hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert E. Lee 523 9 Browse Search
United States (United States) 340 0 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 254 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 216 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 195 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 182 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 170 0 Browse Search
Sedgwick 168 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 160 0 Browse Search
J. A. Early 149 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 141 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 47
headings of the chapters as follows: West Virginia Campaign, where Lee sacrificed his own reputation rather than to sacrifice his men or injure the reputation of others who were striking for the defence of the country as best they could—The South Coast Defences, where General Lee left the impress of his engineering skill, which aided materially in the heroic defence which afterwards followed—The Peninsula Campaign, which brought McClellan to the gates of Richmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victo
Outgeneralled (search for this): chapter 47
eral Lee left the impress of his engineering skill, which aided materially in the heroic defence which afterwards followed—The Peninsula Campaign, which brought McClellan to the gates of Richmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly p
us and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of orders on the part of General Longstreet—A Campaign of Strategy, gives the history of the Bristoe campaign, the Mine Run affair, and the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, brings out the marvellous :strategy by which Lee outgeneraled Grant at every point, and the ,heroic fighting by which the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Army of the Potomac wherever they met until after Cold Harbor, having had more men put hors du combat than Lee had, it was compelled to sit down to the siege of Petersburg, a position which it might have taken at first without firing a shot or losing a man— Early's Valley Campaign, gi
J. A. Early (search for this): chapter 47
Custis Lee said he never received, Mrs. Lee pronounced spurious, and we have had occasion several times to prove to be a forgery, from internal evidence as well as from the testimony of the family. 7. We are sorry to see also that, on page 338, the author copies an error, into which Jones, in his Reminiscences of Lee, was led, in attributing the incident of Gordon's men refusing to go forward unless General Lee would go to the rear to the tenth of May, 1864, instead of to the twelfth, the real day, as General Early, Colonel Venable, General Gordon, and others showed, and we have several times published in our papers. But let us say again that despite these blemishes the book is a valuable contribution to our Confederate war literature, and we cordially commend it as worthy of a place in every library. May our gallant friend, General Long, live to write other books, and our good friend, General Wright, be spared long to continue his valuable services to the War Records office.
secretary and confidential staff-officer of General Lee, and afterwards as Chief of Artillery of th the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the clearly the invaluable service rendered by General Lee as commander-in-chief of the Virginia forces a man—and the remainder of the memoirs of General Lee's military career are therefore the work ofpters as follows: West Virginia Campaign, where Lee sacrificed his own reputation rather than to sa Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boyf our lines, the retreat, and the surrender—General Lee as a soldier, gives the estimate of an ableoubt the propriety of padding the book with General Lee's official reports, which have been frequenpers] and Colonel Charles Marshall, who was General Lee's military secretary after General Long wen G. W. Custis Lee, at West Point, but which General Lee said, at the time, he never wrote, General [27 more...]<
Walter H. Taylor (search for this): chapter 47
r again, and, on the other hand, to deeply regret that the sad affliction of his blindness prevented his thorough study of the official records on both sides, so that he might have added to his exceedingly valuable work the full statement of relative numbers and able criticism of military movements of which General Long is so capable. But, then, had he been spared this sore affliction—this thorn in the flesh—in the loss of his vision, he might have been (like Venable, and Marshall, and W. H. Taylor, of Lee's staff, and others of our ablest soldiers) so absorbed in active business that we should have lost these invaluable Recollections of Lee, as a gallant and accomplished soldier saw him. The genealogy of the Lee family, and the account of the early youth and opening manhood of Lee, are very interesting, and contain some new matter in the reminiscences of cotemporaries of the boy, the cadet, the skillful young engineer officer, and the account of his marriage to Mary Custis, and
Charles Marshall (search for this): chapter 47
ong is so capable. But, then, had he been spared this sore affliction—this thorn in the flesh—in the loss of his vision, he might have been (like Venable, and Marshall, and W. H. Taylor, of Lee's staff, and others of our ablest soldiers) so absorbed in active business that we should have lost these invaluable Recollections of L headquarter wagons on the retreat, but duplicates of many of them were preserved, [we have published a number in Southern Historical Society papers] and Colonel Charles Marshall, who was General Lee's military secretary after General Long went to command the artillery of the second corps, has fortunately preserved the original draught of General Lee's report. Colonel Marshall having been selected by the Lee family to write the full and authorized memoir of General Lee, has in his possession a number of documents of priceless value, besides all of the material which General Lee himself collected for his proposed history of his campaigns and we record here
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 47
f General Longstreet—A Campaign of Strategy, gives the history of the Bristoe campaign, the Mine Run affair, and the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, brings out the marvellous :strategy by which Lee outgeneraled Grant at every point, and the ,heroic fighting by which the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Army of the Potomac wherever they met until after Cold Harbor, having had more men put hors du combat than Lee had, it was compelled to sit down to the sly led against Sheridan's overwhelming masses—The Siege of Petersburg and The Siege Continued, give accounts of operations during the summer, autumn and winter along the long line which Lee and his mere handful of ragged veterans defended against Grant's overwhelming numbers and resources—From Petersburg to Appomattox, tells the sad story of the breaking of our lines, the retreat, and the surrender—General Lee as a soldier, gives the estimate of an able soldier of his great chief, and concl
llous :strategy by which Lee outgeneraled Grant at every point, and the ,heroic fighting by which the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Army of the Potomac wherever they met until after Cold Harbor, having had more men put hors du combat than Lee had, it was compelled to sit down to the siege of Petersburg, a position which it might have taken at first without firing a shot or losing a man— Early's Valley Campaign, gives a brief account of the forlorn hope which was so ably led against Sheridan's overwhelming masses—The Siege of Petersburg and The Siege Continued, give accounts of operations during the summer, autumn and winter along the long line which Lee and his mere handful of ragged veterans defended against Grant's overwhelming numbers and resources—From Petersburg to Appomattox, tells the sad story of the breaking of our lines, the retreat, and the surrender—General Lee as a soldier, gives the estimate of an able soldier of his great chief, and concludes General Long's pa
G. W. Custis (search for this): chapter 47
of General Lee, has in his possession a number of documents of priceless value, besides all of the material which General Lee himself collected for his proposed history of his campaigns and we record here the earnest hope that the day may not be distant when his book shall be given to the world. 6. We are surprised to see introduced at page 464-465, the famous letter which was published at the North during the war, and purported to be a letter from General Lee at Arlington to his son, G. W. Custis Lee, at West Point, but which General Lee said, at the time, he never wrote, General Custis Lee said he never received, Mrs. Lee pronounced spurious, and we have had occasion several times to prove to be a forgery, from internal evidence as well as from the testimony of the family. 7. We are sorry to see also that, on page 338, the author copies an error, into which Jones, in his Reminiscences of Lee, was led, in attributing the incident of Gordon's men refusing to go forward unless G
1 2 3 4 5