hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert E. Lee 523 9 Browse Search
United States (United States) 340 0 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 254 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 216 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 195 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 182 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 170 0 Browse Search
Sedgwick 168 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 160 0 Browse Search
J. A. Early 149 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 141 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
in his possession a number of documents of priceless value, besides all of the material which General Lee himself collected for his proposed history of his campaigns and we record here the earnest hope that the day may not be distant when his book shall be given to the world. 6. We are surprised to see introduced at page 464-465, the famous letter which was published at the North during the war, and purported to be a letter from General Lee at Arlington to his son, G. W. Custis Lee, at West Point, but which General Lee said, at the time, he never wrote, General Custis Lee said he never received, Mrs. Lee pronounced spurious, and we have had occasion several times to prove to be a forgery, from internal evidence as well as from the testimony of the family. 7. We are sorry to see also that, on page 338, the author copies an error, into which Jones, in his Reminiscences of Lee, was led, in attributing the incident of Gordon's men refusing to go forward unless General Lee would go
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of orders on the part of General Longstreet—A Campaign of Strategy, gives the history of the Bristoe campaign, the Mine Run affair, and the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, brings out the marvellous :strategy by which Lee outgeneraled Grant at every point, and the ,heroic fighting by which the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Army of the Potomac wherever they met until after Cold Harbor, having had more men put hors du combat than Lee had, it was compelled to sit down to the siege of Petersburg, a position which it might have taken at first without firing a shot or losing a man— Early's Valley Campaign, gives a brief account of the fo<
Magna (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
anced in interest and value by this fact. The writer of this review remembers to have heard General Lee, upon more than one occasion, speak in high terms of General Long—his ability as a soldier and his character as a man—and the remainder of the memoirs of General Lee's military career are therefore the work of a competent military critic, who speaks of what he saw and learned of General Lee himself, and of which admiring friends may justly say (what our author's own modesty would forbid), Magna pars fuit. We regret that the late date at which we have received the book (only several days before closing this volume), and want of space, must compel us to omit a detailed review of the admirable account given. We can only indicate the headings of the chapters as follows: West Virginia Campaign, where Lee sacrificed his own reputation rather than to sacrifice his men or injure the reputation of others who were striking for the defence of the country as best they could—The South Coas<
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 47
of the early youth and opening manhood of Lee, are very interesting, and contain some new matter in the reminiscences of cotemporaries of the boy, the cadet, the skillful young engineer officer, and the account of his marriage to Mary Custis, and home life at Arlington. The sketch of the career of Captain Lee in the Mexican war, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, besides free quotations from the official reports, which show that even then he was the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the great war between the States—his service as engineer near Baltimore; his three years as Superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point, and his service on the frontier as Lieutenant-Colonel of the famous Second cavalry—is briefly sketched. His views and feelings on the breaking out of the war a
J. M. Stoddart (search for this): chapter 47
ount of Information Hitherto Unpublished. By A. L. Long, formerly Military Secretary to General Lee, afterwards Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery Second Corps Army of Northern Virginia. Together with incidents relating to his private life subsequent to the War, collected and edited with the assistance of Marcus J. Wright, formerly Brigadier-General Army of Tennessee, and Agent of the United States for the Collection of Confederate Records. New York, Philadelphia and Washington: J. M. Stoddart & Co. 1886. We never fail to seek and to read with interest any and everything which can shed light on the life and character of General R. E. Lee, and hail with peculiar delight any new contribution to our knowledge of this superb soldier and peerless Christian gentleman. Knowing well the ability of the gallant and accomplished soldier, General A. L. Long, and his peculiar qualifications for his task, from the fact that he served for a time as military secretary and confidential sta
he full statement of relative numbers and able criticism of military movements of which General Long is so capable. But, then, had he been spared this sore affliction—this thorn in the flesh—in the loss of his vision, he might have been (like Venable, and Marshall, and W. H. Taylor, of Lee's staff, and others of our ablest soldiers) so absorbed in active business that we should have lost these invaluable Recollections of Lee, as a gallant and accomplished soldier saw him. The genealogy ofch Jones, in his Reminiscences of Lee, was led, in attributing the incident of Gordon's men refusing to go forward unless General Lee would go to the rear to the tenth of May, 1864, instead of to the twelfth, the real day, as General Early, Colonel Venable, General Gordon, and others showed, and we have several times published in our papers. But let us say again that despite these blemishes the book is a valuable contribution to our Confederate war literature, and we cordially commend it as
Mary Custis (search for this): chapter 47
and W. H. Taylor, of Lee's staff, and others of our ablest soldiers) so absorbed in active business that we should have lost these invaluable Recollections of Lee, as a gallant and accomplished soldier saw him. The genealogy of the Lee family, and the account of the early youth and opening manhood of Lee, are very interesting, and contain some new matter in the reminiscences of cotemporaries of the boy, the cadet, the skillful young engineer officer, and the account of his marriage to Mary Custis, and home life at Arlington. The sketch of the career of Captain Lee in the Mexican war, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, besides free quotations from the official reports, which show that even then he was the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the great war between the States—his service
William H. Pope (search for this): chapter 47
lly in the heroic defence which afterwards followed—The Peninsula Campaign, which brought McClellan to the gates of Richmond, and by the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines put Lee in command of the Virginia army—The Seven Days Fight, which raised the siege of Richmond, forced McClellan to cower under the protection of his gunboats at Westover, and gave immortal fame to Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia— Pope Outgeneralled, shows how Headquarters in the Saddle were dismounted, and Pope's braggadocio turned into the wail of a disgraceful disaster—Advance into Maryland, sketches that campaign—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of Ge
A. L. Long (search for this): chapter 47
unt of Information Hitherto Unpublished. By A. L. Long, formerly Military Secretary to General Lee,of the gallant and accomplished soldier, General A. L. Long, and his peculiar qualifications for hisoric value. We have not been disappointed. General Long has done his work admirably, and deserves tss and true nobility. The real object of General Long's book is best given in the following extrag the real sentiments of this great man. General Long brings out clearly the invaluable service rShortly after the battle of First Manassas, General Long had his first interview with General Lee, ae than one occasion, speak in high terms of General Long—his ability as a soldier and his character e soldier of his great chief, and concludes General Long's part of the book. The two hundred and was General Lee's military secretary after General Long went to command the artillery of the second in every library. May our gallant friend, General Long, live to write other books, and our good fr[1 more...]
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 47
gn—Fredericksburg, describes that great victory— Chancellorsville, tells the story of that great triumph of military genius and indomitable courage—Gettysburg, is a valuable addition to the great mass of literature on that campaign, and gives cumulative proof of what the publications in our papers had abundantly proven, that the battle of Gettysburg was lost, not by any mistake of General Lee or any failure on the part of his brave boys, but by the disobedience of orders on the part of General Longstreet—A Campaign of Strategy, gives the history of the Bristoe campaign, the Mine Run affair, and the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid—Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, brings out the marvellous :strategy by which Lee outgeneraled Grant at every point, and the ,heroic fighting by which the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Army of the Potomac wherever they met until after Cold Harbor, having had more men put hors du combat than Lee had, it was compelled to sit down to the siege of P
1 2 3 4 5