left at Boonesboroa to be ready to support Stuart's cavalry and to guard the mountainpass which led to McLaws's rear until Harper's Ferry should fall. It was not General Lee's original intention to dispute the passage o
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 4
its severe and unfair criticism of General Lee's strategy. General Longstreet leads us to infer that he prevailed over Lee's hesitancy to go into Maryland at all by reminding him of his (Longstreet's) experiences in Mexico, where, on several occasions, we had to live two or three days on green corn. As Jackson's corps certainly, and Longstreet's probably, had to live on green corn for some days before the second battle of Manassas, it was hardly necessary in General Longstreet to recur to Mexican experiences in order to overcome the hesitancy of Lee. But however much Lee yielded to the influence of Longstreet in crossing the Potomac, it is evident from General Longstreet's article that Lee unfortunately refused to be guided by the wisdom of his lieutenant when he had once entered upon the campaign. General Longstreet thinks that Lee ought not to have attempted the reduction of Harper's Ferry. Longstreet is careful to throw all blame for this movement off his own shoulders, for he
McDonough (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
show what might have been expected had not an untoward accident prevented the execution of his original plans? We regret the tone in which General Longstreet speaks of Virginians, of the great leader under whom he served, of the gallant colleagues by whose side he fought. Virginians can never forget on how many of their fields General Longstreet won imperishable laurels. They can never forget the true, brave, skilful soldier who shed his blood upon Virginian soil. They will ever gladly turn away from his carping criticisms to recall the leader who, in conjunction with A. P. Hill, struck so splendidly at Frazier's Farm, whose ability was so conspicuous in seconding Jackson at Second Manassas, whose name is indissolubly associated with Sharpsburg, Marye's Hill, the Wilderness, and many other noted fields; who was ever ready to strike great blows alongside of his Virginian colleagues and under the leadership of his great Virginian commander. McDonough, Maryland, July 26, 1886.
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
aws on the 14th. Hence Lee withdrew towards Sharpsburg next morning. While this movement was in pr near Harper's Ferry, and then moved towards Sharpsburg, which he did not reach until about 9 o'clocran foul of some of Longstreet's trains near Sharpsburg and did some damage. The road by which thestroops about Harper's Ferry were recalled to Sharpsburg by orders suitable to the urgency of the occlker was close behind him. These two reached Sharpsburg during the forenoon of the 16th. McLaws andards the bridge on the turnpike leading from Sharpsburg to Boonesboroa. His left centre and left exstown turnpike some two miles or so north of Sharpsburg. Cavalry continued the line thence to the Pading event of the day on the field north of Sharpsburg. It does not, however, deserve this distincfederate army was better off at the close of Sharpsburg than the Federal army, and it is far more li, whose name is indissolubly associated with Sharpsburg, Marye's Hill, the Wilderness, and many othe[3 more...]
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ght not to have attempted the reduction of Harper's Ferry. Longstreet is careful to throw all blames the Virginia papers made him the hero of Harper's Ferry, although the greater danger was with McLan he entered Maryland that the garrison at Harper's Ferry would leave the place and escape to the Nowould have ample time for the reduction of Harper's Ferry and the reunion of his divided army in theit should be reunited after the capture of Harper's Ferry, fell into the hands of General McClellan e rear of McLaws, might raise the siege of Harper's Ferry, and perhaps destroy a portion of the trooolivar Heights, the southwestern suburb of Harper's Ferry. Thus Jackson was fully on time. McLaws,operate with Jackson's in the reduction of Harper's Ferry. Thus the capture of Maryland Heights wasaws and General Walker in the reduction of Harper's Ferry—all honor to them for what they did—but itevote all of his energies to the relief of Harper's Ferry and the crushing of that part of the Confe[28 more...]<
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 4
n. Review of General Longstreet by Colonel W. Allan. In the Century for June, 1886, General Longstreet has an article on the Maryland campaign of 1862, which is remarkable for its ill-natured allusions to General Jackson, as well as for its partial view of the campaign and its severe and unfair criticism of General Lee's strategy. General Longstreet leads us to infer that he prevailed over Lee's hesitancy to go into Maryland at all by reminding him of his (Longstreet's) experiences in Mexico, where, on several occasions, we had to live two or three days on green corn. As Jackson's corps certainly, and Longstreet's probably, had to live on green corn for some days before the second battle of Manassas, it was hardly necessary in General Longstreet to recur to Mexican experiences in order to overcome the hesitancy of Lee. But however much Lee yielded to the influence of Longstreet in crossing the Potomac, it is evident from General Longstreet's article that Lee unfortunately refus
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Ferry sixteen hours after McLaws, but reached the battle-field only five hours behind him. McLaws had, however, the night to contend with. The vigor of Hill's attack, with hungry and march worn men, is shown by the fact that he completely overthrew forces twice as numerous as his own. Though his force of from two thousand to three thousand five hundred men was too small to permit of an extended aggressive, his arrival was not less opportune to Lee than was that of Blucher to Wellington at Waterloo, nor was his action when on the field in any way inferior to that of the Prussian field marshal. The battle of Sharpsburg was a very bloody one, and a very exhausting one to the Confederate army. As General Longstreet says: Nearly one-fourth of Lee's men were killed and wounded, but they had met and defeated all the attempts of an army more than twice as numerous as themselves to drive them from their position. We think General Longstreet must have forgotten much of the battle when he
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
on made a wide, sweeping march around the Ferry, passing the Potomac at Williamsport, and moving from there on towards Martinsburg, and turning thence upon Harper's Ferry to make his attack by Bolivar Heights. McLaws made a hurried march to reach Me army left Frederick. Jackson, as General Longstreet states, was to make a sweeping march by way of Williamsport and Martinsburg, and, driving the Federal troops at the latter place towards Harper's Ferry, close all the avenues of escape in the anember 12th, was expected to be in possession of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and of such of the enemy as may be at Martinsburg. Jackson had by far the longest march to make to reach Harper's Ferry; it amounted to about fifty miles. He was at MaMartinsburg, according to orders, on the night of the 12th, and had driven the Federal troops from that place towards Harper's Ferry. About 11 o'clock on the morning of the 13th the head of his column came in sight of the enemy drawn up on Bolivar
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