hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert E. Lee 523 9 Browse Search
United States (United States) 340 0 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 254 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 216 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 195 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 182 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 170 0 Browse Search
Sedgwick 168 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 160 0 Browse Search
J. A. Early 149 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 141 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ichmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of orders on the part of General Longst
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 47
. Wm. Jones. Memoirs of Robert E. Lee: His Military and Personal History. Embracing a large amount of Information Hitherto Unpublished. By A. L. Long, formerly Military Secretary to General Lee, afterwards Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery Second Corps Army of Northern Virginia. Together with incidents relating to his private life subsequent to the War, collected and edited with the assistance of Marcus J. Wright, formerly Brigadier-General Army of Tennessee, and Agent of the United States for the Collection of Confederate Records. New York, Philadelphia and Washington: J. M. Stoddart & Co. 1886. We never fail to seek and to read with interest any and everything which can shed light on the life and character of General R. E. Lee, and hail with peculiar delight any new contribution to our knowledge of this superb soldier and peerless Christian gentleman. Knowing well the ability of the gallant and accomplished soldier, General A. L. Long, and his peculiar qualification
Arlington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
uth and opening manhood of Lee, are very interesting, and contain some new matter in the reminiscences of cotemporaries of the boy, the cadet, the skillful young engineer officer, and the account of his marriage to Mary Custis, and home life at Arlington. The sketch of the career of Captain Lee in the Mexican war, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, be the day may not be distant when his book shall be given to the world. 6. We are surprised to see introduced at page 464-465, the famous letter which was published at the North during the war, and purported to be a letter from General Lee at Arlington to his son, G. W. Custis Lee, at West Point, but which General Lee said, at the time, he never wrote, General Custis Lee said he never received, Mrs. Lee pronounced spurious, and we have had occasion several times to prove to be a forgery, from
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
n at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of orders on the part of General Longstreet—A Campaign of Strategy, gives the histor
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
he defence of the country as best they could—The South Coast Defences, where General Lee left the impress of his engineering skill, which aided materially in the heroic defence which afterwards followed—The Peninsula Campaign, which brought McClellan to the gates of Richmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign,
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
brought McClellan to the gates of Richmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
neral R. E. Lee. A review by J. Wm. Jones. Memoirs of Robert E. Lee: His Military and Personal History. Embracing a large amount of Information Hitherto Unpublished. By A. L. Long, formerly Military Secretary to General Lee, afterwards Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery Second Corps Army of Northern Virginia. Together with incidents relating to his private life subsequent to the War, collected and edited with the assistance of Marcus J. Wright, formerly Brigadier-General Army of Tennessee, and Agent of the United States for the Collection of Confederate Records. New York, Philadelphia and Washington: J. M. Stoddart & Co. 1886. We never fail to seek and to read with interest any and everything which can shed light on the life and character of General R. E. Lee, and hail with peculiar delight any new contribution to our knowledge of this superb soldier and peerless Christian gentleman. Knowing well the ability of the gallant and accomplished soldier, General A. L. Long,
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ories of the next year. Shortly after the battle of First Manassas, General Long had his first interview with General Lee, and was made Major and Chief of Artillery to the Army of Northwest Virginia. Henceforth Long served to the sad end at Appomattox, under the immediate eye and in the most confidential relations with General Lee, and we have a narrative greatly enhanced in interest and value by this fact. The writer of this review remembers to have heard General Lee, upon more than one ocsburg and The Siege Continued, give accounts of operations during the summer, autumn and winter along the long line which Lee and his mere handful of ragged veterans defended against Grant's overwhelming numbers and resources—From Petersburg to Appomattox, tells the sad story of the breaking of our lines, the retreat, and the surrender—General Lee as a soldier, gives the estimate of an able soldier of his great chief, and concludes General Long's part of the book. The two hundred and seventy
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
t Arlington. The sketch of the career of Captain Lee in the Mexican war, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, besides free quotations from the official reports, which show that even then he was the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the great war between the States—his service as engineer near Baltimore; his three years as Superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point, and his service on the frontier as Lieutenant-Colonel of the famous Second cavalry—is briefly sketched. His views and feelings on the breaking out of the war are presented in interesting letters, which had been before published, but are none the less valuable as showing the real sentiments of this great man. General Long brings out clearly the invaluable service rendered by General Lee as commander-in-chief of
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ar, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, besides free quotations from the official reports, which show that even then he was the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the great war between the States—his service as engineer near Baltimore; his three years as Superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point, and his service on the frontier as Lieutenant-Colonel of the famous Second cavalry—is briefly sketched. His views and feelings on the breaking out of the war are presented in interesting letters, which had been before published, but are none the less valuable as showing the real sentiments of this great man. General Long brings out clearly the invaluable service rendered by General Lee as commander-in-chief of the Virginia forces, and for a time of all of the Confederate forces in V
1 2 3 4 5